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welding aluminum beer cans

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  • tcseacliff
    replied
    beer cans

    I believe the beer cans have special coatings on the iside to prserve the beer, that is probably conmtaminating every weld

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  • brian.cuellar
    replied
    well instead of welding to beer cans together . do what I do. I buy the 40 oz cans

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  • Don52
    replied
    Thanks for the tips.
    Originally posted by turboglenn View Post

    (i find myself moving it from the angle edge of one can right over to the other when starting the puddle or if it looses "shape" and needs re-heated.)
    I am going to try that to allow me to melt each side. I know that the 150 Hz causes a stiffer arc, compared to what others have used, but I have found that I can make a smaller weld bead, with the higher frequency. I like it because it allows me to get the arc to dig down into the center trough.

    Might wanna go to 20-25 amps...25 is sketchy for me...30 leans towards burning holes real fast if the arc wanders to one side and too high. Patience helps a TON too :P
    I set the max amps to 30, but I let up on the pedal once I start welding so I am actually welding at a lower current.

    Thanks again,
    Don

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  • turboglenn
    replied
    Originally posted by Don52 View Post
    First attempt to TIG weld two pop cans together.

    -I also found that it was difficult to melt both sides.
    -The heat always wanted to go to one side.
    -The following were my settings:

    Main Amperage = 30 amps
    Start Amps = 10amps (Default start time and polarity)
    Torch = 0.040 thoriated ground just slightly with a # 4 cup on a WP-17 torch
    Gas = 100% Argon at 12cfph with a gas lens
    Rod = 1/16" 4043

    Balance = 70%
    Frequency = 150Hz

    That ALWAYS happens to me...the trick (for me anyway) is to get a puddle going, then lean that cup back and really push the puddle forward. with the arc and gas.... 4043 by nature "wets" better than 5356 so it should be easier...keep the tungsten close and aim it where there's no heat going(i find myself moving it from the angle edge of one can right over to the other when starting the puddle or if it looses "shape" and needs re-heated.

    Then once the puddle is built and fluid, lean that cup back, keep the heat on the filler (and keep the rod in the whole time..no dipping has done me best) and then just push the puddle while steadily adding filler to cool the material...those are my tips anyway, hope they help..You weld looks good to me though *shrugs*

    Might wanna go to 20-25 amps...25 is sketchy for me...30 leans towards burning holes real fast if the arc wanders to one side and too high. Patience helps a TON too :P

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  • Don52
    replied
    First attempt to TIG weld two pop cans together.

    -I also found that it was difficult to melt both sides.
    -The heat always wanted to go to one side.
    -The following were my settings:

    Main Amperage = 30 amps
    Start Amps = 10amps (Default start time and polarity)
    Torch = 0.040 Tri Mix ground with 1/64" Flat
    Cup = # 4
    Torch = Weldcraft WP-17
    Gas = 100% Argon at 12cfph with a gas lens
    Rod = 1/16" 4043

    Balance = 70%
    Frequency = 150Hz
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Don52; 11-03-2008, 06:39 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Craig in Denver
    replied
    Originally posted by benny365 View Post
    There is actually varnish on the very bottom of the can to help it slide during production, make sure to grind that off. in the dome there is no varnish.
    WHAT!?!?! So how long have YOU been doing that to me?!?! Seriously, how long have the bottoms been varnished? I've toyed with welding cans for awhile, some OK; some real bad.

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  • Bodybagger
    replied
    Man, I'm going to have to be nicer to people.

    It sure is a small world!

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  • turboglenn
    replied
    Originally posted by benny365 View Post
    Hey turboglenn, I made those cans!!!

    That code on the bottom of the first picture means May 6th 2008 A = Day shift #3 Decorator plant 66. I worked that day!!!!!

    One of our customers is pepsi omaha, we ship alot of cans down there.

    I am honored to have made those cans for you to weld.

    there is actually varnish on the very bottom of the can to help it slide during production, make sure to grind that off. in the dome there is no varnish.
    That's pretty cool to know I wonder if the latest ones that i've done were made by you as well? I'll have to post up pics tonight or so. I've got a lot going on with my woman leaving for San Antonio Tx (she's air force) and have been just busy as **** here the last few days. I'll post teh pics where we can see the numbers on them as well

    If you ever get out this way to go to the plant hit me up and you can stop by and burn some rod on my machines or whatever.

    Glenn

    Leave a comment:


  • benny365
    replied
    Hey turboglenn, I made those cans!!!

    That code on the bottom of the first picture means May 6th 2008 A = Day shift #3 Decorator plant 66. I worked that day!!!!!

    One of our customers is pepsi omaha, we ship alot of cans down there.

    I am honored to have made those cans for you to weld.

    there is actually varnish on the very bottom of the can to help it slide during production, make sure to grind that off. in the dome there is no varnish.

    Leave a comment:


  • has2tig
    replied
    i have seen that but he is kinda cheatin and i mean truly welding it together like two flat pieces on a table never the less that is a pretty cool trick

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  • rullocus
    replied
    There's actually a video of a guy welding Al foil together on here. If you look up the instructional videos on the Miller website there is samples of the video and he shows how to do it. I'll try it tomorrow...

    Leave a comment:


  • has2tig
    replied
    I first welded two soda cans together at work when i had nothin to do i did it with a syncrowave 250 with no pulse or anything. I got it my first try it easy now. Has anyone ever heard of anyone actually welding aluminum foil together.

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  • Blackbird455
    replied
    Nice TG!!!

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  • Craig in Denver
    replied
    Originally posted by turboglenn View Post
    EDIT: I didn't take any pics, but today i used a # 3 oxy welding tip and some "alumiweld" brazing stick that i got at harbor freight Saturday and my god was that not only easy as could be, but the appearance was great too (save for the burning of the paint and discoloration of the can where the labeling is from radiant heat)
    We know you have a camera, so....... no pics; no braggin'.

    OBTW: Nice job on the Hooraaah!!! And thanks for the detailed settings, even though I can't use 'em on a Syncrowave.

    Leave a comment:


  • turboglenn
    replied
    Hooraaah!!! I did my first can with no holes what so ever!!! The only prep i did was take a piece of "fine" scotch brite pad (the stuff used in auto body shops) and scuffed the bottom of both cans, no wire brush, no acetone or anything else

    The settings were as follows
    Main Amperage = 20 amps
    Start Amps = 10amps (Default start time and polarity)
    Torch = 0.040 thoriated ground just slightly with a # 4 cup on a WP-9 torch
    Gas = 100% Argon at 11cfph

    Pulse Settings
    P.P.S. = 5
    Peak = 80%
    Background = 40%

    Balance = 70%
    Frequency = 67Hz - pretty low for an inverter machine IMO

    I think i could have dialed in 5-10 more amps in the main control to smooth out the "blobbed spot" that formed after I accidentally dipped and contaminated the tungsten But, instead of stopping to fix the tungsten i just kept on welding, said to myself "just said what the heck, I've burned holes in all of them so far anyway".. LOL

    Here's some pics as proof... some are a bit blurry, i suck at macro pictures HAHA (there's also a pic of some little objects that came from boredome... I cut the letter G from 1/4 inch steel with a oxy torch... not bad for me IMO )

    EDIT: I didn't take any pics, but today i used a # 3 oxy welding tip and some "alumiweld" brazing stick that i got at harbor freight Saturday and my god was that not only easy as could be, but the appearance was great too (save for the burning of the paint and discoloration of the can where the labeling is from radiant heat)
    Attached Files
    Last edited by turboglenn; 10-06-2008, 09:43 PM.

    Leave a comment:

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