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Building a Tig Cooler

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  • acourtjester
    replied
    Tig Cooler

    Here is a cooler I built using a carbonizer.
    I keep the SS tank and added a fan to the motor shaft for cooling.
    I used quick disconnect fittings so I can disconnect the torch for storage of both.
    The radiator is from an auto AC unit with a shroud to aid cooling.
    Attached Files

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  • Drf255
    replied
    Has anyone used a counterflow plate heat exchanger and running hose water to cool the coolant? I brew beers and believe a small one could be had for around 75$. Then I would just need a motorized pump. The only downside would be wasted ground water unless a second pump was used.

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  • Slash
    replied
    Originally posted by CharleyL View Post
    That's a bit expensive for a DIY cooler. My cooler only cost me about $200 out of
    pocket. Of course, I don't have flow indicators, but I can watch the flow through the clear tubing.
    My plans called for the pump to be activated only when the pedal is depressed, and I have an adjustable time delay relay that would keep the pump running for a minute or so after the pedal is released.

    I have a temperature switch to control the fan, so it only comes on when the coolant starts to get hot. Also controlled by a time delay relay.

    A beeper alarm was going to be wired into the pressure and flow switch, to alert me in case there was a blockage or some issue with the pump.

    I have lighted gauges for the front panel to indicate coolant temperature and pressure, in addition to the flow meter.

    And the list goes on... This was NOT going to be your typical home-built cooler with a Tupperware tank and short sections of garden hose connecting everything.

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  • CharleyL
    replied
    That's a bit expensive for a DIY cooler. My cooler only cost me about $200 out of
    pocket. Of course, I don't have flow indicators, but I can watch the flow through the clear tubing.

    The Carbonator was $100 and I used the 2 gal stainless tank as well as the motor
    and pump. The oil cooler coil was about $40 from Advance Auto. The galv sheet
    metal, hose, and the pipe fittings from Lowes amounted to about $50. I already had
    the muffin fans. A gallon of RV antifreeze and a gallon of distilled water completed
    the purchases.

    Charley

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  • Slash
    replied
    I have tons of components to build a nice TIG cooler - Procon pump w/motor, heat exchanger, 8" muffin fan, S/S Reservoir, nice flow gauge, flow switch, temperature and pressure gauges, fittings, LOTS of relays, timers and electrical supplies.

    The original plan was to build a cooler for my Dynasty 200. I ended up buying a new Dynasty 350 with the cart and CoolMate unit. My cooler would have been better, but Miller's works fine.

    Anyway, if anyone is interested in the stuff let me know. I probably have $600-800 of cooler components sitting in the corner of the shop.

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  • CharleyL
    replied
    I used a new transmission oil cooler purchased from Advance Auto Parts and 2
    muffin fans, with a Procon pump and a 2 gallon stainless reservoir from a
    carbonator. I run a 50/50 distilled water and RV antifreeze mix in it and it's going on 2 years now, with no problems so far. My welder is a white face DialArc HF and I do a lot of aluminum with it, so I tend to run it at the higher currents a lot.

    You should not run higher than about 60 psi or you will have line rupture
    problems. Mine is set for 50 psi.

    Here is the link (with pictures)

    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...p/t-18880.html.



    Charley

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  • Tim B
    replied
    would the cooling coil out of an air conditioner work too?

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  • H80N
    replied
    bump.....

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  • Anti-GMAW
    replied
    Those dialarc HF 250's are nice machines. I havent ran TIG on them yet but I have a **** of a lot of time on them with stick. They definitly take a beating thats for sure. Has the contactor on it had any problems though? I had problems on the two that I ran, one contactor had to be replaced and the other was prety iffy. Other than that they were exelent machines

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  • Ed ke6bnl
    replied
    Originally posted by MNellis View Post
    The welder is a Dialarc 250 HF but I haven't run it real hard at this poin. I tried my first shot at AL this evening and made a real mess of some scrap but at least the cooler worked well. I have to weld an aluminum bracket but there is no way I can actually produce something acceptable at this point.
    thats the same tig I have and instead of a coil mine goes into a 5-10 gallon fluid holding tank that cools the fluid down has been working great for some 15year on my used machine. Ed ke6bnl

    Leave a comment:


  • Tex
    replied
    Aluminum TIG

    If you're ever in the Killeen area stop by the Central Texas College hangars at Skylark airport. We have the same Dialarc 250HF with a cooler and I've got some scrap aluminum. We'll weld a couple beads!

    Leave a comment:


  • fun4now
    replied
    aluminum can be a pain thats no dought, its almost like the 2 pices are opiset magnets. as it heats up to puddle they repell each other rather than runnig togather like steel dose.
    dont know if it will help but i found that just as it reaches the melt point and starts to repell hit it with some filler and it will join, dont try to wait it out for them to join into one puddle all by them selves, its just not going to happen also a fresh hit with the SS wire brush just befor you start goes a long way to a good start. lots of waisted scraps ahead for ya but hang in ther you will get it in time.

    Leave a comment:


  • MNellis
    replied
    Originally posted by fun4now View Post
    i was just wondering as it looked like you might be hooked up to a larg welder with high amps output, mine only has 185 to ofer so its not as big a deal.
    also many use anty freeze in there coolers no problems, i supose it would keep the rust under controle but it would not hurt to incorperate some form of filtration just to be on the safe side.
    The welder is a Dialarc 250 HF but I haven't run it real hard at this poin. I tried my first shot at AL this evening and made a real mess of some scrap but at least the cooler worked well. I have to weld an aluminum bracket but there is no way I can actually produce something acceptable at this point.
    Last edited by MNellis; 01-21-2007, 08:45 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • fun4now
    replied
    i was just wondering as it looked like you might be hooked up to a larg welder with high amps output, mine only has 185 to ofer so its not as big a deal.
    also many use anty freeze in there coolers no problems, i supose it would keep the rust under controle but it would not hurt to incorperate some form of filtration just to be on the safe side.

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    stainless would be a better option...too many diferent metals= strange problems later. I have a homemade one with it's own weird set of problems one being aluminum and copper and brass and hi-freek all together.
    I hope this unit serves you well. As long as you are not in the biz of mfging these for folks I'd say you'll be fine anyhow...mines been working prolly 20 yrs or better now and I use car antifreeze also. Been waiting a LLOOOONNNNGGGG time for that torch to plug up so I can buy a new flexhead.

    Leave a comment:

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