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  • Sump Pump Pipe Auger

    My sump pump drains into a grey 4” PVC pipe that connects to a 12” PVC pipe that runs along the side of my street about 7’ below the ground. I believe that the grey pipe was originally installed in the 70’s, so it is about 50 years old. Over the years the pipe has become very brittle. 13 years ago, I replaced 12 feet of the old pipe near the street and 8 years ago I replaced about 25 feet on the other end where the sump pump drains into it. This left 30 feet of the grey brittle pipe in the middle. Last fall the pipe wouldn’t accept the water from the sump pump. From my past experience I have found that the roots find their way through small holes and cracks in the pipe and entirely fill the pipe with hair like filaments. I snaked it out and had to pound the snake through roots in three different places. Fortunately, this temporary fix lasted all the way until this summer, when I could dig up the old pipe and replace it. Digging the trench was painful because the trench passes by a huge maple tree with tons of surface roots, which had to be cut with an axe. The first step was to set up a bypass pipe to divert the sump pump water, while I was digging up the old pipe.

    1. Sump pump bypass pipe
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    The complication was removing the old grey 4” pipe that was under the sidewalk, so that I could replace it with a new 4” pipe.

    2. Broken pipe near sidewalk
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    I decided to use an auger to tear out the old pipe and pull it out of the hole. I started with a store-bought auger that is used to plant flowers and the like.

    3. Auger
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    I used my trusty Fireball magnets to hold the auger in place, so that I could weld radial teeth on the OD of the screw of the auger.

    4. Fixture for welding radial teeth
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    5. Radial tooth welded
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    Miller Thunderbolt
    Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
    Miller Dynasty 200DX
    Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
    Lincoln LE 31 MP
    Lincoln 210 MP
    Clausing/Colchester 15" Lathe
    16" DuAll Saw
    15" Drill Press
    7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
    20 Ton Arbor Press
    Bridgeport

  • #2
    I used an angle iron, supported by radiator clamps, to line up the shaft to the auger. The auger shaft was 1/16” smaller than the ¾” pipe, so I used two 1/32” shims on each side where the shaft of the auger contacted the angle iron.

    6. Fixture for welding shaft
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    7. Shaft welded
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    I welded a plug to the end of the shaft and then welded a hex shaft to the plug so that I could spin the auger with my electric drill.

    8. Hex key welded
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    I welded some teeth to the front of the auger to cut through the hair like roots that filled up the pipe in several locations. I added the disk to pilot the auger on the old pipe. I didn’t put radial teeth on the first pitch of the screw of the auger to assist in piloting the auger.

    9. Auger done 1
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    10. Auger done 2
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    Miller Thunderbolt
    Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
    Miller Dynasty 200DX
    Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
    Lincoln LE 31 MP
    Lincoln 210 MP
    Clausing/Colchester 15" Lathe
    16" DuAll Saw
    15" Drill Press
    7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
    20 Ton Arbor Press
    Bridgeport

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    • #3
      I have a huge stud drill, but I decided to use a low speed ½” industrial drill to power the auger. It turns out that very little torque is required to break up the old pipe and pull the pipe shards and a little dirt from the hole. The auger acts more like a reamer as opposed to a drill bit.

      11. Pulling broken shards from hole
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      12. Drilling (reaming) setup
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      13. New pipe installed 1
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      14. New pipe installed 2
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      15. Trench covered
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      -Don
      Miller Thunderbolt
      Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
      Miller Dynasty 200DX
      Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
      Lincoln LE 31 MP
      Lincoln 210 MP
      Clausing/Colchester 15" Lathe
      16" DuAll Saw
      15" Drill Press
      7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
      20 Ton Arbor Press
      Bridgeport

      Comment


      • #4
        Good Job.....and ya know there is some root killer liquid additive that the septic tank folks sell for drain lines between the house and tank that seems to work pretty well ( flush it down the line) if ya think those nasty roots will continue to try and find there way into other joints...

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        • #5
          Good job, Don.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by tarry99 View Post
            Good Job.....and ya know there is some root killer liquid additive that the septic tank folks sell for drain lines between the house and tank that seems to work pretty well ( flush it down the line) if ya think those nasty roots will continue to try and find there way into other joints...
            I will keep that in mind.

            Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
            Good job, Don.
            Thanks.
            Miller Thunderbolt
            Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
            Miller Dynasty 200DX
            Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
            Lincoln LE 31 MP
            Lincoln 210 MP
            Clausing/Colchester 15" Lathe
            16" DuAll Saw
            15" Drill Press
            7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
            20 Ton Arbor Press
            Bridgeport

            Comment


            • #7
              This fix should last a good long time but your trees hate you,,, ha
              Where they clog os whete the pope had been dsmaged by the cable guy or old ceramic or non glued joints.
              Last edited by Sberry; 08-19-2021, 07:59 PM.

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