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solid wire or flux core

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  • DDA52
    replied
    Originally posted by flukecej View Post
    I recently ran out of 75AR/25CO2 and wire at the same time in my dads MM200. We were running a 220 CF bottle with a 33# spool of Esab Dual Shield 7011 Ultra in 0.035. The Esab wire welded great but had to up the gas flow to about 25 CFH to help cut down splatter. When we went for gas, we swapped out to a 120 CF bottle for a little easier handling and ordered a 25# roll of Lincoln Outersheild 71M. I just used it, the Outershield 71M, for the first time the other day; I had been using some regular Hobart Wire till we got the flux core in. The Lincoln wire runs great in the machine and has almost not splatter at all, except when striking the arc. Gas is running at 20 CFH and this stuff just sizzles while it welds. Great out of position welding, puddles great, penitrates good. This stuff was $105 for the spool from Airgas. The Esab 7100 was priced at $225 from the same place. The guy at Airgas told my dad a lot of welding shops in Lubbock were using the Lincoln wire because it welded good and was cheaper and easier to get than the Esab. Esab just settled a labor strike and prices shot way up and supplies were hard to get while the strike was on.

    .
    FWIW, Lincoln has a flow rate spec of 40-55 cfh on OS 71M.

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  • flukecej
    replied
    I recently ran out of 75AR/25CO2 and wire at the same time in my dads MM200. We were running a 220 CF bottle with a 33# spool of Esab Dual Shield 7011 Ultra in 0.035. The Esab wire welded great but had to up the gas flow to about 25 CFH to help cut down splatter. When we went for gas, we swapped out to a 120 CF bottle for a little easier handling and ordered a 25# roll of Lincoln Outersheild 71M. I just used it, the Outershield 71M, for the first time the other day; I had been using some regular Hobart Wire till we got the flux core in. The Lincoln wire runs great in the machine and has almost not splatter at all, except when striking the arc. Gas is running at 20 CFH and this stuff just sizzles while it welds. Great out of position welding, puddles great, penitrates good. This stuff was $105 for the spool from Airgas. The Esab 7100 was priced at $225 from the same place. The guy at Airgas told my dad a lot of welding shops in Lubbock were using the Lincoln wire because it welded good and was cheaper and easier to get than the Esab. Esab just settled a labor strike and prices shot way up and supplies were hard to get while the strike was on.

    About welding in windy conditions. Use stick if you are outside, unless you have a way to put up a truely reliable wind break. It is possible for you to blow the gas away from your mig when welding by simply breathing to hard under the hood. Any breaze at all can blow the shield gas away. If it is windy out side, especially with a SE, Southerly, or SW wind around my area, I have to shut the shop door down to block the wind. I don't shut it all the way, but enough to block the wind to not interfere while welding. Running stick out side on a windy day, 35MPH+, can mess you up as well.

    About voltage. 110/115/120 is how voltage is commonly referred to. Depending on the time of day and the load usage at your place, the voltage in your wall plug can be anywhere from 110 to 120V. My wall sockets generally show around 118 to 120V. But around 5:00pm, when people in the neighborhood start coming home and switching things on in the house, I have seen it drop to 110 to 113 until the line surge levels out and things settle down around 115 to 117. When the demand drops, the voltage goes back to 118 to 120. 220/230/240 V is just the combining of the two 110/115/120 V Single Phase legs to get the higher voltage. People tend to call 110/220V, 115/230V, and 120/240V by what is the most common reading in their area.

    The most common 3 Phase in my area is 4-Wire 230V 3 Phase and 480V 3-Wire (Delta) and 4-Wire (Grounded Delta) 3 Phase. The 4-Wire 230V 3 Phase generally has two low legs, 110 to 120V per leg, and is capable of providing 115V and 230V 1 Phase from those to legs, back to ground and/or neutral, if available. The high leg is generally 208V. But when you check from either of the low legs to the high leg, you get 220V to 240V, thus 230V 3 Phase. The 480V 3 Phase tends to check out around 487V to 497V in my area, with no load. Start the pump and check the voltage under load, viola, 480V. Don't have many Wye connections around these parts, not on the farms anyway. I have seen allot of the 277/480V 3 phase in industrial setting, in town, not out in the country, not around here anyway.

    Franklin Electric Submersible Motors show a NAMEPLATE VOLTAGE on all of their products. Single Phase Motors tend to be listed as 110 or 220V. Three Phase motors are listed 220 and 460V. The key to them, when the motor is running under a load, is the voltage within 10% of name plate value. My example of the 480V 3 phase checking 497V with no load and checking 480V under a load is within the 10% of name plate. If the NO LOAD was checking 500V or higher, the motor running under a load would be well over 480; have seen a motor running 498V load and 516V no load. That is time to call the power company and have the lineman adjust the buck/boost transformer a bit.

