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Creating A Transmission Bolt Boss On An Engine

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  • #16
    Ya man, good luck with the modification. Let me know if I can help you at all. I’ve laid out about all I got to help with, so give a holler.

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    • #17
      http://ford-mel-engine.com/viewtopic.php?f=18&t=1687 wow lots of good reading there...Bob
      Bob Wright

      Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
      http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

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      • #18
        All the good I see it doing, just swing by the pottery shop, use some clay to make a mold and go Thermite on it.
        Save a lot of time.

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        • #19
          Ya sure, that totally sounds like a time saver. Make a mold out of clay....probably at least 30 seconds for Franz, a week for everyone else. Fire off some thermite on the side of your engine block....what could possibly go wrong? I mean, thermite only melts rail road tracks together. Considering you only need something built up about the size of a half dollar, you should totally do this. It would be like driving a thumb tack with a freight train, and who doesn’t want to do that? But....it would be an adventure.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
            Ya sure, that totally sounds like a time saver. Make a mold out of clay....probably at least 30 seconds for Franz, a week for everyone else. Fire off some thermite on the side of your engine block....what could possibly go wrong? I mean, thermite only melts rail road tracks together. Considering you only need something built up about the size of a half dollar, you should totally do this. It would be like driving a thumb tack with a freight train, and who doesn’t want to do that? But....it would be an adventure.
            Shall I just interpret that to mean "I Ryan have never done a Thermite weld, I have no idea of the process or hos it's done thousands of times each day, but since I have a bugle in each hand I just gotta blow"?
            Ever walk along a rail and notice the jumpers welded at the joints with Thermite gobs about the size of a half inch nut? Pretty safe bet you never welded a ground wire to the ground rod in a porcelain cup about the size of a shot glass.

            Funny thing is if I wasn't 99% confident I could make the weld I wouldn't have mentioned it 2bugles, but you go right ahead and de-enlighten the masses.
            I'll even set up a ground connection and fire it if you promise to pee in the cup while it's burning.

            Honestly, how many EEOC and Military points did you use to get the 2 bugles?

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            • #21
              Don’t be jealous volley.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                Don’t be jealous volley.
                What's to be jealous of Union Civil Service W-2 boy?

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                • #23
                  Because you couldn’t make it as professional, maybe nobody would hire you, maybe you couldn’t pass the test....just be proud of whatever it is you’re good at. That’s all.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                    Because you couldn’t make it as professional, maybe nobody would hire you, maybe you couldn’t pass the test....just be proud of whatever it is you’re good at. That’s all.
                    Sorry little IAFF W-2 fellow, you're wrong again.
                    City refused to allow me to write the test on the grounds they wouldn't accept a man who walked and climbed with a gimp stick.
                    They were also very intolerant of returning Nam Vets in the 70s, part of a national attitude.

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                    • #25
                      Travis,
                      Sorry I just seen this. This is the kind of stuff I cut my teeth on years ago.
                      I love what you're doing here.
                      I would personally cut the corner of and use the FE stuff if it will work. By that I question if the balance on the FE and the Lincoln is the same. If there are no external weights on either automatic flywheels then you should be ok, or if they match also.

                      That being said I would carefully drill and tap that hole and use a stud not a bolt. Just make sure its in tight. That would be much stronger for you application even if you did the build up.
                      I have built up places like that with either the bronze or many times with nickel rod too. But if you use the stud you may completely dodge a bullet here anyways.
                      Hope you see this....good luck

                      www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
                      Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
                      MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
                      Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
                      Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

                      Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
                      Miller 30-A Spoolgun
                      Miller WC-115-A
                      Miller Spectrum 300
                      Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
                      Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

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                      • #26
                        I put some new pictures up. There is less block centered on the bolt than what I remembered. I had considered a stud there. Although it would be a pain to deal with when on a complete truck it is an option.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post

                          It seems to me you’re asking how to build up that area off the block to have enough metal to drill into. I’ve done a few build ups for things needing holes drilled and tapped, but never an engine block. But I can’t really see the difference other than making sure the back is decked off flat. Assuming it’s cast iron, the only material I’d recommend, and what has worked for me in the past, is tig braze aluminum bronze on AC. You’ll need AC because of the aluminum content of the filler. Work slow enough to heat the base metal and flow the filler but not enough to melt the base metal. Once you get the base pad flowed onto the block, the build up will be so easy you could probably get your 10 year old nephew to do it.
                          I added more pictures to the MEL Engine Forum. There is less block to work with than I remembered. Is the tig brazed aluminum softer than the cast iron? Due to the new hole location the drill big would likely walk into the softer metal. It if it would hold with a bolt split between fuesd metals it should work.

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                          • #28
                            Franz and Ryan take you THING out back and beat the tar out of each other, shake hands and be done with it. PLEASE! Not conducive to a good thread with real questions that need real answers. Fusion king NICE idea with using a stud. I was going to suggest a little ni rod but really don't like welding on old blocks that aren't already cracked.

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                            • #29
                              You’re right, OGD.

                              Chris, I have drilled and tapped partially in both before and you’re right, it could walk into the softer material. Somehow, I managed to keep it inline as far as I could tell, but that job was a set screw, so the location wasn’t that critical. I have welded cast iron with nickel rod but never done build up with nickel rod. I have drilled through some nickel rod and it was not a pleasant job, that stuff is hard. I would recommend a cobalt drill and go easy. But if you screw it up you could always fill it back in with braze metal and give it a go again. You may need to use a stubby bit like a hougen style but on a mag drill or even in a drill press, or better yet, a vertical mill. Something to keep it all from moving. Might consider having a machine shop do it.

                              Tapping a hole in that bronze feels very “gummy” to me, very much different than cast.

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                              • #30
                                Thanks, With fuesd metals I was not going to try it free handed. There is a machinist down the road that should be able to do it on a lathe. He took one of these engines and made a little 550 ci. Would like to see what it does once the cam situation is worked out.

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