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Mounting I-beam and chainfall over lathe

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  • Meltedmetal
    replied
    I don't know. I'm in Canada so the standards are not likely the same. IIRC we were instructed to make the alteration by the CSST inspector(equivalent to your workman's compensation inspectors, maybe) It was a new installation for us from a foundry that closed so it had to meet the current specs. They never came back to check but it's not a terrible idea and reasonably cheap to do.
    https://www.crane1.com/about-us/blog...-requirements/
    Perhaps someone in your organization thought it might save some expensive parts from hitting the floor.

    ---Meltedmetal

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  • Don52
    replied
    Originally posted by Meltedmetal View Post
    Yeah, we were advised by the powers that be that our antique carriages could not fall more than 1 inch should an axle fail, so we had to retrofit them to comply. Probably a good idea as we were moving 400 lbs.pots of molten iron with them. We never needed the safety device but it is nice to know they were there.

    ---Meltedmetal
    I just walked through our training area. One chainfall trolley had a factory trolley with a drop stop mounted on it as shown below.

    16. Factory mounted drop stop
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    Two had angle iron drop stops welded to the carriage.

    17. shop repaired drop stop
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    And one trolley didn't have a drop stop at all.

    18. Trolley without a drop stop
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    Here is what I could find.
    19. Safety Lug definition
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    I had trouble finding a standard that required this for trolleys.
    Do you know which standard applies?
    Our application is just lifting parts of robots.
    No hot metal is involved.

    -Don

    Leave a comment:


  • Meltedmetal
    replied
    Yeah, we were advised by the powers that be that our antique carriages could not fall more than 1 inch should an axle fail, so we had to retrofit them to comply. Probably a good idea as we were moving 400 lbs.pots of molten iron with them. We never needed the safety device but it is nice to know they were there.

    ---Meltedmetal

    Leave a comment:


  • Don52
    replied
    Originally posted by Meltedmetal View Post

    While they do protect the wheels from the stops those turned in ends are there to catch the carriage with a minimum of drop should there be an axle failure on the carriage.

    ---Meltedmetal
    That makes sense. You learn something every day.

    -Don

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I think you made the best dadgum trolley stop ever, Don.

    On my overhead, I figured the bolt heads in the knee braces at the ends would keep the trolley in check, I was wrong. Stupid thing jumps right over top of that sapsucker. Then I have to get on a ladder and climb up there and back it over top of that bolt head. I think a simple c-clamp would suffice under the tremendous load. But, I may take one of those bolts out, flip her over and thread a coupler on it for the nut. Should be plenty. It's not holding back the 10th Mongolian horde.

    Leave a comment:


  • Meltedmetal
    replied
    Originally posted by Franz© View Post
    Don you got a beamrider there and it looks like enough wheels got busted on conventional beam trollys for somebody to reengineer for bumpers and less lost headroom.
    While they do protect the wheels from the stops those turned in ends are there to catch the carriage with a minimum of drop should there be an axle failure on the carriage.

    ---Meltedmetal

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    Don you got a beamrider there and it looks like enough wheels got busted on conventional beam trollys for somebody to reengineer for bumpers and less lost headroom.

    Of course you take that same device into a beer foundry and within hours somebody will find a way to club it into submission to their will.

    One of my collectibles is a WW-2 vintage tool/part lifter that was designed for speed rather than safety. The design allowed the object to be lifted onto a bench & lowered by the user just slacking grip on the hand chain. Rating is only 500# but it's the hoist everybody grabs because it's small and light. Nobody listens and there is a lot of yelling when it don't hold what's hanging.

    Looks like you got a chance with Phil, hopefully he's one who wants to learn and he'll be worth something. Any more I'm wondering what language most of the kids think they're speaking. I got no reference to Ratatatt & sharp thing.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    This guy has two SB 10", an atlas 10" and an old Logan he wants to pass on somewhere too. I think he'll keep the Logan because it seems he's emotionally attached to it. It has a sweet 6 jaw chuck on it too. He also has a brown and sharps horizontal mill and two or three Bridgeports he's not using any more. He wants some room for a shear and a brake. I told him we just need to put a gantry crane in his shop.

    Leave a comment:


  • Don52
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    Nice machine Don. I have a chance to get my hands on a 19" summit lathe. Might be a big too big for my shop. It would be a shame to let this deal go though.
    I had the same concern when I picked up the 15" lathe. To solve the problem I picked up a Jacob Rubber Flex chuck and collet set for it. I can easilly hold parts that are a little under 1/16" diameter with it. I also purchased an ER collet chuck and collet set for it, but I haven't machined a D1-6 backing plate for it yet. I figured that I could pick up a small lathe if I really required it, but so far it isn't necessary.

