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  • #16
    Mass can be more important than thickness. My Diversion 180 Could be coaxed into a weld on 1/4" if mass wasn't too great. Preheat with acetylene, and change to 4043 or 4943 3/32". There is some chance your machine can't do this weld. It gets expensive, but a mix of helium would help.
    Build up your weld, I've had 1/4" welds crack with the Diversion.
    I now have a Dynasty 280 DX. I don't have this sort of problem!
    Dynasty 280DX
    Bobcat 250
    MM252
    Spool gun
    Twentieth Century 295
    Twentieth Century 295 AC
    Marquette spot welder
    Smith torches

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    • #17
      Keep your filler rod just out of the heat until ready to dip. Bring it in at a 90 degree angle to the tungsten. Dab quickly, move away. Zapster on WW suggests coming in from the side or even from behind the torch. It is critically important that the puddle, not the arc heats the filler. As you dip it in the liquid aluminum, heat will transfer to the filler, melting some.
      Dynasty 280DX
      Bobcat 250
      MM252
      Spool gun
      Twentieth Century 295
      Twentieth Century 295 AC
      Marquette spot welder
      Smith torches

      Comment


      • #18
        miller 180

        Originally posted by walker View Post
        That welder is busting its nuts to form a puddle on anything over 3/16. Even with pre heat you are fighting an uphill battle.
        with me welding this, would it mess up my welder. should i just eat the 90 buck in metal and buy thiner, or pay some one do weld it for me. i just dont know.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by brettbuck View Post
          with me welding this, would it mess up my welder. should i just eat the 90 buck in metal and buy thiner, or pay some one do weld it for me. i just dont know.
          I have seen guys finesse some amazing welds using preheat on some stuff that I thought was too heavy for their equipment...

          So... I would probably try it...
          .

          *******************************************
          The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

          “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

          Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

          My Blue Stuff:
          Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
          Dynasty 200DX
          Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
          Millermatic 200

          TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

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          • #20
            picks

            some picks
            Attached Files

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            • #21
              You've got all the signs of contaminated tungsten. You will have to preheat to make these welds with a Diversion 180. Heat provided by the welder, you'll hit your duty cycle 1.2 minutes into your weld, long before you form a puddle.
              Dynasty 280DX
              Bobcat 250
              MM252
              Spool gun
              Twentieth Century 295
              Twentieth Century 295 AC
              Marquette spot welder
              Smith torches

              Comment


              • #22
                Yes, the black soot indicates you have contaminated your tungsten.

                I suggest you take some smaller pieces and practice different techniques, and pre heating. Then decide if you can weld up this project or move it on to someone with more machine.

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                • #23
                  1. Did you ever get lanthanated tungsten?
                  2. Is your aluminum anodized? If so, then it will be harder for the arc to break through the coating, unless you sand it off.
                  3. Are you brushing the joints with a stainless steel wire brush, prior to trying to tack?

                  It appears that you are attempting to learn to tig aluminum as you fab this project. May I suggest that you practice on some scrap pieces of the same dimensions that you are working on? I just ran a bead on the 1/2" thick end of a piece of irrigation pipe with my 165 (preheating with the arc), so you should be able to do similarly with your 180.

                  The fact that you are getting soot and melting the material before getting a puddle indicates that you are not applying enough heat from the git-go. Get a few practice pieces and work on developing that puddle by flooring the pedal at startup. You can take advantage of some pre-heating by moving the arc around in the direction of where you want to go, then retreat and add filler to the puddle. It is all too common for a tyro to hold back on puddle initiation for fear of melting the work piece, but what you need to do is floor the pedal to get the puddle started and then add the filler, as you progress. Remember to go hot and go fast (relatively speaking). Aluminum tig is not for the fainthearted.
                  Last edited by Goodhand; 09-13-2014, 08:00 PM.

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