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  • I'll guess the corners are bent, welded in a straight butt weld. It isn't what I do very often, but I did build a set of 1960 style kitchen chairs. Mine were a copy of an original.

    I built a jig, or more accurately two jigs. Lay it out on a flat surface with stops to support each end you...
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  • WillieB
    replied to I'm a dope.
    I bet I've worn out the equivalent of a grinder forgetting to turn the gas on. I have ongoing birdnest issues, so I turn gas off often, turn on a bit less often.

    I have even been interrupted by the telephone, forgot to turn it off, so I've trained myself to turn off as I answer the phone....
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  • WillieB
    replied to Dynasty 400 purge button
    I wish I had one. Tank, regulator & welder are 8 feet away. I put a copper bar on the foot pedal. It purges & gives me constant flow to adjust CFH. I stick the tail cap in a hole in the table leg to store the torch, The tungsten is then pointed at me. I have to avoid it, or the HF is enough...
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  • WillieB
    replied to Repair of 12.5 Ton Log Splitter
    My 12 ton splitter had, when built, a 3-1/2" cylinder. At 2500 PSIG, that works out to 12 ton thrust. Marketing these days factor the added force of the wedge.

    Nonetheless, mine has about a foot of length in the slide engaging the flat plate on the beam. Yours looks to my eye like...
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  • WillieB
    replied to DC vs AC TIG
    My first MIG experience was a new Miller in 1979. I fell in love with it, but then it was $3500. plus the needed stuff. Many years passed. I tried a number of small cheap MIG machines, none were worth having, none were red or blue. The Millermatic 252 was my first MIG in 2010.

    I believe...
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  • WillieB
    replied to Trying a different size wire
    It used to be .035 hard wire lived in the machine nearly all the time. I don't often weld under 1/16" thick with it, it's when I weld very thin that I have tried .023. I've never been successful with that.
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  • WillieB
    replied to Electrical Question
    I bet you can't get a dual voltage machine rated at 30 amps 240 volts hot powered by 20 amps 120 volts. Only 1/3 the input heat. The breaker's purpose shouldn't be to prevent internal heat in the welder, but it does limit. Other factors apply.
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  • WillieB
    replied to DC vs AC TIG
    Speaking of Ray;

    I one day walked into a maintenance shop at a nearby industrial facility. On the table lay a box. It was a simple box, but a textbook example of the worst welding ever.

    Curiosity was killing me! I had to know the story. Turned out they only had one welding...
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  • WillieB
    replied to DC vs AC TIG
    But someday they might be....
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  • WillieB
    replied to Electrical Question
    Yes, The "melting alloy relays" are not actually relays. They are rotating shaft with a cog wheel. Wrapped around the solder pot is an electric heater. Too much current, heater heats up, melts the solder, allowing a dog under spring pressure to rotate the cog wheel. This is a trigger switch...
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  • WillieB
    replied to Electrical Question
    Industrial motors seldom have internal thermal overload protection. Sometimes it's built into a magnetic motor control. Older motor controls had "melting Alloy Relays. Newer, usually adjustable magnetic sensing relay. They interrupt the electromagnet coil in the controller.

    If you...
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  • WillieB
    replied to Electrical Question
    NEC offers exemptions for fractional horsepower motors. Otherwise, NEC requires thermal overload protection. Many choose the "I don't need to be inspected" loophole.

    If a motor doesn't have internal overload protection, it needs external thermal overload protection.
    ...
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  • WillieB
    replied to Electrical Question
    I'd be surprised if the internal thermostat is disabled, but on a 2400 watt reacting circuit, thermal overload isn't likely going to be reached....
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  • WillieB
    replied to Electrical Question
    Last post wasn't in a language I can understand.

    20 x 120 = 2400. 2400 watts won't generate more BTUs than can be dissipated in a machine calibrated for 240 Volts. Manufacturer doesn't worry about exceeding duty factor supplied at 115 volts. In that case, the circuit will trip before machine...
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  • WillieB
    replied to Electrical Question
    I'd guess the risk of overheat at 120 or 115 volts power is small. I haven't followed much, are we talking about a 20 amp breaker?...
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