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Learning to TIG in Chicago ??

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  • bfloyd4445
    replied
    Originally posted by sjmiller
    Every since I took up welding as a hobby, I notice the weld bead on everything around me, from stairs to motor cycles to ....

    I had to drop off a package at FedEx the other day, they have Alum. hand trucks that had butt ugly welds. The bead starts out about 1/4" and is almost 1/2" after 16 inches - no heat control - burn baby burn.

    Now look at an expensive bicycle - the text book ripple every 1/32" - something to strive for.

    Steve
    Hey! Nuttin wrong with that weld, the welder just added his artistic touch. Its a work of art<smile>

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  • sjmiller
    replied
    The Challenge

    Every since I took up welding as a hobby, I notice the weld bead on everything around me, from stairs to motor cycles to ....

    I had to drop off a package at FedEx the other day, they have Alum. hand trucks that had butt ugly welds. The bead starts out about 1/4" and is almost 1/2" after 16 inches - no heat control - burn baby burn.

    Now look at an expensive bicycle - the text book ripple every 1/32" - something to strive for.

    Steve

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  • bfloyd4445
    replied
    Thanks hilruner. good advice. Aluminum gets shinny lookin and then its gone<smile>. I've made a few nice holes in aluminum with a torch, aint at all like steel. I haven't yet even tried to mig aluminum, shoot, just recently learned how to make a half way decent looking bead with good penetration with a mig< lincoln 175plus> on steel. Took me awhile to get the hang of migs automatic feeding of the filler material. I think tig will be easier for me because its more like gas welding even though the experts say its harder to learn.

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  • HILRUNR
    replied
    Learning to Tig

    To answer bfloyd4445's question. Start with steel. If you want to try aluminum you might want to step up to 1/4" plate and remember; as heat builds in the piece your travel speed will have to increase, unless you've got a foot pedal and can reduce amperage.

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  • logic
    replied
    HTP over in Arlington Heights holds a "beginner TIG" class every month or so; give Jeff Noland a call over there, he can give you the details. It was a good newbie introduction to basic TIG welding with an inverter rig for my wife and I. I don't remember specifically, but I think the class was either $75 or $100.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Too early...

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  • bfloyd4445
    replied
    I like that idea. Do I set up the A using aluminum or mild steel? Thanks for the tip HILRUNR. I too am about to dive into tig, I do weld at work when the need arises, or should I say, I splatter at work when the need arises, and your idea sounds like a good way to practice.

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  • HILRUNR
    replied
    Learning to Tig

    I don't know if they have them in the Chicago area, but our high schools in Tennessee have continuing education courses at night for around $75. The local community college also allows you to audit classes for less than full price. There's no way to give enough tips in this forum but here's one - stand two pieces of light gauge metal to form an "A" then tack each end. Practice welding the ridge without filler metal till you get a smooth bead with about 1/32" penetration.

    Good Luck!

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  • drewworm
    replied
    bead quality

    This thread is just what I was looking for. I have a sync 250. I've studied the calculators for tungsten size, filler size, amps, etc. I've studied the educational page on Miller's site. I weld as a hobby, but also can't really seem to get it. I would say my biggest problem is the filler metal. I cannot get it to melt nicely in the puddle - it tends to "stick" to the puddle. Other times it goes right through the puddle, BUT I don't have a hole in the finished workpiece like "burn through".
    Any help?

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  • sjmiller
    replied
    Everyone laugh now - before you read further...

    I had a project design finished, but my metal suppy isn't open on the weekend so I found some aluminum at OSH. I founfd out the hard way that you can't weld anodized aluminium....

    It kind of bursts - when the heat level gets to high.

    Steve

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  • aitkenkingfish
    replied
    slow tig

    I taught myself to tig Im by no means an expert. I purchased a book & a miller 180 recomended by the experts at my local welding supply. you have to go slow I wanted a mig however I was told for the alluminum I weld the tig was the way to go. make sure your weld joint is clean ( very clean) and weld slowly one spot at a time. make sure you are sitting in a comforatable position the dynasty is supose to be eaiser to use than the 180 I purchased. If your metal is not clean it will splater If that happens stop & clean the area. sand wipe with asatone.

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  • sjmiller
    replied
    There is one thing for sure - keep the TIG electrode out of the weld puddle This is a hobby for me and so far removed from what I do - I get a "you're kidding" from peers when they ask what I like to do for fun.

    Let me know what you think about the book when you get it.

    Steve

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  • robzr
    replied
    Hey Steve...looks like the reviewers on amazon agree with you! I ordered it (from buy.com, 10% cheaper than amazon). Thanks for the tip. I'm getting a bit better on the steel, still a little confused on exactly what to do with the torch after the puddle starts. Do you move the puddle in a straight line? Pull back as you add the filler, pause it, move it in circles, or just keep it moving at a steady rate? It seems like all those get the job done, but whats the right way to do it?

    thx

    Rob

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  • sjmiller
    replied
    I would also recommend the book "Welding Principles and Applications" fifth edition by Larry Jeffus - it's not cheap - worth every cent.

    Steve

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  • robzr
    replied
    Thanks for the advice, guys. I ordered the Miller Student package, that does seem like a lot of stuff for $25...I tried some more welds today, and made a few good ones. I think I'm gonna follow WB5JHY's advice and see if I can find someone skilled at TIG to work with me for a couple hours, to make sure I have my hand movements down, and so I know how to read the puddle better...

    Rob

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