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south bend 13" and reaming tapered holes

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  • #16
    Already tried that.

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    • #17
      I wouldn't trust that U tube fellow too much. He's no weldor with that hat on his head. Bench is too clean too.

      Motor is still available in single phase L1413 Baldor Pre- 1952 NEMA Motor, 203 Frame, Foot Mounted (1 HP, 1800 RPM)

      Mortgage on your house may be necessary.

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      • #18
        I found it on a google search, but I don't think it's a standard stock any longer. Grainger and McMaster-Carr don't list it as a current available frame.

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        • #19
          Ryan, start thinking like a welder. Even if you drilled it out large you can fill it with something and weld it back to new. Start fresh. Like it was mentioned, drill to the shaft, slip it off and move things along already. This is becoming painful and I'm starting to become a little disappointed in waiting for the big finish. It should be you posting this was the sob and this is how I fixed the sob. That's what we've come to expect from you anyways. You got bars, round ones maybe to fill a hole? We are on the edge of our seats waiting for what did the man do to solve that problem?

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          • #20
            Attitude is standing by.

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            • #21
              I'm certain I'll get it off. Probably end up drilling it out, pulling it off and putting the next size up taper pin in there. I was hoping for some magical solution from someone that's nailed this problem before. Bob thinks its a #1 taper pin, so I'll look into that. One step at a time now. Get it off, measure the new hole, then solve the remounting problem. You guys just haven't come through on the solution for a 1945 south bend lathe under motor drive pulley taper pin seized up issue. Dadgumit.

              This is just the first of hopefully only one problem like this I encounter on this rebuild. But knowing my luck, it won't be. Maybe my troubles will help someone down the road at least. It'll help me, that's for sure. Learn something new every day.

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              • #22
                You're sure your driving from the small end of the pin? Build a solid heavy support for the pulley hub with relief for the pin to exit into. Verify again the correct direction.Use a punch and a big hammer.

                ---Meltedmetal
                ---Meltedmetal

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                • #23
                  I'm 95% sure. This has been worked on before, so polishing and etching the metal revealed the edges of the pin. The difference in diameter between the two ends is correct for a taper of 1/4" x 12, which is what the rest of the taper pins have been.

                  Not surprising...in the rebuild book I picked up when I bought a few odds-n-ends, it actually has a section about the trouble you should expect to encounter with these taper pins.

                  Hopefully I can get to it later today and return to the forum later this evening as the victor.

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                  • #24
                    Chicken dinner for me.
                    Attached Files

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                    • #25
                      Remaining bits of the offending taper pin....you little mother..............
                      Attached Files

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                      • #26
                        And the crowd cheers loudly. Ryan, Ryan, Ryan. That's how you earn bars fellas.

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                        • #27
                          Ryan can you run a vernier on the pinus cadaverous?

                          Might be my ancient eyes, but that doesn't look like a full length taper to me. Looks more akin to a straight pin somebody ground a taper on to ease alignment and insertion.
                          Of course if you already dropped the contemptable little buszard on the floor and stomped it that's OK too.

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                          • #28
                            It is most certainly a tapered hole this abomination of a pin was in.

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                            • #29
                              I finally got the drive assembly apart yesterday evening. I fenangled the cone pulley off the shaft after a fair amount of persuasion then drove the shaft out of the drive pulley, shearing what was left of the pin off. Worked like a champ. I think that was only plan M or N....

                              But this picture is my next repair to make. I'm going to try and turn down the mushroomed part and chase the old threads out. I figure about a 26.825% chance of success in that. Back up plan is to turn it down, build it back up with some tig wire, turn it back down again and cut a whole new thread. If I do that, I'll add to the end and bring it back to the original overall length too. Just have to find that information. So if anyone happens to have an old 13" SBL and is so inclined to do so, I'd love to know what the correct length of that shaft is supposed to be.

                              Fortunately I have an old, experienced machinist friend that has one bad mammerjammer of a LeBlonde that scoffs at such small work.

                              One piece at a time here.
                              Attached Files

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                              • #30
                                Pretty tough to add weld and then think about re-threading it without going through a heat-treat process........with the basic HSS dies........which will Die! on anything hard...............run a small jewelers file along that shaft and it will tell you how hard it is.......cut it down with an appropriate tool , chase it and call it a day.

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