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Marine grade stainless + wood slat table

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  • Corgan
    started a topic Marine grade stainless + wood slat table

    Marine grade stainless + wood slat table

    Hi guys, here is my latest project. I've taken some photos through it's life cycle, excuse the long thread but I'm quite happy with how this one is turning out.

    I haven't done the woodwork yet, but the frame is done now. The finished table will have either inlaid slats, flush with the top frame, leaving a 38mm stainless steel border around the wood, or it will have the slats sitting ontop of the frame- have not yet decided which I want to do.

    The table will live in a coastal location close to waves breaking on a headland, there's a fair amount of salt in the air so 316 grade was the call.

    I cut and welded the top frame in about 2/3rds of a day, cut and tacked the legs over a couple of hours and just finished welding the legs in place and grinding down/flushing the welds, which took me 4 hours or so. It wasn't the quickest process but i've probably spent about 12 hours on it so far.

    I had a few issues with getting the frame nice and flat which member HAWK helped me out with in PM's, so a big thanks to you mate. The diagonals came out to within 1mm and when placed on a flat surface the frame rocks maybe 1-2mm which is acceptable for this project.

    All the welding was done with 2.6mm 316L electrodes on a DC stick inverter, running at about 70amps. I definately would like a MIG setup for future projects like this, I can imagine it would be much easier for tacking and keeping distortion under control, not to mention final grinding and flushing of the welds without having to worry about any slag inclusions etc.

    anyway here are some pics. The first weld was shaky and irregular because with that box of electrodes, i was having some serious slag inclusion problems for some reason if i didn't weave excessively. All of todays welds with a fresh box of 316L rods didn't have any of the same problems, so maybe i can put that down to poor rod storage on the last lot (though I had the problem since the box was new so maybe a bad batch)

    Sorry for the ramble i'm just happy with the way it's turning out, can't wait to get the wood cut and in place and christen it with some seaside beers

    Top frame getting welded (tacked it up on the concrete slab) :


    Legs going on:



    Finished frame:


    Would love to hear your opinions on what you think the best looking setup for the wooden slats would be (inside and flush with the frame, sitting ontop of the frame, etc)

    thanks for reading!

  • Corgan
    replied
    hi fshkypr,

    i don't have any pics of the underside but its not hard to visualise with an explanation. the table in the current thread isn't attached in the best of ways but the other pieces i've made are done a bit better

    basically get some 25x25x3 stainless angle (1"x1"x1/8") and cut it so it sits flush inside the frame width-ways

    using an offcut of the timber or something the same thickness as whatever the table top will be, set the depth and stitch weld the SS angles in place. for a straight slatted top i'd put one on either endpiece and two in the middle if it's a big long table.

    now if you're using slats roughly mark out their position and drill holes in the angle supports. i like to do 2 screws per slat per support so i do end up drilling plenty of holes. i should have recommended doing this before welding them in especially if you have a drill press to take some of the pain away

    lastly line up the slats and screw them in from the underside, making sure to keep the slats straight and the gaps even. if you set the depth correctly on all the braces any warped planks will be pulled into line and you should have a flat, flush top

    Leave a comment:


  • regal2800
    replied
    given that this is not on a boat, teak wood would be a waste of money. Ipe is a solid choice for this project. Mangaris would also give the same look and is cheaper then ipe.

    Both these woods last just as well as teak. Teak is popular with the boating industry because it is a light hardwood.

    Leave a comment:


  • fshkypr
    replied
    do you mind posting pics of how the wood is mounted to the frame. trying to do something similar.
    thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Corgan
    replied
    thanks fellas. the tables pretty stiff and stable in general use, as it's not overly large and heavy, so i decided not to cross brace the legs.

    the next piece for my place is going to be a tall, long, skinny serving table arrangement, for the BBQ. i reckon i might do a set of high bar stools to go with it, so it can double as a bar once the servings all done

    the slat table isn't staying with me, so unfortunately it wont be me soaking the suds and watching the waves, but hopefully the recipients enjoy it!

    Leave a comment:


  • Corbinworks
    replied
    Looks Amazing man...Great work A+ Build!

