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Oh yea, the "mandatory" first cart project...

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  • SdAufKla
    replied
    (And the stunning conclusion!)

    I wanted a secure and snug fit with the gas cylinder itself:

    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]

    The rubber noise isolation was cut from the end of a shop floor mat and glued on with contact cement.

    Here's the "holster" for the GMAW gun:

    [IMG][/IMG]

    The cart is very stable pulling it across the ground from my shop to the barn or other places around the hacienda.

    The rear wheels are 10" "no flat" wheels from Harbor Freight. The front castors are 4" from the same vendor. I used spring lynch pins to keep the rear wheels on since these let me remove the wheels easily as I was working on the cart over time. The rear axel is 3/4" .065 wall tubing.

    The blue paint is Rustoleum "Sail Blue." It's not an exact match for the "Miller Blue" on the welder, but it's as close as I could get without too much expense. (I shopped hard in my local area for one of the OSHA / federal "Safety Blue" paints in the rattle can with no luck.) I applied the blue over a self-etching primer after I gave the cart a final wipe down with lacquer thinner.

    The front handle extension seems to offer good protection for the front of the welder and the cables. It's at a good height to lift the front of the cart up onto concrete slabs or out of small holes and ruts. The basket seems deep enough that stuff will stay in it without being too deep that loading and unloading is a PITA. There's room between the cart and the cylinder for the welder power cable and gas line and the gas regulator to be rotated to the center to keep it away from knocks and bumps.

    I'm sure I could have built the cart out of much smaller materials, but the 2" square, 14ga tube has nice proportions. (I did use 1-1/2" 14ga tube for the angled braces.) That was an "aesthetic" choice rather than an "engineering" one. I just like the "looks" of several other carts made from 2" square tubing that I saw as I was searching for ideas.

    Anyways, it was a fun and interesting project. I learned a lot - this being the first thing I've ever built in all metal from scratch. Still, I'm pleased with the results and the cart seems to meet all of my design criteria. Guess I'll find out how well I did as time goes by...

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  • SdAufKla
    replied
    So, continuing on...

    And here're the final results:

    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]

    I added a holder for the cylinder cap to keep it from rattling around:

    [IMG][/IMG]

    And, to be continued!

    Leave a comment:


  • SdAufKla
    started a topic Oh yea, the "mandatory" first cart project...

    Oh yea, the "mandatory" first cart project...

    Hi all,

    I've been taking a basic welding class at our local community college and after the first month or so, decided to pull the trigger and invest in my own welder, a MM211.

    The instructor asked us all to come up with "class" projects that we could work on. I knew that I wanted to make a cart for my new welder, so I surfed around the interweb and looked at a bunch of carts to get ideas. I then drafted up (old school pencil on graph paper!) some scaled drawings to work out my materials and cuts.

    I knew that I wanted a cart that could be pulled across uneven ground or gravel drives since I'll need to move the welder around the farm. Big wheels and castors with a wide stance and the welder securely bolted down and the cylinder not wobbly were requirements.

    I also liked the carts I saw that had cantilevered shelves. They seemed to offer good and unimpeded access to storage areas. I wanted a storage shelf that had fairly tall sides to keep tools and supplies from rattling off the edges.

    I wanted the welder up high enough that I could change the wire without having to stoop or sit on the floor, same with reaching the front knobs. This height stressed the need for a wide stance and stability.

    Finally, I wanted a design that would protect the front and rear of the welder and allow me to rotate the regulator and gages on the cylinder to a position that was protected from bumps and knocks. Things can get a bit rough around the shop and barn.

    I didn't take many in-progress shots, but here are a couple:

    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]

    You can see my inexpensive Harbor Freight cart in the background. (One of my classmates has already offered to buy it from me. It worked, but it's none too sturdy, and it's very hard to move around on anything but nice smooth concrete.)

    Here's my cart at school, ready to clean up for the final paint:

    [IMG][/IMG]

    Well, bother...

    Ten images and a limit of 4 per post. Guess I'll break this up into multiple posts.

    Hope cut-an-paste will save some time. We'll see...
    Last edited by SdAufKla; 03-20-2015, 10:01 AM. Reason: corrected typo
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