    -Don

    Leave a comment:


  • Don52
    replied
    Originally posted by Franz© View Post
    Sorry Don, you made some fine looking blocks there, and hood work teaching the young Buck how the world really works, but based on the teachings of Buster Randt Professor of Millwright Emaritus and probably resting in peach now, them *&%$%*& blocks gotta be Maple. [email protected]$^&(*$ metal blocks crack the ())_&% wheel and you wind up bustin yer A$$ at the worst possible time working around a problem you could have prevented. Oak soaks up moisture and spalls off and next thing yer wearing the *())^ hoist for a hat. Buster was Unforgiving, unyielding and usually right. I recall his teachings often.

    He and I built some very successful tools on company time, and cleaned out everything worth hauling out of the old shop.

    While you got the kid handy you might educate him up on cleaning the chip pan out without cutting fingers as well. He'll be the smartest kid in his class when he goes back.
    Franz,
    When Phil put all of the extra spacers on the outside of two shafts, the hole for the cotter pin in one shaft missed the slots in the castle nut because the rod was a little too long, so the cotter pin wouldn't actually retain the castle nut. The washers were non-standard because the ID was very close to the OD, so I quickly made one on my lathe. The home made washer looked like it belonged. Phil was amazed how quickly I made the parts with the quick change tooling for the lathe. I told him that once you are familiar with a new tool such as a lathe, you can think in terms of using it. It would be equivalent to how automatic it is for Phil to use a drill motor and drill bit. You pick it up and use it, without thinking about the process too much. I was glad that I was able to demonstrate both the lathe and the mill to Phil on this project.

    In this case the block hits the carriage of the chainfall not the wheel, so I'm not sure how the wheel would be damaged when the carriage hit the stop block. The linear motion of the carriage is controlled by the chain, which is very geared down, so it moves very slowly (about 2 inches/sec). I can't imagine any damage resulting from the carriage softly bumping the steel stop block. I design industrial robots and rail systems for a living and we typically will put rubber bumpers or hydraulic shock absorbers on the stop blocks on the end of the rail to limit the force transmitted to the stop block. The bumpers are designed to limit the force of a full speed collision to a value that the hardware can accommodate. Below is a side view of the stop block that you can better see the relationship between the bracket on the end of the carriage and the stop block.

    15. Carriage hitting stop block
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    Thank you for all of your comments. It makes the thread more interesting.

    -Don

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Nice machine Don. I have a chance to get my hands on a 19" summit lathe. Might be a big too big for my shop. It would be a shame to let this deal go though.

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    Sorry Don, you made some fine looking blocks there, and hood work teaching the young Buck how the world really works, but based on the teachings of Buster Randt Professor of Millwright Emaritus and probably resting in peach now, them *&%$%*& blocks gotta be Maple. [email protected]$^&(*$ metal blocks crack the ())_&% wheel and you wind up bustin yer A$$ at the worst possible time working around a problem you could have prevented. Oak soaks up moisture and spalls off and next thing yer wearing the *())^ hoist for a hat. Buster was Unforgiving, unyielding and usually right. I recall his teachings often.

    He and I built some very successful tools on company time, and cleaned out everything worth hauling out of the old shop.

    While you got the kid handy you might educate him up on cleaning the chip pan out without cutting fingers as well. He'll be the smartest kid in his class when he goes back.

    Leave a comment:


  • Don52
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    Nice work Don....and Tarry.

    What lathe are you moving under that I-beam?

    A friend of mine down the road has a monster LaBlonde lathe he wants me to help him build a swing arm for this very set up. His lathe is up against a wall and his shop is a tall steel frame building. We'll see what we come up with.
    I plan on moving my 15" Clausing Colchester Lathe. Currently it is in the unheated 2 car garage. I will move it to the new addition, which is already heated and air conditioned. Being the worlds slowest contractor I am just passing two years since I broke ground on the addition. I am however making slow progress. For example yesterday Phil and I installed 23 of the LED lights in the ceiling of the addition.

    14. Clausing Colchester 15 inch Lathe
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  • Don52
    replied
    Originally posted by Franz© View Post
    Sweet, especially the free labor from the young buck.

    Might I humbly suggest some maple blocks on both sides of the beam web bolted thru the web to serve as ABSOLUTE stops for the trolley. Those things hurt a lot when they come off track even if you're wearing a hard hat. Also take chunks out of concrete.
    Originally I had a nut and bolt on each end of the I-beam to keep it from running off the end of the track. Based on your input I decided to do a higher quality job using a block instead. It also gave me an opportunity to demonstrate machining on the milling machine for my nephew Phil, who is just starting his Junior year in Mechanical Engineering.

    10. Machining the block on the Mill
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    11. One of the machined block
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    12. Phil installing the block
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    13. The block installed
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    -Don


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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Nice work Don....and Tarry.

    What lathe are you moving under that I-beam?

    A friend of mine down the road has a monster LaBlonde lathe he wants me to help him build a swing arm for this very set up. His lathe is up against a wall and his shop is a tall steel frame building. We'll see what we come up with.

    Leave a comment:

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