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Brown-Lipe 55315531-A Shift Rod Repair

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  • Brown-Lipe 55315531-A Shift Rod Repair




    Couldn't edit title!!! It is a Brown-Lipe 5531-A

    Hello,
    Personal project. Tear down and refresh of an old auxiliary transmission for my daily driver. Some of you might be familiar with these units. The packing appears to be leather. With a standard caliper I measured the deepest pit at .0150", probably closer to .0250". This is something I would take to a machine shop. Seems this group is well versed in this kind of fix. If any of you are in the vicinity of Roswell, New Mexico I could drive over and drop it off. How would you recomend I have this repaired?
    Thank's, Chris
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    Last edited by Chris401; 12-20-2020, 09:24 PM.

  • #2
    Couple more photos.
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    • #3
      First I would look into "speedi-sleeve". I think that is how it is spelled? Company makes very thin sleeves that slide over the old to give a new surface for seals to ride on. Whether they have an appropiate size, I do not know. 2)Have it welded up and then remachined. I would use tig on something like this. 3) You could also try cleaning it really good, roughing it up and using epoxy. Then carefully file/sand it smooth.

      Not sure if this is just the seal area or it rides in the bushing also? If in the bushing then welding/machinining is the way to go.
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      • #4
        I didn't think of sleeving it. The pits were caused by the dry packing. It look's like it was left in overdrive for a few decades, without shifting it doesn't get fresh oil on it. I was thinking about making a different seal and housing.

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        • #5
          I sleeved a transmission main shaft a week or so ago. I almost never take pictures, same for this case. Anyway, the shaft went to some obscure ford transmission that was made in Mexico and the speed shop couldn’t find one anywhere. So I had what was for all intents and purposes a one of a kind. All I did was turn the shaft down on the lathe, made a sleeve a couple thou under size, heated it with a torch and slammer her on there quick. The first time I wasn’t quick enough and got half way down before she froze on there. If you’ve ever done a shrink fit, there was no chance of pressing it off. Has to turn it back off on the lathe. Started over and nailed it. The second time I put the shaft in the freezer while I made the second sleeve.

          I could have welded the shaft and machined it, but I wouldn’t have wanted to warp it in the slightest. It was probably some sort of hardened metal, and being the main shaft, I didn’t want to compromise the heat treating.

          Those are pretty much your options, or make a new one. If I was close to you, I’d help you, but that would quite a drive for you to get to Beaumont TX.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
            I sleeved a transmission main shaft a week or so ago. I almost never take pictures, same for this case. Anyway, the shaft went to some obscure ford transmission that was made in Mexico and the speed shop couldn’t find one anywhere. So I had what was for all intents and purposes a one of a kind. All I did was turn the shaft down on the lathe, made a sleeve a couple thou under size, heated it with a torch and slammer her on there quick. The first time I wasn’t quick enough and got half way down before she froze on there. If you’ve ever done a shrink fit, there was no chance of pressing it off. Has to turn it back off on the lathe. Started over and nailed it. The second time I put the shaft in the freezer while I made the second sleeve.

            I could have welded the shaft and machined it, but I wouldn’t have wanted to warp it in the slightest. It was probably some sort of hardened metal, and being the main shaft, I didn’t want to compromise the heat treating.

            Those are pretty much your options, or make a new one. If I was close to you, I’d help you, but that would quite a drive for you to get to Beaumont TX.
            If we were home in Waco I would take it to you. With everything in the wind I don't want to risk mailing them any where. There is a machine shop locally but that is where I spent the $200+ for the two hydraulic cylinder inserts a while back. I suppose it would be worth as long as it goes from my hand to theirs.
            Thank's for the advice guys.

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            • #7
              Something I just thought of, being that’s a fairly low wear item, is a product called marine tex. It’s an epoxy that dries really hard and can be sanded. I’ve used it on a few projects and even watched a guy on the YouTube repair his lathe cross slide dovetail with it. You can get small kits that would be plenty for your application. I would go the buildup and machine or sleeve route, but I also have the machinery to do that. Might be something to consider for your repair.

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              • #8
                Thank's

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