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  • Suggestions on required material for gate build

    Have a client that has had me do a few things for them lately and now asking for a gate for their yard. Ill try and post a drawing of what we are talking about building. He doesn't want it flashy, just simple arched gate, 2 panels so he can open one side for daily use and both when needed for the trailer to go in the back.

    The working room is as follows,
    Gate only (currently wooden) is 107" wide
    Gate and posts included is 115" wide

    So we will be replacing the wooden posts with metal posts to match the gate and support the weight.
    So based on his measurements(still need to go out and take a look myself) each panel will be around 4.25' wide by 6' tall( this would be the top of the arch)

    I found a place that sells 2x2x1/8 square already arched with different rises
    So was looking at building the frame out of 2x2x1/8 or 3/16 the individual pickets from 3/4 square
    Click image for larger version

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    My question is how to determine the post size and how deep to set them?
    I was looking at doing a 3x3x1/4 posts set 3ft deep?? Is that sufficient?
    So i go deeper? How wide should the holes be for the posts?

    Also in order to make it a sound gate, can some of the 2x2's be thinner in thickness for the sides that are not hinged? So on the hinged side do 2x2x3/16 and for the diamond plate support and non-hinged use 2x2x1/8?

    Before i quote him i just want to know what to consider for a gate that is 6ft tall and roughly 9ft wide (2 panels)

    any and all suggestions are greatly appreciated.

  • #2
    I like doing gates........for myself and close friends. On the posts or post, deeper , larger and heavier wall thickness is your friend............last gate I did I convinced my nephew just to go with a single span 14 ' gate.........Why wrestle with two posts and two separate gates that independently want to sag on there own after the concrete or ground settles?............Anyway we went with a single 4"x 4" x .375 wall tube sunk in the ground 4 ft and surrounded by concrete using the weld on grease-able commercial hinges..........now this baby was heavy as we did the frame in 2 x 3 x .188 wall tube and then he covered it on the outside with redwood boards..... and also added an adjustable wheel if it ever sagged ...........10 years later still perfect.

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    • #3
      So waiting to hear back from the client, but i think they want it 2 door design like the picture.
      So i was pricing out the material and how does this sound for the overall material list

      2x2x1/8 Arch
      3/4 sq 16ga for the pickets
      2x2x1/16 sq for the panel sides
      1x1x1/16 sq for the diamond plate support(just the top portion of the rectangle)
      1/8 Diamond Plate (Kick plates)
      3x3x1/4 sq for the posts that will hold and support the gate (cemented 3ft into the ground with 16" wide hole)

      Thoughts? Suggestions? they want it simple, clean not fancy and lightweight...

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      • #4
        I built and installed this gate for my house in 2008. The opening is 11 feet wide and the gates are 70 inches tall. The frame is 1 x 2 x 16 ga, the 4 pickets are 1/2" and the center cross pieces are 1/8" flat bar, 3 and 4 inches wide. The slats are composite wood, which adds a lot of weight to the overall product. I also wanted clean and simple, not too heavy, but not like every other gate you see. The hinges are just some L-bolts and pieces of tubing. This allows for some adjustment when necessary. The only thing I have done in the 12 years since install is adjust the gates if they look a little out of whack. They are overdue for a repaint though. The center flat bars add a lot of rigidity to the gates and keep them from sagging.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Metjunkie View Post
          I built and installed this gate for my house in 2008. The opening is 11 feet wide and the gates are 70 inches tall. The frame is 1 x 2 x 16 ga, the 4 pickets are 1/2" and the center cross pieces are 1/8" flat bar, 3 and 4 inches wide. The slats are composite wood, which adds a lot of weight to the overall product. I also wanted clean and simple, not too heavy, but not like every other gate you see. The hinges are just some L-bolts and pieces of tubing. This allows for some adjustment when necessary. The only thing I have done in the 12 years since install is adjust the gates if they look a little out of whack. They are overdue for a repaint though. The center flat bars add a lot of rigidity to the gates and keep them from sagging.
          Looks nice, spoke with my client and they want square tubing, no rectangle

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          • #6
            Yes, what the customer wants, the customer gets. My gate is just an example of what can be done with thin gauge tubing. Most things I design for myself I try to use as much 16ga. stock as possible. One reason is weight, the other is cost, since we all know metal aint gettin any cheaper.

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            • #7
              I agree on the gauge tubing. Last gate I built, or rebuilt for that matter, was so rusted out and nasty. So whatever you end up using, make sure you leave a way for water to get out if it gets in and pay attention to detail on the finish coating, whatever it is. Break the edges of the metal with a file, etc.

              Smart hinge design metjunkie.

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              • #8
                So the plan is leaving the bottoms of the tubing open for any water or moisture to escape. And client is wanting it painted black, very simple and not so fancy gate for them.

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                • #9
                  2x2 x.120 is fine. Do all miter joints and drill holes for water to get out. Avoid diamond plate, leave that crap for trailer decks.3” or 4” post. Rule of thumb is one third of pole height in ground. You have 8’ above (include height of gate above post) so 32” below ground.

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                  • #10
                    Get the customer to let you have the gate powder coated.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                      Get the customer to let you have the gate powder coated.


                      if this is your first gate stick with paint, it is not so distressing when you have to change something during install due to an oversight.

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                      • #12
                        Client is not looking to spend alot on this gate, so powder coating is not a option for them. The highest point on the gate will be 6ft not 8ft, so shouldnt 3ft be deep enough or overkill for a 6ft post?

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                        • #13
                          Anything over 24” should be good. Dig as small a hole as you can to not disturb the surroundinng dirt. A post hole digger is perfect.

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