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Hardfacing AR400 Skids Electrode help

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  • FusionKing
    replied
    Originally posted by Noel View Post
    I'm going to jump in on this...maybe late for inclusion but I have my doubts it has relevance in todays world of approval so I didn't post it sooner.
    But I had to suggest it.
    If I said to you, son...take those E7018, knock the flux off of them, switch the machine over to straight polarity and weld your hatch pattern, dots or design, would you try it as a solution?
    Probably not.
    But I was instructed to do it. And it works. You can run nice beads and get a hard deposit. Cheaply.
    Call it poor mans hard surfacing? How hard? Good question, but don't use a good file on it to find out.
    So...if you can carry a steady arc you can strip droplets off an electrode. No slag means the weld cools quick and hard...the dirt that fills the spaces does the protecting really so depending on the requirements...It could well be hard enough.
    It's a solution to a problem for someone maybe? Anyways...you could use any carbon steel electrode really, but the 7018 lime base residual left behind, it's ease of flux removal from the conductor, and that it seems to help with arc stabilization for those less steady when holding an arc, makes it a good choice over cellulose, rutile or iron power coated electrodes. Play with the heat and arc length to allow for the globular droplet to part ways without shorting out/ sticking and good too go.
    As always...take it for what's it's worth.

    Years ago I worked at a shop where they had us do that only with 308. I did it for days on end in the freezing cold one year. Had to coil the leads up and stand on them to keep my feet warm. At the time I thought that WAS hardfacing and didn't know they were being cheapskates.

    Leave a comment:


  • ih784
    replied
    Noel. Awesome idea. I'll check this out and see if I can find anyone who has done it using a similar application to mine. Thank you!

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    That is an interesting solution. I never would've thought of it. For me, I don't have time to fiddle with something like that, I need to turn and burn. I do like creative solutions and will add this to my tool box.

    Leave a comment:


  • Noel
    replied
    I'm going to jump in on this...maybe late for inclusion but I have my doubts it has relevance in todays world of approval so I didn't post it sooner.
    But I had to suggest it.
    If I said to you, son...take those E7018, knock the flux off of them, switch the machine over to straight polarity and weld your hatch pattern, dots or design, would you try it as a solution?
    Probably not.
    But I was instructed to do it. And it works. You can run nice beads and get a hard deposit. Cheaply.
    Call it poor mans hard surfacing? How hard? Good question, but don't use a good file on it to find out.
    So...if you can carry a steady arc you can strip droplets off an electrode. No slag means the weld cools quick and hard...the dirt that fills the spaces does the protecting really so depending on the requirements...It could well be hard enough.
    It's a solution to a problem for someone maybe? Anyways...you could use any carbon steel electrode really, but the 7018 lime base residual left behind, it's ease of flux removal from the conductor, and that it seems to help with arc stabilization for those less steady when holding an arc, makes it a good choice over cellulose, rutile or iron power coated electrodes. Play with the heat and arc length to allow for the globular droplet to part ways without shorting out/ sticking and good too go.
    As always...take it for what's it's worth.


    Leave a comment:


  • MAC702
    replied
    Look at the duty cycle, also. Hardfacing can often be a high duty cycle application.

    Leave a comment:


  • ih784
    replied
    I've only got about 6" on either side I need to do where the unit was digging in because of it being angled down. If I can build it up with something harder I think the skids (as a whole) will wear more evenly. I looked up the specs on that Rod as per the advice... It would be close to what I can do with that machine.

    Leave a comment:


  • theweldor
    replied
    Why not just stitch on a piece of AR400 1/4 0r 3/8 thick to the bottom.

    Leave a comment:


  • MMW
    replied
    Look up the specific rod on the internet and you should be able to find the parameters for it. I would start on the McKay site.

    Leave a comment:


  • ih784
    replied
    Thank y'all for helping me out. I'm a novice at best when it comes to welding. The skids I'm welding are 1/2" thick by 3" wide. I've got a maxstar 200 that came from a shipyard welding repair shop. I specified 1/8 but I've found a pretty good deal on some 3/16 hardfacing rod (McKay). Do you think this machine can push it? Again I appreciate all the help!

    Leave a comment:


  • MMW
    replied
    https://www.mcmaster.com/#welding-rods/=1d0bolt

    Here you go. Just down a few lines you will see "wear resistant stick electrodes" click on that.
    Last edited by MMW; 05-26-2018, 06:46 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • MAC702
    replied
    Of course adding beads of 7018 will add steel and therefore protection. The deal with hardfacing rod is that it is far better and longer lasting. Only you can answer the question of YOUR level of abrasion, and YOUR time to redo the job when needed.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Hardfacing rod isn't cheap, did you try eBay?

    Or maybe find an outfit nearby that does a lot of hardfacing and see if they'll sell you a couple of pounds.

    Try one of the maintenance rod companies, like Rockmount, and maybe they'll sell you just a couple of pounds.

    I think I have some stuff laying around, but I'm fairly certain it's bigger than 1/8.

    Leave a comment:


  • ih784
    started a topic Hardfacing AR400 Skids Electrode help

    Hardfacing AR400 Skids Electrode help

    Good evening guys,

    I have a couple of skids I need to weld some hardfacing onto. Because of my machine I'm limited to 1/8. I only need a pound or two of electrodes and don't want to pay for a full 10 pounds that I'll never use in my lifetime. Do you think I could get by using 7018 or could anyone recommend a good source to buy a small amount of metal to earth or similar electrode?

    Thank you you in advance!

    V/r, John
    Starts
    05-24-2018
    Ends
    05-25-2018
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