Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

council building iron loft made at home

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • pietromarruggio
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN5164.JPG
Views:	88
Size:	873.6 KB
ID:	605457Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN5165.JPG
Views:	72
Size:	708.1 KB
ID:	605458Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN5166.JPG
Views:	71
Size:	954.9 KB
ID:	605459Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN5167.JPG
Views:	74
Size:	684.8 KB
ID:	605460
    I'm basking and setting up the structure, if I'm wrong let me know thanks I will put photos of the work in progress in progress, thanks for the right advice and collaboration.

    Leave a comment:


  • pietromarruggio
    replied
    thanks your precise suggestions I believe that the structure that I will have to build will have to support supporting a weight equivalent to 500 kg distributed by five square meters, you understand well I would not like it to collapse like a castle of playing cards, thank you

    Click image for larger version

Name:	struttura.jpg
Views:	78
Size:	99.9 KB
ID:	605323Click image for larger version

Name:	pianale.jpg
Views:	82
Size:	83.3 KB
ID:	605324

    https://www.svelt.it/it/prodotti/sop...cciaio-t15-528


    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    I think you'll be able to gain a lot of design knowledge by looking at Baker Scaffold.
    http://www.scaffoldingdepot.com/scaf...s-scaffold.htm

    This product has been in use for over 60 years I have direct knowledge of and I have yet to see a section collapse.
    Baker puts strength in the vital corners and Baker doesn't collapse from corner failures.

    Leave a comment:


  • pietromarruggio
    replied
    thanks precious intervention, I believe the interior wall can be used to support the beams, but at least two riser columns must be placed in front to unload the weight on the ground, I had thought of using a 100x50 x 3 mm thick metal box. I create a portal on which to place the beams. maybe if I can put some photos to make corrections changes. unfortunately the maneuvering space is minimal thanks for the right advice and suggestions.


    Click image for larger version

Name:	tubo-rettangolo-300x240.gif
Views:	97
Size:	2.4 KB
ID:	605307http://www.moltenifratelli.it/tubi-rettangolari/

    Click image for larger version

Name:	struttura tubolare.jpg
Views:	115
Size:	111.3 KB
ID:	605306

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    Watched a very similar in a building full of steel shelving. The erector of the shelving left the back sheets off because they weren't needed and would require extra work to install.
    A few years downline no plumbbob was needed to see the skew.
    I suggested pulling the shelves back in line employing a coffin hoist to the roof bar joist.

    The owner chose to employ clothesline to hold what existed, after all, jacking the shelves back straight might take them overcenter and collapse them.
    I'm pretty sure he had no idea of the strength of clothesline, and I know he didn't know how to tie knots. Might explain why he wore loafers.
    He arrived one morning to find several rows of shelving leaning into a concrete block wall and called to ask if I could jack them back straight.
    Sure, get all the inventory off and call me when you've accomplished that.

    Box stores with 30 feet of inventory stacked high worry me. Pallet racking has no capacity to retain the laterals when stressed from either end. Racking is designed to go together fast with unskilled help. Fortunately it can be cut apart and welded into nice structurals for home projects.
    Triangles and braces are more mportant to a structure than mass is.

    Leave a comment:


  • Noel
    replied
    Originally posted by pietromarruggio View Post
    hello I should make a loft 2 meters high 2.50 meters long 2, 30 meters some advice, as you would do with a little money thanks
    All the discussion was sucking my will to follow but the recent picture of the working space, should have posted that before. That's an added " Wow, that's interesting" .

    lateral push demolishes the brick wall.
    I say when it doubt rule it out or forget about it, add legs and bracing as Franz mentioned. Anchor into the floor, couple in the wall for good measure and call it a day. Wood or steel. Screws and nail, bolts and welding, just don't forget to brace or gussets.

    Not being an engineer, my thinking is, it's collapse from weight compressing isn't a concern, but collapse from deflection whether in the strength of the material not up to the weight and deflecting, or weight on the material and a force being applied causing it to move by deflection.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i8YdMhCEqsQ

    My thoughts are if the wall it going to be used, bolt through it not into it.

    Leave a comment:


  • pietromarruggio
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	capannone 1 falda.jpg
Views:	199
Size:	41.1 KB
ID:	605254
    Click image for larger version

Name:	larghezza locale interno.jpg
Views:	174
Size:	29.0 KB
ID:	605255Click image for larger version

Name:	locale.jpg
Views:	179
Size:	43.5 KB
ID:	605256Click image for larger version

Name:	schema.jpg
Views:	175
Size:	10.4 KB
ID:	605257

    what do you think about it? how to make it more robust? thanks sorry if I insist thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • pietromarruggio
    replied
    I'm afraid it falls like a house of cards, maybe the lateral push demolishes the brick wall. prudence is never too much

    Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN5156.JPG
Views:	188
Size:	727.6 KB
ID:	605250Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN5157.JPG
Views:	169
Size:	665.9 KB
ID:	605251Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN5158.JPG
Views:	175
Size:	734.0 KB
ID:	605252
    the place is not bright we cannot make a virtual inspection of the images. thanks anyway for some valuable advice.

