Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Trellis Repair

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Ya Don, nice fix; and as always, great documentation.

    Leave a comment:


  • aametalmaster
    replied
    Nice fix

    Leave a comment:


  • Don52
    replied
    To solve the problem, I just welded the adjacent joints to bubble out the impurities in them. In the following picture you can see that both the original and the adjacent welds are much cleaner. I also welded the remaining two legs, because they also had welds with minimal penetration as well.

    6. Cleaner weld

    Click image for larger version

Name:	6. Cleaner weld.jpg
Views:	238
Size:	40.1 KB
ID:	605542

    The last step was to paint the trellis.

    7. All Done

    Click image for larger version

Name:	7. All Done.jpg
Views:	225
Size:	54.6 KB
ID:	605543

    Sometimes the less used oxyacetylene process works best for an application like this.

    -Don

    Leave a comment:


  • Don52
    started a topic Trellis Repair

    Trellis Repair

    A coworker asked me to repair his wife's plant trellis, which had two broken legs as shown below.

    1. Trellis with broken legs

    Click image for larger version

Name:	1. Trellis with broken legs.jpg
Views:	275
Size:	77.2 KB
ID:	605536

    When I inspected the broken weld on the leg, I noticed that the weld only penetrated about 1/3 of the way through the leg. In the following picture you can see the rusty cracked weld, which had minimal penetration.

    2. Rust on broken weld

    Click image for larger version

Name:	2. Rust on broken weld.jpg
Views:	228
Size:	48.0 KB
ID:	605537

    First I removed the rust and paint from the legs in preparation for welding.

    3. Cleaned up legs

    Click image for larger version

Name:	3. Cleaned up legs.jpg
Views:	212
Size:	105.0 KB
ID:	605538

    Next I cleaned up the joint as shown below.

    4. Cleaned up joint

    Click image for larger version

Name:	4. Cleaned up joint.jpg
Views:	235
Size:	59.3 KB
ID:	605539
    I chose the oxyacetylene process for this application, because it is the most tolerant process for contamination. I cleaned as best that I could, but there was still some contamination in the joints that I couldn't easily get to. As you can see in the following picture the weld has a little contamination on the surface from the adjacent joints.

    5. Contamination on weld

    Click image for larger version

Name:	5. Contamination on weld.jpg
Views:	198
Size:	91.8 KB
ID:	605540
Working...
X