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heavy duty work table

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  • Oldgrandad
    replied
    You can do it Ryan just take your phone, turn on the camera, aim it at the table, and push the little round dot. I know you can do it. It's easier than welding and you've got that down.

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  • FusionKing
    replied
    Mail him a polaroid pic of it !!

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Oh man, I’m terrible at that.

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  • Oldgrandad
    replied
    On second thought it will cost you, I demand at least one picture of the finished product.

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  • Oldgrandad
    replied
    No plagiarizing, it's your's. Even though it took me hour's on the computer to draw that up I'll let you it have for nothing but a little advice on a project TBD down the road.
    Last edited by Oldgrandad; 08-21-2019, 12:20 PM.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    1/2” is the plan and I am going to plagiarize the living daylights out of your CAD drawing. Thanks for that!

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  • Oldgrandad
    replied
    1/4" table top, unless you back it 100% will look like an ocean scene in no time at all. Full of waves. It's just not thick enough to handle any kind of heavy work. 1/2" plate can be point loaded with an enormous amount of weight in the center of a 42" square, unsupported area, and not permanently deflect. Can't say the same for 1/4". But I do like a good strong support frame under my table tops. As seen in the drawing on post #12.

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  • Franz©
    replied
    Originally posted by Sberry View Post
    First is size, then thick. I might go with 2 wheels on one end and tab to move the other with a floor jack. The internet craze is tube steel for frame but I like angle better and can do a bench with all square cuts.
    What you got against flat stock and 4" pipe legs Carey? 50% of the strength of angle is wasted on a table.

    Purpose over pretty employing trussing makes the build simple. This table will be rolling on an epoxy coated floor, and we both know how long epoxy lasts on shop floors. Customer wants wheeled, builder will get blamed for wheel damage to the floor and unless the table is set up to autolock in place when a braking device is held by the table pusher probably eat liability for table crashes as well.
    Table carrying a 4000 pound load better incorporate cargo retention devices as well or the builder will get blamed for whatever fell off.

    A build of this nature should include propulsion such as Slob's system for moving his shop gantry, and safetys as well.
    Without written specifications and expectations this is a bomb building project most Insurance Carriers will spend a fortune claiming they didn't cover such jobs in the scope of the Policy.

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  • johnsnowkornar
    replied
    Originally posted by Dmaxer View Post
    Methinks the casters for use on a table rolling on an epoxied slab, which will weigh over 1500 lbs bare and hold four times as much should be rated at 3500 lbs or more. Maybe something like this https://www.casterconcepts.com/caste...omaxx-casters/ A Table Saw (just the product of research, I'm not affiliated). Good luck.
    Great value and a solid piece for use as a laptop cart. It rolls well !!

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  • Sberry
    replied
    First is size, then thick. I might go with 2 wheels on one end and tab to move the other with a floor jack. The internet craze is tube steel for frame but I like angle better and can do a bench with all square cuts.
    Last edited by Sberry; 08-19-2019, 09:30 AM.

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  • Noel
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    Gracias guys. Thanks for the input.

    Noel, a friend of mine around the corner has a big table with 3/4” steel top, 4x8. All it has are four legs welded to the bottom. That table is ridiculously bouncy when you try to whomp on something. Might be ok for light work though. He’s a machinist and uses it mostly for laying out work sequence junk. You know, all that fancy machine work doodads.
    This was why I suggested it wasn't the thickness of the top but what supports it. 1/4" plate should be plenty thick enough if the frame that supports it is well thought out. While I'm guessing they calculate load between joist spacing, I'm also guessing another approach is to double up the top thickness to accomplish the same thing if the legs hold things up right.

    You're the engineer on this one. Your the guy who's going to tag his name to form, function, as well cost. But if you look at how a deck trailer is built, they haul a whole D9 Cat not just a transmission. And they don't usually plate it all in 1/2" or better. Just sharing ideas for your consideration. You are the Engineer On Record on this job, good luck with that.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    This is the formula I have saved and use to calculate the weight of steel plate:

    Steel plate weight per sq. ft.

    W=weight of steel plate lb/sq ft
    T=plate thickness

    W=40.8(t)

    Example: 1/4" plate steel weight sq ft

    W=40.8(.25)
    W=10.2

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Gracias guys. Thanks for the input.

    Noel, a friend of mine around the corner has a big table with 3/4” steel top, 4x8. All it has are four legs welded to the bottom. That table is ridiculously bouncy when you try to whomp on something. Might be ok for light work though. He’s a machinist and uses it mostly for laying out work sequence junk. You know, all that fancy machine work doodads.

    Leave a comment:


  • Noel
    replied
    I'm no engineer but what ever happened to supporting under the table top?

    1/2"...5/8"...3/4" plate? What's the purpose behind that? Beside dead weight and effort to lift it, where is the value in such a heavy top plate surface? I will guess with no center supports, a thicker plate offer less deflection but again, that's a compensation for designing less support for the top to sit on.




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  • Dmaxer
    replied
    Methinks the casters for use on a table rolling on an epoxied slab, which will weigh over 1500 lbs bare and hold four times as much should be rated at 3500 lbs or more. Maybe something like this https://www.casterconcepts.com/caste...omaxx-casters/ (just the product of research, I'm not affiliated). Good luck.

    Leave a comment:

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