    I hope that this dialouge was informative and educational for all.

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  • Darmik
    replied
    to buy or not to buy

    i'm that little voice in your head Matic 251 or you'll be sorrrrrry
    Flux core I think there is only 2 types *Fabco Hobart XL-71 .045
    ESAB 7100 ultra dual sheild .045
    Solid wire pretty much any .045 or.035 will do

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  • fyoung
    replied
    That's right

    Originally posted by MAC702
    I founded the school of "You Can't Have Too Many Feeders." We are loosely affiliated with the well-known shooting college of "The Fastest Reload Is a Second Gun."
    I guess that's right!
    Farris

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  • MAC702
    replied
    Originally posted by fyoung
    I've got a friend that keeps flux on one of his welders just for outside work..i guess if you can afford it that would be the way to go.
    Farris
    I founded the school of "You Can't Have Too Many Feeders." We are loosely affiliated with the well-known shooting college of "The Fastest Reload Is a Second Gun."

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  • fyoung
    replied
    flux-solid

    I've got a friend that keeps flux on one of his welders just for outside work..i guess if you can afford it that would be the way to go.
    Farris

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  • aametalmaster
    replied
    Normally i use 100% .030 solid in my shop. Today i was welding outside on my neighbors truck, flux core would have been nice...Bob

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  • gdad
    replied
    When you are talking about cored wire, I assume you are referring to self shielded or "Innershield" wire because your 210 won't have near enough output to run dual shield effectively. My advise would be to stay inside and use solid wire whenever possible around the farm. When you have to be outside, here are some things to consider: research what type of cored wire you are using carefully and taylor it to your needs; many of your more common innershield wires are NOT designed for multi-pass applications and result in a brittle weld if used for such. I would reserve the cored wire for lighter work unless you make sure to get the right stuff. Also, a little more skill is needed with cored wire when welding out of position. MOST (not all) cored wires need to be run uphill to produce a good quality weld. My personal opinion is that a good engine driven stick welder is more versatile for farm use unless you have a nice shop to work in.

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  • Klugger7214
    replied
    Alright thanks, that clears thing up quite a bit. My relatives are were trying to tel me it was 220. And now i can prove them wrong.

    Thanks again,
    Klug

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  • MAC702
    replied
    All the service I see in this part of the country or on gensets I've seen/used is 240V. (And the common wall outlet is 120V.)

    If a device is listed for 220, 230, 240, or 250, it will work just fine, though, in all cases of which I am aware. Usually, your receptacles and cord caps will say 250V, to show that they are designed for AT LEAST that amount of voltage.

    I think 220V is a left-over from when it WAS the voltage. Maybe one of the old guys on the East Coast knows more about that, though.

    Now, 208V and 277V are another story. Those are typically legs of 3-phase systems and you will need to make sure those are properly matched because they are too far away from 240V to be used by most equipment marked 220 - 240 Volts.

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  • Klugger7214
    replied
    Yep, I actually still have 110 with all my outlets and just put a new box in with new 220 outlets. Speaking of which I here all different types of voltage numbers 220, 230 and 240 which really is it?

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  • MAC702
    replied
    I've welded outdoors with solid wire and gas, but it's a pain. We have a lot of days with no wind here, but it's amazing how often some little tiny gust will blow your gas away just enough to throw some porosity into your weld. I keep flux-cored wire in my two field feeders, and solid wire in the shop feeder.

    Overall, solid wire and gas is cheaper and much faster in terms of clean-up, but requires significantly cleaner metal for good results.

    So they both definitely have a place in my arsenal.

    I saw your other thread which mentions no longer needing the DVI, so we'll leave that alone. You will never regret having 240V available in a shop. I hope you ran it big enough for future upgrades. Did you put in a full subpanel while you were at it?

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  • Klugger7214
    replied
    What about penetration? Would your average stick welder penetrate farther than say a DVI on flux core? (Waiting for my DVI too getting one this summer )

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  • Jet A-1
    replied
    With no wind, sure solid is okay outside, you may have to flow some more gas though. Flux core tends to burn hotter so it tends to warp lighter sheet metal. It's just the thing for welding heavier guage stuff and cold rolled, in my case up to 3/16 (Cricket XL!, ohhh, if only Santa would bring me a DVI!). Don't let the solid wire get damp though. It'll rust and cause nothing but grief, it took me some time and a few spoiled rolls to figure this out...duhhhh. Just take the roll out and keep it wrapped up in the dry when not in use. The flux core doesn't seem to mind the damp though.

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  • Klugger7214
    replied
    Would it be bad to weld with solid wire outside if the wind isn't too bad or is that a no-no all around?

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