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Removing a broken screw by welding on a nut

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  • Removing a broken screw by welding on a nut

    I am doing a bunch of work on my customers utility trailer, which includes replacing the jack on the tongue of the trailer.

    Picture 1 is a picture of the whole trailer.

    We broke off one screw while attempting to remove one of the screws that attached the jack.
    Picture 2 shows the broken screw.

    I TIG welded an extension to the screw and then welded a nut to the extension. When the screw was welded it expanded. When it cooled it shrunk and opened up some clearance on the threads so that we could remove it with a socket.

    Picture 3 shows the nut welded to the extension of the screw in place.
    Picture 4 shows the nut welded to the extension of the screw once it was removed.
    Picture 5 shows the jack mounted to the tongue of the trailer.
    Attached Files
    Miller Thunderbolt
    Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
    Miller Dynasty 200DX
    Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
    Lincoln LE 31 MP
    Lincoln 210 MP
    Clausing/Colchester 15" Lathe
    16" DuAll Saw
    15" Drill Press
    7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
    20 Ton Arbor Press
    Bridgeport

  • #2
    Had to remove broken exhaust studs from a Mercury Villager, 10 + 4 others on the body, 14 total and got them all, some took 3-4 tries. Almost used up my supply of useful for nothing else old nuts.

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    • #3
      Removing a broken screw by welding on a nut

      That's exactly what the nut and bolt bin is for!

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      • #4
        Nicely done. I often set a washer on first and weld it to the broken stud then weld the nut to the washer. I'm stick welding and it helps to protect the surrounding area from slag & spatter and I find I am less like to fuse the stud to the part it is stuck in.---Meltedmetal
        ---Meltedmetal

        Comment


        • #5
          In addition, there are welding rods made specifically for that purpose. They are great to use if you have them because they are very directional, which allows you to actually weld down inside of a hole, for example, if you needed to (like a broken off tap). They also, generally, have very good ductility and tensile strength. Almost seems like a 312 stainless, real heavy flux and slag coating too.

          Off hand I can think of some I have had for years...and used a little...called extractalloy...catchy name.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
            In addition, there are welding rods made specifically for that purpose. They are great to use if you have them because they are very directional, which allows you to actually weld down inside of a hole, for example, if you needed to (like a broken off tap). They also, generally, have very good ductility and tensile strength. Almost seems like a 312 stainless, real heavy flux and slag coating too.

            Off hand I can think of some I have had for years...and used a little...called extractalloy...catchy name.
            Here is the demo......

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L4zohssWS7I
            .

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            • #7
              thats the stuff. I've never used a washer like that, but I like the idea. In the past, I've placed the nut right over top of the hole from the start. Weld up through the nut but not to it. Then use a wrench and give the nut a turn, which loosens most of the slag. You'll have a brand new gleaming silver tit sticking out of the hole. Clean the slag off the top and put the nut back, then weld the nut to the newly formed gleaming silver tit in the middle of the hole. If I was any good at making youtube videos, I'd give it a shot, but I doubt there would be any of the exciting music playing in the background....

              Comment


              • #8
                I made a quick search for a supplier of Extractalloy to see the price and only found it on E-bay UK. If I run across it somewhere at a reasonable cost I may try some. One of the links that came up was about someone trying to sell it at $200.00 a pound. But I expect that was someone trying to make a quick score as it was much less in the UK.
                ---Meltedmetal

                Comment


                • #9
                  There are lots of ways to use welders to remove broken bolts/studs, but you'd almost think MIG welders were invented specifically for that purpose, they work so well. You have so much control that frequently you don't even have to find an old nut or washer, you just pile some metal on top of the broken fastener and grab it with a Vise-Grip. But even if you are stick-welding, there are multiple methods. I have an old twin carbon-arc torch, and that can be used to get things hot, either with twin or single carbons, depending on what you're dealing with.

                  Aren't all you guys like me in wondering how does any do-it-yourselfer, any homeowner, get along without having welding skills and gear????

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                  • #10
                    I am always finding people that are apparently my "friend" and just so happen to be in need of some sort of welding job. I hate asking people for help, when I find something I need done, I figure out how to do it.
                    But you're right, seems like people any away from stuff like that.

                    Meltedmetal...if you'd like a few sticks of that extract-o-fancy whatever rod, send me your address and I'll mail some to you. I think my LWS may have some on the shelf, I'll have to check. I know it ain't cheap, but I hardly ever use it and I'd love to share if you want.

                    The benefit, as far as I can tell, to using the stick rod for extracting a bolt is when it's recessed in the hole. I don't imagine that mig wire, even dual shield, would do much in the way of providing a heavy flux to protect the threads on the side walls. I certainly see how the smaller, more controllable arc would make short work of most jobs though.

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                    • #11
                      Thanks for all of your comments. It is great to have several different ways to solve a problem.

                      Don
                      Miller Thunderbolt
                      Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
                      Miller Dynasty 200DX
                      Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
                      Lincoln LE 31 MP
                      Lincoln 210 MP
                      Clausing/Colchester 15" Lathe
                      16" DuAll Saw
                      15" Drill Press
                      7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
                      20 Ton Arbor Press
                      Bridgeport

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by old jupiter View Post
                        Aren't all you guys like me in wondering how does any do-it-yourselfer, any homeowner, get along without having welding skills and gear????
                        Haven't we all been someone's "friend" at one time or another?

                        Ryan, thanks for the offer. It is very generous of you. I'm going to look around locally when I get time, and I have some rod I got from a neighbor whose husband died that I will try for extractions when I have some to do. It produces a very heavy slag and is easy strike so it sounds very much like the "extractalloy". Made by Eutectic, I think it is 777. It welds like 6013 which I don't like for welding but might also work okay for bolt extraction.---Meltedmetal
                        ---Meltedmetal

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                        • #13
                          Lotso ways for sure.

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                          • #14
                            Hmmm...if it runs like a 6013, maybe. It could also be some hardfacing. I know castolin eutectic is pretty big in that field.

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                            • #15
                              This is it.
                              https://www.castolin.com/en-CA/product/eutectrode-777

                              ---Meltedmetal
                              ---Meltedmetal

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