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  • Gas Tank Repair

    The tank is from a 60's era Chrysler. Didn't think to take a picture with that wonderful, weld friendly (NOT), JB Weld repair that the guy did to get a few more miles of driving before pulling the tank. This is about my 15th gas tank repair
    .
    Step One: PURGE the tank. I use Nitrogen for my purge gas, much cheaper than Argon. You can see the small hole in the vent tube. That's to let the atmosphere out while the nitrogen takes its place. Nitrogen is lighter than air so the vent hole needs to be on the bottom. Side note Argon is heavier so vent hole goes on top.

    Step Two: Clean the weld area. I used a wire brush on a 90 deg. air grinder and a tungsten as a pick to get the little pieces of JB weld out of the little nooks and crannies.

    Step Three: Weld it up. Watching for any cracks leading away as I weld. Had one run up the right side just a bit.

    I purged the tank for about 1/2 hour at 10 cfh, absolutely longer than needed. I have plenty of gas and didn't want to bother with the math. Turned the flow done to 5 while welding.



  • #2
    Looks like a reasonable fix. Do you wash the tank out or just let it evaporate dry?
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    • #3
      I hate JB Weld....wait, no, I love JB Weld, but I hate it on something I have to weld, especially if that something is aluminum.

      I’ve welded on diesel tanks, never on a gas tank. I think it makes me nervous, but you sir, clearly have it under control.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
        I hate JB Weld....wait, no, I love JB Weld, but I hate it on something I have to weld, especially if that something is aluminum.

        I’ve welded on diesel tanks, never on a gas tank. I think it makes me nervous, but you sir, clearly have it under control.
        Gas tanks for sure , should make everyone nervous when welding especially on aluminum and I use everything known to flush and let them air out for days............Diesel tanks in certain environments using certain welding methods can also be equally quite explosive.........if proper protocols are not followed.

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        • #5
          PROPER PROTOCALS, can't say it enough. Tank was bone dry when I got it. I did not rinse or anything. Bone dry does not mean no boom. Gas gets into the pores of the metal and just won't go away. With a proper purge you can have liquid fuel in the tank and it won't explode (DON"T TRY IT) no O2 no ignition, always drain as best you can. The first fuel tank I did was out of an airplane. Good size aluminum tank with a split seam, about 7" or 8" long. I did the math then purged it twice the time calculated. Got it ready to weld, sat down put my foot on the pedal and broke out in a cold sweat. Thought hey they said this was the right way to do it so stepped on the pedal and struck an arc, no boom. Started to breath again. It still gives me pause every time I weld on fuel tanks but do a good purge and your good to go. Side note the last 5 tanks I've welded on all came from my sons fab shop. He tells me Dad your set up for purging I'm not, so why don't you just do it for me.

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          • #6
            I felt like this everyday in the refinery. Don’t skip steps and purge everything
            Bob Wright

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