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Utility Trailer Repair

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  • Don52
    replied
    Originally posted by JenLightly View Post
    The repairs look good.

    How old was the trailer when it came in? While the before pictures are pretty telling of the extent of the rust damage, i'm curious as to how long it took to get to that point.
    I would estimate that the trailer is about 10 years old. I did some work on the ramp and the rear latch about 5 years ago. Here is a link to that project.

    Trailer Ramp Repair - Miller Welding Discussion Forums

    I see that this is your first post, welcome to the forum.

    -Don

    Leave a comment:


  • JenLightly
    replied
    The repairs look good.

    How old was the trailer when it came in? While the before pictures are pretty telling of the extent of the rust damage, i'm curious as to how long it took to get to that point.

    Leave a comment:


  • Don52
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    Only repairs I’ve made on metal thinning like that is on metal tube gates. Certainly not nearly the structural issues and disaster potential if a catastrophic failure were to happen.
    You hit the nail on the head. That is my concern. I am not worried about the part I repaired or the weld that attached it to the adjacent tubes. I am worried about some other place that is thin, but didn't break through yet.

    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    Did you do anything to treat the metal on the inside? Something to slow the decay and prevent it on the new steel.
    My brother has the equipment that is used to apply anti-rust spray on the inside of panels like Zebart, which I could borrow. The problem is that these tubes have large sheets of rust on the inside. In order to protect the inside of the tubes, the large sheets of rust and loose rust would have to be removed. It would be better to do this task when the trailer was new. Attached is a picture the sheet rust that I am referring to. It is from a railing, but you get the idea.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	7. Loose rust.JPG Views:	0 Size:	2.92 MB ID:	610223

    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    Good job on the repairs too.
    Thanks,
    Don
    Last edited by Don52; 08-20-2020, 09:21 AM.

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  • Don52
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    That’s a problem I don’t really have here on the gulf coast, but I don’t know how you can get completely away from tubing, especially on the tongue. I supposed you could use some stiff c-channel as a second best.
    Most of the trailers that I have repaired have had channel for the tongue and angle iron for everything else except the ramp, which is typically square tubing. Picture of typical tongue on landscape trailer.
    Click image for larger version

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    Picture of typical ramp. It is made of tubing except the bottom, which is angle iron.
    Click image for larger version

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    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    That’s a problem I don’t really have here on the gulf coast, but I don’t know how you can get completely away from tubing, especially on the tongue. I supposed you could use some stiff c-channel as a second best.

    Only repairs I’ve made on metal thinning like that is on metal tube gates. Certainly not nearly the structural issues and disaster potential if a catastrophic failure were to happen.

    Did you do anything to treat the metal on the inside? Something to slow the decay and prevent it on the new steel?

    Good job on the repairs too.

    Leave a comment:


  • Don52
    replied
    Picture 5 shows the repaired tubes primed
    Click image for larger version  Name:	C12D376D-D647-49B7-B625-7F052B68AD97.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	99.5 KB ID:	610175
    Picture 6 shows the tongue of the trailer with the new jack, the straightened spare tire holder, the side boards replaced and painted.
    Click image for larger version

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    Picture 7 shows the trailer all done.
    Click image for larger version  Name:	42930D58-E312-4F6D-9AED-517996AF5A57.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	140.9 KB ID:	610178
    I have mixed feelings about this repair. Although I repaired the seven holes that were requested, the metal of the tubing is thinned out from internal rust everywhere.


    What are your thoughts?

    -Don
    Last edited by Don52; 08-20-2020, 08:08 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Don52
    started a topic Utility Trailer Repair

    Utility Trailer Repair

    I fixed several rust through holes on a utility trailer for a friend and customer The problem is that the the calcium chloride from the dirt road that he lives on holds moisture, which causes a lot of corrosion. Although I like the rigidity of tubing, I prefer open sections for trailers to allow all sides to be painted. My friend is trying to get a few more years of life from the trailer.

    Notice the external rust on the frame in picture 1.
    Click image for larger version

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    Picture 2 shows one of the seven hole that I repaired.
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    Picture 3 shows the bad metal cut out.
    Click image for larger version

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    in.Picture 4 shows three tubes welded in.
    Click image for larger version

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    Picture 5 shows the back view of the three new tube welded in.
    Click image for larger version

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    Last edited by Don52; 08-20-2020, 08:05 AM.
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