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    Your load won't be distributed on the 4.5 sq meters, it will be on the total area of the 4 feet. The concrete floor will distribute the load some IF the concrete is reinforced.

    Leave a comment:


  • pietromarruggio
    replied
    diagonal reinforcement elements for building scaffolding or bridge tie rods. thank you sorry if I disturbed you. by eye a box-shaped 100x50x 3 mm how much could I load it, the whole floor as surface would be 4.5 square meters, what maximum load could it bear? thank you sorry if I disturbed you. Click image for larger version

Name:	rack.jpg
Views:	206
Size:	20.5 KB
ID:	605230
    Click image for larger version

Name:	orditura traverse.jpg
Views:	185
Size:	15.4 KB
ID:	605231Click image for larger version

Name:	scaffale.jpg
Views:	187
Size:	18.8 KB
ID:	605232Click image for larger version

Name:	pallett rack mezzanino.jpg
Views:	182
Size:	93.8 KB
ID:	605233

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    The purple elements are what you need to add.
    They introduce triangles into the structure and triangles do NOT deflect unless the length of one leg changes.
    The elements reduce stress on your existing joints and will prevent collapse.
    They don't need to be heavy material.

    Leave a comment:


  • pietromarruggio
    replied
    you could kindly attach some drawings thanks. I have to figure out how to distribute the loads like unloading the weight evenly on the ground, otherwise everything collapses thanks


    Click image for larger version

Name:	images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSkT0HsIU0luu2j0laLt58myyuhOeP33sPfHT_FfXI5E7FyMqOq&s.jpg
Views:	195
Size:	5.7 KB
ID:	605206Click image for larger version

Name:	images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSwXrXs0vR_13E_UTPO0CmqfN7fo4qcgpubvG2JT6_jY8k-cfOZEw&s.jpg
Views:	192
Size:	6.8 KB
ID:	605207

    Click image for larger version

Name:	green-and-orange-storage-concepts-freestanding-shelving-units-ib42120-40108s-64_1000.jpg
Views:	193
Size:	43.2 KB
ID:	605209


    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Storage-...108S/305650799



    https://www.bunnings.com.au/steel-de...frame_p0910821
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    Essentially you're building a pallet rack, but you're leaving out the vital diagonal component of the structure making it vulnerable.

    Relying only on the welded joint is disaster waiting to happen.

    Even minimal 1/8 x 1 strapping welded in as diagonals would increase the safety of the system by creating triangles.

    Leave a comment:


  • pietromarruggio
    replied
    thanks for the precise suggestions, I enclose sketch drawing with measurements that I took today, Click image for larger version

Name:	loft.jpg
Views:	238
Size:	18.4 KB
ID:	605141Click image for larger version

Name:	altillo.jpg
Views:	207
Size:	20.5 KB
ID:	605142


    pralicamente the beam would be like amplitude between the supports 250 cm, height 190 cm, length 180 cm
    all in centimeters, as a material I would like to use box-shaped 100x 50 x 3 mm iron thickness both for the three riser columns and for the three 250 cm beams, what do you say on the one hand the housing on the brick wall 30 cm thick, from the Otherwise I hold up the uprights that bolt to the wall 18 centimeters thick and to the floor what you say. Is the roof 350 cm high from the ground? if you have other suggestions let me know, thanks for the sustenance
    Click image for larger version

Name:	scatolati-rett.gif
Views:	206
Size:	2.9 KB
ID:	605143



    https://www.oppo.it/tabelle/profilati-tubi-rettang.htm


    http://www.albaedile.it/prodotto/fer...50x3-mm-l-6-m/
    Click image for larger version

Name:	32000-20bb14546cdc2399eac3dd2a6cd3c465.jpg
Views:	208
Size:	43.4 KB
ID:	605144Click image for larger version

Name:	32001-650ebcce865eaffe1d3f3d80744ac207.jpg
Views:	193
Size:	54.9 KB
ID:	605145

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    Eliminate the legs at the wall and lag that sill to the wall. That alone provides a huge improvement in structural integrity.
    Relocate the stairs to the face of the deck and make them pullup eliminating the stairs obstructing the doorway and gaining deck space along with more structural integrity by bolting a second sill to that wall.
    Weld tabs for the diaphragm braces direct to the legs and eliminate the clamp system that sticks beyond the deck and will either become an attempted hanger or a flesh ripper.
    PAD the braces to height of 7 feet above the floor with either styrofoam or several layers of carpet to minimize concussions.
    If this is supposedly moveable in the future frame deck corners with leg pockets of 2½" pipe at least 8" long with 2 setscrews to retain the legs.
    Chamfer feet of the legs to save tripping on them
    All diaphragm braces must go from leg to deck sill for maximum value.
    Without proper diaphragm bracing it's a parallelogram waiting to collapse.
    If possible at least 1 anchor should penetrate the foot and go 2" into the concrete.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X