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Shelf on Front of Landscape Trailer for Vacuum

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  • Shelf on Front of Landscape Trailer for Vacuum

    My customer purchased a vacuum to be mounted to the a shelf on the front of his landscape trailer. The purpose of the shelf was to maximize storage on the trailer by allowing the tractor to fit under it. It comes with a 60 foot inlet hose so my customer can blow the leaves into a big pile and then vacuum them up and blow them into the dump body of the truck when the truck is parked on the street or in the driveway. The inlet hose would mount to the right side of the vacuum shown in the first picture. The blades of the fan in the vacuum are serrated so that it will also shred the leaves, so that they can be more densely packed. When leaves aren't falling he can use the vacuum to suck the grass clippings out of the bags on the back of his X-Mark zero turn tractor and blow them into the dump body.

    My task was to design and fabricate the shelf. My customer wanted the top made of expanded metal so that it wouldn't hold rain, because the trailer stays outdoors. He wanted to also carry a waterproof toolbox and some five gallon gas cans on the shelf. The top of the trailer was neither square or level and the front was bowed out in the middle and was also higher in the middle so I welded together the shelf with only three legs and shortened the cross brace of the shelf to fit and tack welded the fourth leg at assembly so that the feet of the shelf would align with the frame of the trailer. I also added the two legs in the middle of the front at assembly for the same reason. When I took the last picture the side boards hadn't been replaced yet.

    Don
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Don52; 10-27-2015, 07:11 PM.
    Miller Thunderbolt
    Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
    Miller Dynasty 200DX
    Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
    Lincoln LE 31 MP
    Lincoln 210 MP
    Clausing/Colchester 15" Lathe
    16" DuAll Saw
    15" Drill Press
    7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
    20 Ton Arbor Press
    Bridgeport

  • #2
    Here are the rest of the pictures:
    Attached Files
    Miller Thunderbolt
    Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
    Miller Dynasty 200DX
    Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
    Lincoln LE 31 MP
    Lincoln 210 MP
    Clausing/Colchester 15" Lathe
    16" DuAll Saw
    15" Drill Press
    7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
    20 Ton Arbor Press
    Bridgeport

    Comment


    • #3
      Is that 9ga expanded metal? Seems like you do a fair amount of fab work for landscapers. Carved a little niche market for yourself?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
        Is that 9ga expanded metal? Seems like you do a fair amount of fab work for landscapers. Carved a little niche market for yourself?
        Yes, it seems that landscaping tends to be hard on equipment which generates a lot work that requires welding. I actually bought the expanded metal to match the rear ramp of this trailer, but I wound up staightening the existing expanded instead. McMaster Carr had a great selection with enough dimensions so that I could match it perfectly. I used the one that was 0.282" thick on the attached chart.
        Attached Files
        Last edited by Don52; 10-28-2015, 09:08 PM.
        Miller Thunderbolt
        Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
        Miller Dynasty 200DX
        Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
        Lincoln LE 31 MP
        Lincoln 210 MP
        Clausing/Colchester 15" Lathe
        16" DuAll Saw
        15" Drill Press
        7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
        20 Ton Arbor Press
        Bridgeport

        Comment


        • #5
          Don, your work is always very nice & professional looking. Once again nice job. Thanks for posting detailed pics of projects you do.
          MM250
          Trailblazer 250g
          22a feeder
          Lincoln ac/dc 225
          Victor O/A
          MM200 black face
          Whitney 30 ton hydraulic punch
          Lown 1/8x 36" power roller
          Arco roto-phase model M
          Vectrax 7x12 band saw
          Miller spectrum 875
          30a spoolgun w/wc-24
          Syncrowave 250
          RCCS-14

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by MMW View Post
            Don, your work is always very nice & professional looking. Once again nice job. Thanks for posting detailed pics of projects you do.
            Thanks, I also enjoy your work especially your repair of construction equipment.

