Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Air ????

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • fun4now
    replied
    if its at all possible i would try to go up to some thing like the home depot's husky 60 gal tank version. its 2X the $ but 5X's the compresor and should cover about any air tools you want to use. i got one 3 years ago for $400 ish and the cambe hose version is about the same threw TSC. its a good home shop option if you dont have a lot of $ to put into one. it will give you 10.4 at 90 psi witch is plenty for most tools and the ones that need more the 60 gal compasity will help out on them.
    a 2 stage would be better but probly over kill for the home hobby shop. i intend to add a small sand blast cabinet to my shop some time this summer and having the air to run it already will keep the caust of getting one down. the lil compressor you are looking at would have no hope of trying to sand blat and will likely fall verry short on most tools.
    most of the tanks are now labled by what tools they will run, keep in mind they might be streching it a bit on the lable.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • harcosparky
    replied
    Originally posted by leeschaumberg View Post
    Tank size and scfh make a big differance! You can plumb in more tanks to any compresser as you need. This way you don't need a monster to drag around. Buy a 5 hp two stage (max psi) with a small tank. I even got a tank that had (2) 7.5 hp two stage compressers monted on a 200 gallon tank!
    This is what I did. Started out with a 60 gallon, 2 stage Camplell Hausfeld compressor. It alone powered all but the most agressive of sanders I used without running too much. I saw an ad on Craigs List for a " blown up 60 gallon compressor " .. $50 ... the only thing salvageable was the tank, we plumbed it into the other compressor and WOW ... all that air. We also have a smaller 20 gallon horizontal tank that we use inline with the tool just for a little extra capacity closer to the tool.

    Even my plasma cutter likes all the air it can get.

    Leave a comment:


  • leeschaumberg
    replied
    Air compressor capacity

    Tank size and scfh make a big differance! You can plumb in more tanks to any compresser as you need. This way you don't need a monster to drag around. Buy a 5 hp two stage (max psi) with a small tank. I even got a tank that had (2) 7.5 hp two stage compressers monted on a 200 gallon tank!

    Leave a comment:


  • wireburner
    replied
    if I get 1 I will use it for cleaning up shop and cut off wheelo very little

    Leave a comment:


  • tsalagi
    replied
    if i was you, i would stay away from air grinders. when back gouging they bog down more than electric. not to mention alot more maintenance.

    i only use air for plasma cutter, carbon arc, and cleaning shop.

    Leave a comment:


  • SkidSteerSteve
    replied
    duty cycle

    I just scanned through the thread so somebody might have already mentioned this, but I think it's worth repeating. Not only is Volume @ Pressure a necessity for tools, but make sure you have a good oil-bath unit and not an oil less one. It is tempting to cheap out on a low duty cycle machine that may or may not be used a lot, especially for a home shop. I've seen compressors that at first appeared to be a pretty good machine until you read the fine print. You only have to over heat a compressor one time to completely fry it, and then you get to see what reed valves look like when they crystallize If you do pick up an oil less, make sure and give it plenty of rest time between demands until you get a feel for what it will reliably do for you. Oh, and another topic for air systems.... CLEAN AND DRY!!! Those two words can not be over emphasized (in my opinion, anyway). It is a good habit to drain your tank every time you use it. I think that is the single best maintenance that can, but usually isn't, done for a compressor. SSS
    Last edited by SkidSteerSteve; 01-02-2007, 10:05 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • TomVeatch
    replied
    Originally posted by wireburner View Post
    will a 17 or 15 gallon air composer do the job 4 a rookie and some good tools if so I buy one at Lowe`s or Home depot about $200
    It all comes down to the air requirements of the tool. Check the pressure and CFM (cubic feet/minute) requirement of the most demanding tool you will be using. Then see what CFM the compressor will provide at that pressure. If the compressor will output that much volume at that pressure, then you are in.

    If the compressor is too small, you may still be ok if the air storage tank is large enough and/or the usage cycle on the tool is short enough. Otherwise, with a small compressor, small storage tank, and large demand tool, you'll be in a mode of working for a short time then waiting a long time while the compressor catches up and refills the tank.

    And, of course all the standard advice holds, i.e., use as large a diameter and as short a length air hose as you can get away with, etc.

    I have a small compressor about that size that I've used for paint sprayers and nail guns without any problems. But, I doubt it would work for more than a few minutes at a time with tools needing much more air than those.

    Leave a comment:


  • jfsmith
    replied
    I have two compressor, one in the machine shop and one in the hand work shop. The main shop is a really nice one, with an aux 100 gallon bottle to keep the volume up. The other one is one that you maybe interested in.

    It's HF, that goes on sale regularly for between $150 and $170 dollars.

    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=94667

    I have seen this same compressor under different store brands for more money.

    Mine works well, I use it for the air source for my Plasma Cutter, for my air brushes and some of my air grinders.

    Jerry
    Last edited by jfsmith; 01-02-2007, 05:02 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • JHCHOPPERS
    replied
    Its about CFM, not the tank size or even the horse power of the motor. If you want to run tools, you need about 9 - 10 CFM at 90 PSI

    CFM is similar to Current as PSI is to Voltage. (You can not start you car with a 12Volt lantern battery...not enough current)

    Leave a comment:


  • wireburner
    started a topic Air ????

    Air ????

    will a 17 or 15 gallon air composer do the job 4 a rookie and some good tools if so I buy one at Lowe`s or Home depot about $200
Working...
X