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upcoming cast iron light pole repair

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  • #16
    I don't think any of my abrasives are ceramic. I'll have to look. I've recently been learning some important aspects about the differences. Before, a flap disc was a flap disc. Not true.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
      I don't think any of my abrasives are ceramic. I'll have to look. I've recently been learning some important aspects about the differences. Before, a flap disc was a flap disc. Not true.
      Me too, you may already know this, but I thought this was a good short intro to the topic
      Richard

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      • #18
        Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
        Anyone see any compatibility issues there?
        Think of it this way... you have two pieces and need to make them one piece. It's going to be painted so you don't need to worry about color match. It's not going to be exposed to high heat so that means softening isn't an issue. It's not under load so you don't need to worry about tensile strength. It's not going to be bent or formed so rule out ductility. Not exposed to corrosive elements what your left with is simply what can you use that will join them together with success?

        The alloying of Aluminum or Silicon in creating the bronze, while enhancing mechanical or chemical properties will still do things in a similar fashion as far as melting, and bonding. Both act as deoxidizing cleaning agents, will alter flow characteristics slightly in alloying, and if chosen for repairs yield a similar result as far as welding is concerned. Mechanical properties and chemistry aside, they will flow and bond together. The preparation of the surface, controlling melting range, that's the key.

        https://www.copper.org/applications/...-engineers.pdf

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6ccw7X8zeI

        I have nothing but confidence you'll be successful. Could be, the guy who welded them before had to use what he had available, he got what he got? You have other options.

        Think of it this way, is it the knife that cuts the tomato that makes for a nice slice or the sharpness of the blade? When in doubt, try and find out.

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        • #19
          So not as bad as I thought. The pole was made in pieces for assembly in the field. It's basically a socket with set screws as apparent in the pictures. So probably going to be a lot of build up so I can drill and tap new set screw holes.

          As understand it, the Boykin Machinery & Supply company in Beaumont Texas made heavy industrial parts for the oil field. And the Lucas Gusher was literally down the road from me. As far as I can tell, without going to the local historical library, their hay-days were in the 20s. According to some of the old guys here with the city, when management decided to tear down these old poles, they just sent them to the scrap yard. As far as I can tell, there are three of these left...the two in this pair and one in The Fire Museum of Texas. This one may be an earlier model, as the cast pieces are basically smooth. The other two have some pretty intricate scroll work on the casting bases. I better not screw this one up.

          The light control box was a later addition to this pole. An upgrade made to the gamewell alarm boxes was this switch. Inside that box is a mechanical device that made the light on the top of the pole flash, making it easier for firemen to find the activated alarm.

          Cool piece of local history.
          Attached Files

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          • #20
            Great pictures and back story, the last welder looks like he struggled...
            Richard

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            • #21
              On initial impression, it's nickel rod, and there is some cracking on either side of that chunk that's been "welded" back into place. I'll probably stick drill those cracks so I don't perpetuate those. The old repair on this also attempted to weld the two seconds together, which this is a picture of. You can see that the filler metal just laid on top of the casting. Some serious cold lap with a stick rod.
              Attached Files

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              • #22
                Looks straightforward and fun. The kind of repair that makes you look like a hero and makes it all worth it
                Good luck!!

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                • #23
                  Here's my plan...cut that welded in chunk out, grind off all the old booger weld, find the end of that crack...I worry I'll make it worse if I don't...and stop drill it, clean it all up with a grinder and a burr and tig braze that chunk back in, then build up those gaps and dress it down. Drill out the remaining set screw, drill and tap new set screw holes, install new set screws. Sounds easy enough.
                  Attached Files

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                  • #24
                    Almost ready to make it one piece again. A little more burr work and a fresh bottle of argon and we'll be ready.
                    Attached Files

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                    • #25
                      Lookin good!
                      Richard

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                      • #26
                        I just want to make sure I get all that old weld out of there. It's fairly easy to tell when you're running a grinder on it once you get out of that nickel rod and back into the cast.

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                        • #27
                          Nice!

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                          • #28
                            Click image for larger version

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                            Last edited by Bls repair; 03-20-2019, 04:39 AM.

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                            • #29
                              Aluminum bronze stick

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                              • #30
                                I think you tried to post some pictures? All I can see from here is four white boxes with a blue border.

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