            Don
            Miller Thunderbolt
            Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
            Miller Dynasty 200DX
            Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
            Lincoln LE 31 MP
            Lincoln 210 MP
            Clausing/Colchester 15" Lathe
            16" DuAll Saw
            15" Drill Press
            7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
            20 Ton Arbor Press
            Bridgeport

            Comment


            • #7
              Vacuum Complete

              Picture 11 shows the weed whackers and the stuff on the shelf.
              Picture 12 shows some of the welds that attach the shelf to the trailer.
              Picture 13 shows some of the stuff my customer put on the shelf in addition to holding the vacuum.
              Picture 14 is a right hand view. In it you can see the plate I added to support the side boards.
              Picture 15 shows the vacuum in use.

              Don
              Attached Files
              Miller Thunderbolt
              Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
              Miller Dynasty 200DX
              Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
              Lincoln LE 31 MP
              Lincoln 210 MP
              Clausing/Colchester 15" Lathe
              16" DuAll Saw
              15" Drill Press
              7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
              20 Ton Arbor Press
              Bridgeport

              Comment


              • #8
                That is a nice looking operations that you have going, hope you make good money because that is hard work, sure is a lot of compost for someone there, bet your looking forward to some much needed rest from cutting and the heat, take care, Joe

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Tinker Joe 2 View Post
                  That is a nice looking operations that you have going, hope you make good money because that is hard work, sure is a lot of compost for someone there, bet your looking forward to some much needed rest from cutting and the heat, take care, Joe
                  Thanks, Just to clarify I do welding repair. The attached pictures are of one my customer using his new vacuum to pick up leaves, on the shelf that I fabricated and mounted to his trailer.

                  Don
                  Attached Files
                  Miller Thunderbolt
                  Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
                  Miller Dynasty 200DX
                  Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
                  Lincoln LE 31 MP
                  Lincoln 210 MP
                  Clausing/Colchester 15" Lathe
                  16" DuAll Saw
                  15" Drill Press
                  7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
                  20 Ton Arbor Press
                  Bridgeport

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Now that's what the hot rodder magazines would call some very "sano" (sanitary) work.

                    The hard part of any of this stuff is not so much doing good work as doing good work FAST enough to make money and not bankrupt the poor customer. Do you generally use a chopsaw for all those cuts, or a horiz. bandsaw or what? Being fast (I'm asking because I'm not nearly fast enough, LOL) requires making cuts and joints that don't need a lot of, or any, touching up with the 4 1/2" sidegrinder. I'm also curious about the 45 degree beveled tubes that you weld to make your ninetys. Do you just clamp the edges together and weld over them, or do you clamp them with a slight gap to get penetration more easily?

                    Dare I ask about the billable hours for that project? I'm sure your answer will put ME to shame.

                    --Old Pokey

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by old jupiter View Post

                      Do you generally use a chopsaw for all those cuts, or a horiz. bandsaw or what?
                      I use a swivel mast horizontal band saw for all of the cuts.

                      Being fast (I'm asking because I'm not nearly fast enough, LOL) requires making cuts and joints that don't need a lot of, or any, touching up with the 4 1/2" side grinder.
                      I don't touch up any cuts. The swivel mast cuts them nice and square.

                      Do you just clamp the edges together and weld over them, or do you clamp them with a slight gap to get penetration more easily?
                      I cut a little short to leave a little gap for penetration.

                      Dare I ask about the billable hours for that project?
                      I spent 20 hours on this project, but my customer assisted me by picking up the material, cutting down the wood planking and removing it, cutting the pieces as I welded them together and painting it when it was done. I welded the flat stock and tubing that was pickled and oiled as it was . I ground off mill scale from the gussets before welding them . I also ground the few "V" groove welds that I had.

                      Don
                      Miller Thunderbolt
                      Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
                      Miller Dynasty 200DX
                      Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
                      Lincoln LE 31 MP
                      Lincoln 210 MP
                      Clausing/Colchester 15" Lathe
                      16" DuAll Saw
                      15" Drill Press
                      7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
                      20 Ton Arbor Press
                      Bridgeport

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks for that, Don, and thanks for the great article. I like the way you handle photos and their explanations.

                        Comment

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