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  • ja baudin
    replied
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    Thanks Nick, This is about my speed. Hobbiest projects, gas grills, hinged boxes for boats, boat repairs and the small stuff. Like I said under 100 lbs. Weight is the issue. I have a step up into the shop, so I'll have to be able to pull and lift in. Dont need a massive heavy table, already have one against the wall with railroad ties as legs and 3/4 inch top, plenty stout for banging on a project. Just want something nice and light enough to move into the center of my shop and sit next to in a chair to do my projects. Thanks again guys for the replys, all good ideas.

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  • ihctractor
    replied
    O.K. seriously.....
    Have you considered getting some 1/4" plate, weld some pipe couplers to the bottom to screw pipe legs into and weld a couple brackets on one side to hold two wheels. You would have a fairly stout table that the legs could be unscrewed and the top could be rolled around like a two wheeled cart and stood up against a wall to get it out of the way.

    When space and budgets are tight you gotta use a little imagination.

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  • ihctractor
    replied
    ........is this closer to what were suposed to be talking about?.......
    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Cosco-Juve...-Blue/12168125

    I'd probably beef up the top with some 24 guage steel sheet if it was mine

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  • monte55
    replied
    I think people are losing the fact that he wants an easy to move lightweight table. My welding table has a 42" x 96" x 5/8 top with 6 4x4" x 3'8 wall legs and a lower shelf with bracing and the whole nine yards. Took a forklift to put it into place. I love it but I would not recommend this to the OP because it doesn't fit his needs.. Maybe if we stay on track more and not recommend tables that do not apply to his needs ...we can offer better suggestions. just my thoughts
    Nick

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  • ihctractor
    replied
    There's nothing worse than a table that's too light and spongey and has stuff boucing all over the place when you try to bang on it. My table has a 3" tubing frame with a 4' X 5' X 1" thick top, all sitting on 6" locking casters. It's heavy but moves easily on the shop floor. After using this I'm spoiled and would hate to work on anything lighter!
    You can drill and tap clamping holes, tac weld, and fabricate jigs to a steel top also. Aluminum, in my opinion has way too many downsides.

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  • drpipe
    replied
    Welding table thickness

    My table legs are 6 in sh80. 80 pipe . Top is 3/4 I wouldn't use anything lighter. I have a Wilton vise mounted on one end and a piece of 3x3 angle on one side groove up .. My table has 4x4 by 1/4 square tube frame with fork pockets it has bolts on feet to level up and down pretty classic oilfield table works well

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  • walker
    replied
    " Frame will be 2x2x1/4" tubing,"

    4" pipe or 4X4 Sq tube will be cheaper, stouter, and last longer unprotected than aluminum. It also has the benifit of being able to weld the top on. If you don't want to watch it rust then paint the thing, or clear coat it.

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  • ja baudin
    replied
    All valid points, thanks guys. I completely understand the benifits of a steel top and from the opinions I'll most likely lean that way, but the frame will still have to be alum. Nothing gets me more fired up than rust on my projects that I worked hard on. I'd rather look at aluminum oxide than watch the foot pads of my table rust into the ground. Sad to say but it's going to sit outside, I don't have a concrete slab outside the shop to keep it on either. Frame will be 2x2x1/4" tubing, I figured if it wasn't heavy enough to support the top I could fill the vertical legs with sand. Anyway, I do appreciate the comments, hope you all enjoy labor day. Ja

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  • bobhdus
    replied
    Welding table thickness

    Don't worry about having a steel table outside. My welding table is made completely out of steel "C" channel that used to be a steel wood rack for a fireplace. It's never had rust problems yet. Anyways, regardless you can use all the Aluminum you want but I might still suggest you consider a sheet of 12ga steel over the top and if you want you can even leave the mill scale on it. The reason is, any steel or anything that is harder than the Aluminum will get embedded into the Aluminum top. Those particles will leave awful scratches into your projects. Just my opinion. Have fun building it. There is a cool pre-fab'ed tool holder showcased on www.weldingtipsandtricks.com that holds grinders, drivers, welding accessories etc to add to the table. Later!
    Ps here's the clutter catcher link
    http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/metalworking-hand-tools.html
    Last edited by bobhdus; 09-02-2012, 03:11 PM.

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  • walker
    replied
    I put 4" wheels on my 1/2" steel table that is 4 x 6 and can wheel it around the shop to my hearts content. A little WD-40 on the top keeps it from rusting. even if it does get some rust a wire wheel knocks it off fast. If you want alum for your alum projects just get a thinner sheet to clamp to the top.

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  • Jigantor
    replied
    My welding table is 4mm thick ali.
    When welding rough stuff I place a sheet of ali diamond plate on top to prevent damaging the surface.

    Ji

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  • FusionKing
    replied
    Looking at your list of equipment there and it looks to me you have a pretty decent handle on what you need.
    That said, I'm guessing your wallet will help you make this decision.
    Simply imagine a heavy steel table and go from there.
    Heavy duty legs and all that good stuff. It'll be expensive
    There are many times I wish I had an aluminum top on my table for aluminum work.
    If money isn't a problem, then you may wanna go with stainless instead.
    Back on the aluminum I would say 1/4" would be ok as long as you didn't clamp anything much to it. Anything thicker would be better of course.
    The advice about nothing heavy, no hard (sledgehammer) banging/wailing, or steel mig/stick welding just goes almost without saying.
    I feel the alloy is as important as anything. Go with 6061 and it will be a ton stiffer than say like 3003 or even 5052. Use a heavy frame and barely tack or even tap and bolt the top down and it will stay flat.
    I have a 10ft plate of 5/16ths unknown alloy and it's gonna be a table top for sure someday more than likely. I feel like it can't be beat for aluminum tubing projects like I do on boats.....YMMV.....HTH

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  • Cgotto6
    replied
    Aluminum would get trashed so fast with sharp, burr and slag covered pieces of steel. I would never build a welding table with less than 3/8 steel, and that would need good bracing built into it. I have 3/4 steel for my top. Just my opinions though. I understand you need to be able to move it. Any way you could just build a set of nice casters into a full steel table so it could still be moved? Steel would be fine outside if it got a nice coating everywhere but the top surface. Would just take a little maintaince to clean up the top when you need it.

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  • Scottis1
    replied
    I had an aluminum welding table, don't use it anymore because as soon as you have something clamped on it that overhangs, it would flip. Just wasn't heavy enough. You would want it pretty thick because it flexed a lot too.

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  • monte55
    replied
    I assume you will have a steel base under it. Of course you know you will not weld the alum plate to it so you will need to bolt it. Depending on the bracing under the top, you might get by with 1/4" bit if allowed to get hot during welding it may not stay flat. Myself, I would like to have at least 1/2" top. Then you could have overhang for clamping and such. With only 1/4" top and overhang, it will be too easy to deform the overhang when loadindg something heavy on it and it hits the edge. So much depends on how you will use the table.

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