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Mounting I-beam and chainfall over lathe

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Meltedmetal View Post

    While they do protect the wheels from the stops those turned in ends are there to catch the carriage with a minimum of drop should there be an axle failure on the carriage.

    ---Meltedmetal
    That makes sense. You learn something every day.

    -Don
    Miller Thunderbolt
    Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
    Miller Dynasty 200DX
    Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
    Lincoln LE 31 MP
    Lincoln 210 MP
    Clausing/Colchester 15" Lathe
    16" DuAll Saw
    15" Drill Press
    7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
    20 Ton Arbor Press
    Bridgeport

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    • #17
      Yeah, we were advised by the powers that be that our antique carriages could not fall more than 1 inch should an axle fail, so we had to retrofit them to comply. Probably a good idea as we were moving 400 lbs.pots of molten iron with them. We never needed the safety device but it is nice to know they were there.

      ---Meltedmetal
      ---Meltedmetal

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Meltedmetal View Post
        Yeah, we were advised by the powers that be that our antique carriages could not fall more than 1 inch should an axle fail, so we had to retrofit them to comply. Probably a good idea as we were moving 400 lbs.pots of molten iron with them. We never needed the safety device but it is nice to know they were there.

        ---Meltedmetal
        I just walked through our training area. One chainfall trolley had a factory trolley with a drop stop mounted on it as shown below.

        16. Factory mounted drop stop
        Click image for larger version  Name:	16. Factory mounted drop stop.jpg Views:	0 Size:	38.8 KB ID:	598861
        Two had angle iron drop stops welded to the carriage.

        17. shop repaired drop stop
        Click image for larger version  Name:	17. shop repaired drop stop.jpg Views:	0 Size:	58.3 KB ID:	598862

        And one trolley didn't have a drop stop at all.

        18. Trolley without a drop stop
        Click image for larger version  Name:	18. Trolley without a drop stop.jpg Views:	0 Size:	62.1 KB ID:	598863
        Here is what I could find.
        19. Safety Lug definition
        Click image for larger version  Name:	19. Safety Lug definition.jpg Views:	0 Size:	100.0 KB ID:	598864

        I had trouble finding a standard that required this for trolleys.
        Do you know which standard applies?
        Our application is just lifting parts of robots.
        No hot metal is involved.

        -Don
        Miller Thunderbolt
        Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
        Miller Dynasty 200DX
        Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
        Lincoln LE 31 MP
        Lincoln 210 MP
        Clausing/Colchester 15" Lathe
        16" DuAll Saw
        15" Drill Press
        7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
        20 Ton Arbor Press
        Bridgeport

        Comment


        • #19
          I don't know. I'm in Canada so the standards are not likely the same. IIRC we were instructed to make the alteration by the CSST inspector(equivalent to your workman's compensation inspectors, maybe) It was a new installation for us from a foundry that closed so it had to meet the current specs. They never came back to check but it's not a terrible idea and reasonably cheap to do.
          https://www.crane1.com/about-us/blog...-requirements/
          Perhaps someone in your organization thought it might save some expensive parts from hitting the floor.

          ---Meltedmetal
          ---Meltedmetal

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