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  • Wworks
    started a topic i need some hel plz

    i need some hel plz

    hey im new to metalworking and do not yet have a welder. i want to buy a mig welder and i need one that is reliable yet cheap, and preferably new or rarely used. i was looking at the websites and was thinking the HOBART handler 140, the MILLER millermatic 135, or the LINCOLN SP-135t. Also, i need a tubing bender that is cheap and was wondering how the sheiding gas worked and what i needed to weld steel and aluminum.

  • mccutter
    replied
    Your first welder...

    If you can afford it, and have access to 220V, get a higher amp machine vs a 110V model. I had a Century 110V machine and found it only worked at the very highest settings. But then again, that Century was a P.O.S.! If you go with a Miller 110V, it is not really as simple as just using a 20Amp breaker--You will need to make sure the wiring from the breaker to the outlet is at least 12 guage and preferably 10ga. And as close to the electrical service as possible. Any welder requires a clean, unrestricted source of electricity that meets its amperage requirements. It is not quite as simple as just replacing a breaker or outlet. Inadequate wiring will burn down the house or garage!

    A 220V machine will have more power (and amps) available and may be simpler to wire but may not be as portable. If convenient, you could always plug into your electric range outlet, but that gets old, especially for the wife!

    If you plan on welding aluminum, you'll need a spoolgun, period. Other methods such as push-pull and special liners in the MIG gun are more specialized and not cost-effective for the "ordinary" welder. Once upon a time, I lost a lucrative yacht refurb/welding job because I didn't want to "invest" in a more powerful welder and spoolgun. Back then, the welder was a Millermatic185 with Spoolmate185 and the cost was around $1500 for the package. Now that setup is known as the Millermatic 210 and Spoolmate 3035, which I now own and heartily recommend if you can afford or finance it. Going rate is around $1900 including shipping. If I had bought the welder back then, it would have paid for itself two-fold by the time I was done with the job. One problem was that the yacht owner didn't want to advance me the money for the job (at least a third is customary). Sometimes the richest people can take the longest time to pay--but I digress!

    Keep in mind that you'll also need at least one bottle of Argon/CO2 to start welding steel and another of straight Argon if you want to weld aluminum. I own my own tanks and a smaller size from your local supply house will run you around $125 each. Avoid buying "used" tanks unless the seller can produce a receipt. Older, anonymous tanks may not or will not be able to be filled by your local welding supply company.

    Good luck and don't forget to get a good fire extinguisher, wear the proper safety gear and to be aware of fire dangers!

    Leave a comment:


  • sjmiller
    replied
    Welder selection

    I spent months lurking here and in other welding FAQ's/Blogs before buying my first welder. My decision point boiled down to what was the thickness of the metal I was most likely going to weld - not the maximum I would encounter. As a hobbyist does it matter if I can weld 1" plate in a single pass, or if it takes multiple passes - no it doesn't. Should I buy a welder that makes me hire an electrician to add capacity to my hose wiring?

    As a hobbyist - most of my welding has been on 22 and 26 gage sheet, and 1/8th in steel. The bigger is better argument works when you are a business saving dollars on per mimute welding costs. I run a MM135 and a Dynasty 200DX - usually at the low end of capacity.

    Steve

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  • docweld
    replied
    I would recomend the MM 135. I had and older one and now I have the new one and they both work fantastic. I never abusted them or any of my equipment But I us them hard. The little migs worked wonderful.
    You need to look at the internal componits of any peice of equipment before you buy it. You get what you pay for. Are the rollers made for plastic or metal? How long will it last? Anything you buy should work out of the box, but in 1-10 years will it still work? Some times saving a couple $ now will cost you more in the long run.

    Good luck
    Doc

    Leave a comment:


  • garth
    replied
    tubing bender

    hi take a look at this web site they have free plans for a lot of stuff and a tube bender good luck
    Last edited by envano; 03-27-2006, 01:39 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Manny
    replied
    FYI,
    There is a Hobart 135 for sale on the Hobart site now for $325.00 that is described as like new.
    Manny

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  • Firey
    replied
    There is a wide range of tigs that do ac/dc welding so it depends
    on What thickness your welding I also would go for the thickest you would be
    welding perhaps the Dynasty 300 series.Great machine.(Just an idia).as far as the bender hobart is a great place to start.I got mine for $79 and change on sale it can do flat,squire,or round.Good hunting.

