Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How to make miter cuts beyond my chop saws capability?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How to make miter cuts beyond my chop saws capability?

    So as stated in a previous thread, I am going to build some car service ramps. The only problem is, the acute angle at the bottom left below requires 2 cuts that are beyond my saws capabilities. My chop saw (Evolution RAGE2) can go up to 45* miter cuts. Since I’m trying to achieve an overall angle of 25*, I will need two 77.5* cuts. So even it I use my protractor to mark the cuts, I would not be able to use my chop saw. Or is there something I’m not thinking about? Or do I use my oxyacetylene torch? Or jig saw? I hope my sketch below makes sense, the parentheses are what I would have to set the saw at to achieve my cuts since a 90* cut on the saw is actually marked as 0*. So how do I attack this? I’m new to fabrication and this problem is stumping me. I’m using 2x2 angle. Help?
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Zip disc and a grinder. Take you a few minutes, go slow and cut straight. You’ll be surgical precision with that grinder before you know it.

    Comment


    • #3
      That’s a good idea too, I hadn’t thought of that but I do have plenty of experience with it. My calculations are correct then?

      Comment


      • #4
        I don’t know, I tried to look at the sketch but I get an error message saying it’s an invalid file. Don’t over-think things. You’re building ramps for your car, not parts for the space shuttle.

        Comment


        • #5
          With that Evolution 2 and a 15" blade you can cut just about any angle or compound angle you need with extreme accuracy if you have the room.....

          2x2 angle should be easy with the basic 14" blade...........in these pictures I'm compound mitering 2x4x.188 rectangular tubing.........now I say extreme accuracy cause it's what I desired to put the pieces all back together on a chassis I did. Probably not necessary for most projects. Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4237_zps4d383861.jpg
Views:	260
Size:	85.5 KB
ID:	606411Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4193_zpsd357549e.jpg
Views:	256
Size:	104.3 KB
ID:	606412Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4203_zpsd76664ec.jpg
Views:	258
Size:	99.9 KB
ID:	606413
          Attached Files

          Comment


          • #6
            Sketch opened OK for me. I have both abrasive and "cold" chop saws, but for a job like this I'd just use the angle grinder zip wheel as Ryan says--much quicker and plenty accurate if you're careful. Your calcs look fine. I would add a vertical member at the "break" from the top surface to the ramp--your design places approx. 50% of the weight at each wheel on the welds at that angle joint. With 2x2 angle, assuming adequate thickness, it should be just fine if you're a good welder. But the extra cost and weight of adding strength in the Y axis there is well worth it, in my estimation. Better safe than sorry. But then, I'm a belt and suspenders guy. Just my two cents worth.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post
              Sketch opened OK for me. I have both abrasive and "cold" chop saws, but for a job like this I'd just use the angle grinder zip wheel as Ryan says--much quicker and plenty accurate if you're careful. Your calcs look fine. I would add a vertical member at the "break" from the top surface to the ramp--your design places approx. 50% of the weight at each wheel on the welds at that angle joint. With 2x2 angle, assuming adequate thickness, it should be just fine if you're a good welder. But the extra cost and weight of adding strength in the Y axis there is well worth it, in my estimation. Better safe than sorry. But then, I'm a belt and suspenders guy. Just my two cents worth.
              I plan to add more bracing vertically and then of course there will be pieces horizontally that the car will ride up on. Right now I’m just trying to get the basic framework down.

              tarry99 I wish I had that kind of room to fit in all kinds of vises and stuff but that would probably just confuse me more. And the time I would spend setting it up would probably be longer than just marking it by hand and using the cut off wheel.

              Comment


              • #8
                Acooljt, I'm guessing you don't have a portaband, but I've used mine for many a cut that wasn't in the range of angles on my Rage 4. I actually prefer the portaband over my chop saw.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The phone app doesn’t always seem to work as well as the web browser.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    After looking at your sketch on a web browser, I think at least those two angle joints on the bottom are unnecessary. Doesn’t make it wrong, just makes it more work for you.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                      After looking at your sketch on a web browser, I think at least those two angle joints on the bottom are unnecessary. Doesn’t make it wrong, just makes it more work for you.
                      What would you do instead? I’ve gotta do something or the angle won’t fit together correctly.

                      Also, just added a portaband to my “wanted” list.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        @acooljt
                        change the angles and cap the one open end

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I would also slope the front verticals to resist having the ramps flip forward when you stop on the top and maybe splay the bottom sideways as well to increase stability.

                          ---Meltedmetal
                          ---Meltedmetal

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Meltedmetal View Post
                            I would also slope the front verticals to resist having the ramps flip forward when you stop on the top and maybe splay the bottom sideways as well to increase stability.

                            ---Meltedmetal
                            You’d have to draw me a sketch because I’m not very good at visualizing.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Make the footprint(bottom rectangle)under the top support(where your tire will rest) larger than the top rectangle. That is, the supporting legs should all slope outward from the top rectangle which should be centered over the bottom rectangle. Just like most kitchen chairs. It adds stability. The end with the ramp is stabilized by the ramp. Take a cereal box lay it on it's side and push down an slightly forward near the end of the box. See how easily you can tip it. That is the motion your car will apply to your ramp when you drive up and apply the brakes. You don't want your ramp to flip forward.
                              It will make your cuts a bit more complex. Just my opinion and its worth what you paid for it.

                              ---Meltedmetal
                              ---Meltedmetal

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X