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  • blacksmith forge do it yourself tips suggestions examples

    hello, I would like to create a small forge to heat metals using recycled materials, to chisel accepted chisels and other blacksmith jobs, as you advise me to do it. better to gas or to firewood, as an anvil to beat over? any suitable recovery items? thanks for collaboration . would you have pictures of realizations and artifacts already built? Thanks again Click image for larger version

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    https://nopanic.fr/dossier/diy-fabriquer-une-forge/

    http://masuyo.over-blog.com/article-...-46236344.html Click image for larger version

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  • #2
    You can buy small gas forges fairly cheap. I don’t think I would consider a wood fired forge.

    As far as the anvil, just buy one. Anything you can make them out of will likely not be large enough or stable enough. I have made two out of old rail tracks. They’re fine for little heatin and beatin, but for something you need to pound on with the fury of Thor, you need a real
    Anvil.

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    • #3
      today I made this brazier this little furnace seems to cook chestnuts, what do you think, how could I improve it to make it functional? what do you think the use or throw it in the wreckage? Click image for larger version

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      • #4
        Use that as a forge? Not unless you’re planning to smith on nails. What are you trying to forge anyway?

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        • #5
          chisels blades a few tips for levers to move weights what could I use as a temporary fortune anvil?

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          • #6
            For small things you can get by with a piece of rail road track or even a heavy block of steel. It would be a good idea to build some sort of a stand for it because you need it to be stable. If your anvil moves when you whomp on it, then the force of your blows are not being taken advantage of for smithing.

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            • #7
              I also have a 10 kg bat 20 pounds I think I read in the book that the anvil must be heavier at least 8 times the hammer weight of the mallet therefore 10x 8 is 80 kg would require a 100 kg anvil at least to absorb the blows for the solicitation to resilience, a quintal are so much stuff, I should recover a heavy object at old iron scrap dealer 220 lbs


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              • #8
                I don’t know anything about the size rule, but you can’t go wrong by going bigger on an anvil.

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                • #9
                  Bug anvils require more warmup if they are in a cold area.

                  Stand resiliance-v- solid mount is one of the longer arguments in Smithing.

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                  • #10
                    due to the resilience stress the anvil must be at least eight times heavier than the hammer must absorb the blows. believe that just add the bellows or I have to improve the brazier, a few suggestions, thanks

                    https://www.bricoportale.it/fai-da-t...iare-il-ferro/
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                    https://www.wikihow.it/Costruire-una-Forgia-per-Metalli




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                    • #11
                      The theory of the anvil needing to be 8x the mass of the hammer was probably invented by some cow ledge punk wearing a lab coat playing with his hammer.

                      For years I've carried in the truck an 8" length of RR track that weighs about 20 pounds. It's served well as an anvil multiple times and had no problem being the counteracting element when a 10 pound hammer was doing the hitting.
                      Anvils do not absorb energy, they conduct energy to the next element in the chain, usually a stump or wood block. Each link in the impact chain generally attenuates force delivered to the successive element by increasing surface area.

                      For simplicity of numbers, lets saya 10 pound hammer delivers 100 pounds of impact to the anvil across 1 square inch of anvil face. The anvil then transmits the force to the stump across the 4 by 6 inch anvil base reducing impact force to around 4 pounds per square inch at the intersection of anvil & stump. If the stump is 10" x 10" that impact force will be reaching the floor at mere ounces of impact energy per square inch.

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                      • #12
                        unfortunately I am not a mechanical engineer, I do not have the right skills to be able to compare your theory, very interesting, I think I will consult some technology books, what do other user friends think?


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                        • #13
                          Get the best beating surface you can find and put it on a stable base. It’s an anvil, not a piano. A heavier anvil on a stable base will always be better than anything else of lesser value in either category.

                          I have no idea on the equations for hammer vs. anvil weight plus the price of rice in China. You just need a solid surface to whomp on.

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                          • #14
                            You guys think the math of minimizing force transmitted to earth requires engineering you both need to get back to remedial 6th grade fast.

                            The caped lawn waterer must have got his bugles in Cheerios cause he sure never looked at the outriggers on a ladder.

                            The wrld will be best served by neither of you touching a tool

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                            • #15
                              I don’t believe I said anything about math, that would be you, hero. But I think you’re doing a fine job of turning a discussion about a stinkin whompin block into waste of time. But that seems to be your mission on the forum. Just because you’re under achieved and under skilled doesn’t mean that the rest of us are. You’re a key board commando and a phony. A has-been at best but most likely a never-could-be. It should be you that never touches a tool. But go ahead, blabber away.

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