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Brake drums from big trucks

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  • Ironken
    replied
    He would probably appreciate them and get the wrong idea.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I could totally use those scented candles; I'm running out of stuff to throw at my man-cardless neighbor.

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  • Ironken
    replied
    Originally posted by old jupiter View Post
    Oh man, Ken you just gave me the idea for a good show-off project (dang, I'd finally be forced to learn how to post photos). Several guys have shown their work tables with those "trailer hitch" receivers that take a variety of benders and vises, as needed. So here's a new way to compete for the "coolest shop" honors: How about a big storage rack, made of steel, set against a wall, that has rows of the 2" receivers, each occupied by a particular bender or vise or anvil or bead-roller, the more the better. Not that anybody is actually "competing;" we just all love a functional, efficient shop full of tools,

    As to the brake drum stand, one advantage to that is that you can move the tool around with a hand-truck, as needed. Next to my indoor shop is one of those great big sheetmetal carports with a fine gravel floor, so big I call it "the Zeppelin Hanger," and some of my tools stay out there, under cover but somewhat exposed to the elements (so I keep the tools and work table oiled-up). If I keep the Beverly shear out there, being able to move it around with the hand-truck seems like a good idea.
    I'm in Jupiter! May be awhile before I get to the receiver rack but, I would like to see what other guys have done to their shops. Maybe I'll (or whoever) start a shop pic thread after I get some pics. Kinda tough to compete with a zeppelin hanger though. You are a lucky man!

    Ryan, you don't have room for any feng shui? Dammit! I just shipped you some scented candles. Just hackin' on ya, brother.

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  • old jupiter
    replied
    Originally posted by Meltedmetal
    There is no rule, except maybe in Feng Shui, that you need to mount your tool in the center of the drum. You could offset it closer to one side. Yes it will tip easier in that direction but . . . l
    Thought about that, but with a Beverly shear you pull toward you and down. Usually the forces aren't very high, so the offset might work anyway.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I aint got no room for no fungus show in my shop, by god. Just gotta to make room for the next biggest hammer I need.

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  • Meltedmetal
    replied
    Originally posted by old jupiter View Post
    My own negative thought about using a truck brake drum as a base for a tool is that it's big enough that you might not be able to stand as close to the tools as you might want.
    Just a suggestion. There is no rule, except maybe in Feng Shui, that you need to mount your tool in the center of the drum. You could offset it closer to one side. Yes it will tip easier in that direction but things like a grinder would have the long side of the foot behind them in the direction you would push anyway.---Meltedmetal

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  • old jupiter
    replied
    Oh man, Ken you just gave me the idea for a good show-off project (dang, I'd finally be forced to learn how to post photos). Several guys have shown their work tables with those "trailer hitch" receivers that take a variety of benders and vises, as needed. So here's a new way to compete for the "coolest shop" honors: How about a big storage rack, made of steel, set against a wall, that has rows of the 2" receivers, each occupied by a particular bender or vise or anvil or bead-roller, the more the better. Not that anybody is actually "competing;" we just all love a functional, efficient shop full of tools,

    As to the brake drum stand, one advantage to that is that you can move the tool around with a hand-truck, as needed. Next to my indoor shop is one of those great big sheetmetal carports with a fine gravel floor, so big I call it "the Zeppelin Hanger," and some of my tools stay out there, under cover but somewhat exposed to the elements (so I keep the tools and work table oiled-up). If I keep the Beverly shear out there, being able to move it around with the hand-truck seems like a good idea.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ironken
    replied
    I cannot see the pics either. I like the idea of a small table for stationary shop tools, just no room for that. My "healing table" is kinda modest at 5'x3' not leaving much room for permanantly attached tools. I plan on welding a 2" receiver to my table and attaching the vise, etc to 2" HW sq tubing to keep the table top clear.

    Leave a comment:


  • old jupiter
    replied
    Sberry, I take your point about having places to lay tools next to my Beverly shear, unoccupied horizontal surfaces being scarce in most shops, but I figure to have some of these welded to the sides of the support column. My own negative thought about using a truck brake drum as a base for a tool is that it's big enough that you might not be able to stand as close to the tools as you might want. Well, if it doesn't work for one thing, it might for another. Maybe I'm just trying to find some use for those otherwise useless brake drums.
    My laptop isn't letting me see your photos, which show up only as little square black boxes with an X in them.

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  • Sberry
    replied
    OK, learning. I have been in a lot of shops. Many with more but usually not better. I like a clear table, with no interference it doesn't have to be big. The geometry is fairly precice here. The vise is at the near end of a utility bench where I cluster those kind of attachments. The walk around, the walk to is super fluid. I use "the bench" for more than welding but al kinds of general fab and that white thingy on the front of one is a cut bucket for plasma.
    Last edited by Sberry; 01-13-2016, 11:12 AM.

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  • Sberry
    replied
    Here is m take and it doesn't have mush to do with metal but shop design. As a base for a shear it may not be so bad but would just as soon or better to have a small table to bolt several items to and have a set spot for hand tools and parts while using it. A vise is the same, a post stuck in the floor in the middle of no where is far better as an idea than in practical use.
    The upside is its cheap and eventually could scrap the base.
    Last edited by Sberry; 01-13-2016, 10:59 AM.

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  • Tinker Joe 2
    replied
    Old Jupiter, I have used them on several stand over the years, they work great, they are cast Iron, I cut and fit a piece of steel in the center welded it in several spots let it cool a little and it welded up nice, go for it, Joe

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  • fabricator
    replied
    I haven't seen one yet that wasn't cast iron. Also another way to tell is with a cutting torch, as it will not cut cast iron.

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  • old jupiter
    started a topic Brake drums from big trucks

    Brake drums from big trucks

    Great big heavy run-out brake drums off of big dump-trucks and the like look like pretty good bases for some sorts of project. But are they cast iron, or cast steel? (I'm guessing iron).
    (Maybe this week I can get one over here and hit it with a grinder and watch the sparks. But I was looking at some of your projects and thinking about this just now, so . . . .)
    In any case, I'll mount a short column of steel square tube to the brake drum, a plate atop the column, and bolt a Beverly shear to that.
    Last edited by old jupiter; 01-11-2016, 12:25 AM.
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