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heavy duty work table

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  • MAC702
    replied
    I fire a couple customers every year. I get enough business to not deal with them.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I bet most of you guys have had “that” customer at some point. I think this guy is mine. I’ve never fired a customer before. This is the third time he’s had me spec out this work table, we met on Friday to approve the drawing, shook hands on the deal and he backed out (again) yesterday evening. He’s done this on a few other jobs too. I even showed up for a job one morning and he “forgot” to tell me he had it done the day before. So I told him we can’t do business anymore. I hate to be like that, but I won’t starve without his business.

    Thank you guys for all the suggestions, I’ve filed them away for future use.

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  • tarry99
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	levelingfeet.jpg
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ID:	606229 Anytime I think of a forklift moving something I think part of that process is sliding the object along the ground on a hard surface ? I know cause I've driven many over the years........So rubber may not be the best lasting solution unless your forklift driver understands what's at stake?........might be that steel pads with the 4 sides kicked up to 30 degrees +/- may be a better option?

    I have also worked with Polyurethane bushings in suspension systems for bump stops that can take a lasting beating quite well and live far and beyond any rubber life in the same use and still have excellent memory.........but then again may also not like the potential lateral scuffing movement mentioned above. .https://www.energysuspensionparts.co...bump-stops.asp....

    Another option I've used on HD benches is these leveling feet.....works well in conjunction with casters or when there is a need to level a bench or fixture after moving it....in the pictures I use 1" Acme thread for the jacks and then attach the feet which are quite robust.
    https://reidsupply.com/feet-casters-...base/tl-3.html

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Not a bad idea, maybe they come in different thicknesses. I’ll take a look at McMaster-Carr.

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  • MMW
    replied
    Might be to thick but loading dock bumpers came to mind for rubber feet.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    This customer does not want it on casters. He wants to move it around with his fork lift. I’ll need to fasten plastic or rubber pads to the bottom of the feet.

    This table will be split in half...one half at normal height the other much lower for whompin on dump truck hubs. I have to fabricate a fixture into the lower end for holding the hubs.

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  • tarry99
    replied
    I'm in the process of building another welding bench...........48"x 96"x .750" HR plate.....rolling on 5 or 6" casters. I'll be boring 5/8" holes in a pattern for clamping fixtures.......it will also have slide out extensions on all 4 sides to allow for the table / bench to grow if needed....Picking the right caster wheel hardness is important based on weight and the surface it will be used on...........also on casters , static brakes & and the ability to lock the caster body out from turning when needed should also be considered.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I’m back on this job, so hopefully I get the “go ahead” from my customer today. Should be a good winter job for me here.

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  • Oldgrandad
    replied
    You can do it Ryan just take your phone, turn on the camera, aim it at the table, and push the little round dot. I know you can do it. It's easier than welding and you've got that down.

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  • FusionKing
    replied
    Mail him a polaroid pic of it !!

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Oh man, I’m terrible at that.

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  • Oldgrandad
    replied
    On second thought it will cost you, I demand at least one picture of the finished product.

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  • Oldgrandad
    replied
    No plagiarizing, it's your's. Even though it took me hour's on the computer to draw that up I'll let you it have for nothing but a little advice on a project TBD down the road.
    Last edited by Oldgrandad; 08-21-2019, 11:20 AM.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    1/2” is the plan and I am going to plagiarize the living daylights out of your CAD drawing. Thanks for that!

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  • Oldgrandad
    replied
    1/4" table top, unless you back it 100% will look like an ocean scene in no time at all. Full of waves. It's just not thick enough to handle any kind of heavy work. 1/2" plate can be point loaded with an enormous amount of weight in the center of a 42" square, unsupported area, and not permanently deflect. Can't say the same for 1/4". But I do like a good strong support frame under my table tops. As seen in the drawing on post #12.

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