    Leave a comment:


  • Manny
    replied
    If doing aluminum is a must than don't bother with any of those machines, save up and get a bigger mig that can run a spoolgun or learn to gas weld it. If you want to do steel than any of the big three, Hobart, Lincoln & Miller will be good. Best bang for the buck seems to be Hobart, and if you don't need to use gas the new Hobart 125 EZ looks like one of the handiest welders around, and was on sale @ Northern Tool for $352. It won't allow you to upgrade to gas however.
    Manny

    Leave a comment:


  • silverbackman
    replied
    Tubing bender

    I forgot to mention that I saw a set of plans on ebay for around $10 to build your own bender. I don't know how good it was (I wasn't actually looking for plans for one, so I didn't spend the time to find out) but from the pictures it looked OK. For $10, you really can go wrong. If there crappy, sell them to that neighbor that you don't like for $15 (LOL).
    Jeff.

    Leave a comment:


  • silverbackman
    replied
    I use my mm135 for most of my welding. It's a great welder, but it does draw a lot of amps. Long runs of extension cord are not good. I run it with flux core when I'm away from the shop so that I'm not having to haul tanks and gauges.
    I'll try to explain this next part as simple as I can. Sheilding gas is used to keep impurities in the air out of the weld puddle. Without it, your welds will be garbage. Fluxcore is like stick welding in which it has a flux that sheilds the weld puddle, instead of using a gas. Once the weld cools, it forms a slag which is chipped off the weld with a hammer and/or wire brush. Fluxcore is a 'hotter' weld than with gas, so it tends to distort thin metal more. You also get more spatter (little round balls of metal) around the weld, and in my opinion (I'm not sure if this is true or not) but I think there's a lot more smoke.
    For the most part, any of the mig welders you mentions will weld steel with either gas or flux. Aluminum requires you to a buy spool gun. Aluminum is too soft to try and push it all the way from the machine to the end of you gun. What a spool gun does it put a small spool of aluminum wire right at the handle of the gun.
    Now don't take this as a slight, but just from the questions you asked it appears that you have little or no knowledge of welding. I am, however, impressed that you want to learn something new, and in my opinion, nothing is better than learning how to weld, because welders are the coolest people around! I would suggest that you look into taking a introductory coarse at you local college. Most have weekend or evening coarses that will give you a grasp of the basics. There's a reason welders charge what they do, because it's not something that you can just do, it's a skilled trade. Welding, as with most things in life, comes with practice, so don't get discouraged when you ruin a few projects. You'll learn more from your mistakes than you ever will from finally getting it right. And remember that there are a lot of people right here in this forum that can answer just about any question that you have.
    Good luck, have fun and welcome to the wonderful world of welding (that sounded like something you'd here at the end of those films in high school shop class!).
    Jeff.

    Leave a comment:


  • burninbriar
    replied
    Originally posted by Wworks
    hey im new to metalworking and do not yet have a welder. i want to buy a mig welder and i need one that is reliable yet cheap, and preferably new or rarely used. i was looking at the websites and was thinking the HOBART handler 140, the MILLER millermatic 135, or the LINCOLN SP-135t. Also, i need a tubing bender that is cheap and was wondering how the sheiding gas worked and what i needed to weld steel and aluminum.
    What thickness of steel and aluminum do you expect to work with ? I would take the heavyest material I would be welding and get a machine big enough to weld a little heavier. you dont want to be running a machine at its maximum capacity all the time.

    Leave a comment:


  • FABRAT
    replied
    Originally posted by t0rchwelder
    I've done up to 1/2'' mild steel with the mm 135 with multipass. jus make shure u have a 20 amp breaker.
    Yes make sure you have a 20 amp breaker.. i have a hobart 140 and had some trouble poping breakers for a while...also i believe they have fixed the problem but on my model role of wire was held on the spindle with a wing nut...this would back off and the wire would then spool off and make a big mess . i corrected the problem by putting a nylock nut on the spindle.
    best of luck, Nick

    Leave a comment:


  • t0rchwelder
    replied
    I've done up to 1/2'' mild steel with the mm 135 with multipass. jus make shure u have a 20 amp breaker.

    Leave a comment:


  • link523
    replied
    i dont know what kind of tube your bending but you can get a pipe bender from harbor frieght for less than $100 but its for black pipe tube bends for small tubes try woodward fab , large tubes www.pro-tools.com harbor frieght has a good notcher uses hole saws just get a good bi-metal hole saw

    Leave a comment:


  • Chuck U&R
    replied
    Mig Welder

    I have a NIB LincolnPro-Mig 135 for sale - same as the SP-135.
    http://www.mylincolnelectric.com/Ca...heet.asp?p=2515
    I'd like to get $400. + shipping.

    Leave a comment:

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