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Antique Back Hoe Repair

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  • Franz©
    replied
    Might be the smallest tractorhoe in the company, but it's the proudest.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Well if you end up looking to replace it, I haven’t found any better than metabo. They’re also easy to work on if you manage to break it. They have (at least mine do) and a thermal overload that will **** it down so you don’t melt something that can’t be replaced.

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  • Chris401
    replied
    Blows air, I figured the brushes are likely it. Might need to brake it in some. Picked up the pneumatic die grinder and finished the job.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    If it’s getting hot, the cooling fan may also be damaged. One of my small grinders was getting hot a while back and the plastic fan had a couple fins broken off. Easy to replace and cheap. But like stated above, the condition of the brushes is also a likely culprit.

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  • Franz©
    replied
    gets hot not good. How are the brushes and comutator?
    Yours might now weigh 28 pounds without wheel either. Concrete blocks make wonderful tool balancers.

    The 9 is a Milwaukee

    I'll see if I can get pictures of some older ones, like the Montgummery Ward Powercraft from 62 or the ancient Black & Deckers.
    Might be a while till I get ambition enough to go thru the snow.

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  • Chris401
    replied
    No problem. I have all the tools pictured. Maybe a little more paint on them. Give me another 20 years, I'll catch up. Your straight grinder is not a Chicago version. Mine gets hot to the touch after a few minutes. It won't be around as long as the grey one. What brand is it?

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Ok troll.

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  • Franz©
    replied
    9" is 27" per revolution, 7" is 21" per revolution 4" is 12" per revolution. Little grinder gotta spin longer to do the same amount of grinding.

    Quite a bit like fire hoses 2bugles.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Its always that way, the best bead is the last. Might be because you’re really happy it’s all over. Unless you’re Franz. He’s perfect from start to finish. At least that’s what he wants you to believe. A 4” grinder will be fine for your project if that’s all you have. Actually, it’ll be fine for nearly everything you’ll ever do, unless you’re building ships or laying truck loads of pipe.

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  • Franz©
    replied
    Young man, are you talking about grinders, or them cute little toenail pedicurin tools all the kids yapp on about?

    The straight one will spin an 8" wheel all day, and the angle one will spin 9 inchers.
    Notice they don't ride around with wheels on them to give the dummy clinging to the handles a chance of survival.

    The black tool on the bottom is an air chisel.

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  • Chris401
    replied
    I do not weld enough to be proficient but the beads start looking pretty decent the last couple of runs. The more I weld the better I am with a grinder.
    To be continued after we pay taxes this year.
    Thanks

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  • Franz©
    replied
    Whole story is right here in this picture.
    The lower pipe was cut & beveled
    Whoever drove the glue gun NEVER got sufficient penetration on the lower half.
    The plug is a secondary malfunction to insure failure.

    It's all repairable with a buzzbox and torch. Grinder might be real helpful too.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Oh ya, man you can totally fix that with what you have. You can make those pipe bevels with your torch too. If you’ve never done it, I’d practice some before you do it on the pipe. Goodness man, you have plenty of power in that buzz box to run the rod you need.

    Get a fresh, sealed can of low hydrogen rod and get after it. Keep in mind, a bigger rod isn’t always the key. Sometimes, especially when you have a tight bevel, you can’t get in there with a fat rod. So make you gap the work so whatever rod you get you’ll be able to get in there and burn into the root.

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  • Franz©
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris401 View Post
    Just a torch set and my 295 amp cracker box welder.
    Started there in 1955. You CAN do a lot with them, it just takes more time.

    The weld isn't in the machine, it's in the head of the man behind the mask and it's made before the arc is struck.
    Learning is more a function of screwups and recovering from them than it is a function of reading books. Learning is easiest when somebody is looking over your shoulder telling you STOP. Knowing when to STOP is more critical than any other instruction. It keeps you from having to pick the gob of molten metal off the floor and fill the hole you made.

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  • Chris401
    replied
    Just a torch set and my 295 amp cracker box welder.

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