    Leave a comment:


  • Bistineau
    replied
    Fine Job

    The table turned out very nice, almost looks "store bought". This is what I was talking about when I mentioned inlaying the wood in the frame rather than having the wood on top of the frame. It makes a nice contrast of the stainless with the wood. It should last a long time in an outdoor environment.Now all you need, is to make a set of matching chairs to sit on while soaking up the suds. That could make a whole other thread or a continuation of this one. It might be a good idea to make one first, to make sure you had the design and measurements right to suit you. Then make three more identical ones after you are satisfied with how the first turned out.I tend to agree with Sundown on adding the extra piece a few inches below the top for extra strength to the legs. But I guess you can judge how stable it is better than the rest of us since you can lay your hands on it and we can't. Enjoy it for years while watching the surf roll in.

    Leave a comment:


  • Corgan
    replied
    hi guys,

    i finally got round to staining, sealing and screwing down the slat top. took me a few weeks of procrastinating and being busy with other things but i'm pretty happy with how the project came out in the end!

    cheers for the tips



    Leave a comment:


  • SundownIII
    replied
    Looks really good.

    Nice, clean, high grade table you can be proud of for years to come.


    PS: The only thing I would worry about, especially for an "outdoor table", would be the forces put on the leg to frame connection. Without gussets, there's a lot of leverage put on just the weld joint.

    One thing you may want to consider, which would still maintain the "clean look", is to add a 1/2" SS rod running parallel to the horizontal frame and down a couple of inches. It would, based on the apparent height, still allow you to pull a chair in under the table. This would greatly strengthen/stiffen the whole table.
    Last edited by SundownIII; 06-27-2011, 12:06 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Corgan
    replied
    Hi guys,

    Thanks for all the suggestions. I had a chat to a few carpenters that were doing some work on the house and they suggested a timber called Merbau/Kwila (I think its from indonesia, I'm in Australia)

    The price was alright, I paid around $4 AUD per M. I know what you mean about Teak, I think I saw a price tag of something like 25-26/m

    Here's the table with insert clamped in place, i'm going to weld some SS brackets onto the underside of the frame and screw the timber in from below, using 3 slats of the timber as bracing.

    Pretty happy with how it looks, the wood is oil rich and quite hard wearing. I believe it's similar to teak in many ways

    cheers again!

    Leave a comment:


  • Doughboyracer
    replied
    @ SundownIII

    I have to laugh, I agree 100% with what you said and had part of that in my reply, I just chose not to state the first part "out loud" so I took it out.

    Leave a comment:


  • SundownIII
    replied
    Inlaid teak would be nice.

    Disagree wholeheartedly with Donald on his comment "SS and wood don't get along well in a marine environment". Just shows he doesn't have a clue what he's talking about. I've been using a combination of teak and stainless in marine fabrication for years. Expensive, but it lasts and lasts.

    Teak has gone "thru the roof". Years ago when I was building custom swim platforms out of teak and SS, I was paying about $6/bd ft. Last 8/4 teak I bought was over $36/bd ft.

    The manmade plastic decking will hold up well, just doesn't have the "class" of teak. Another option you may want to consider is ipe. Similar to teak but grown in "managed forests" in S. America. Like teak, it's hard on the tools (carbide recommended) and even harder to drill than teak.

    I'd weld a SS "lip" around the bottom of the frame, and fabricate a "drop in" insert made of wood (or whatever you choose). Just a couple of fasteners from underneath would hold it in place. That way the insert would be removable for cleaning/off season storage.
    Last edited by SundownIII; 01-29-2012, 10:18 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Donald Branscom
    replied
    Originally posted by Doughboyracer View Post
    ...recycled plastic decking "lumber." That too will hold up better than wood.
    Glass tops will break, and granite or slate will break your mug, plates, bottles or any other glass item dropped from as little as a few inches.
    Or use cedar...
    Excellent ideas.
    Maybe the plastic decking lumber could be sanded to give it a "different" appearence.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doughboyracer
    replied
    Look into...

    ...recycled plastic decking "lumber." That too will hold up better than wood.
    Glass tops will break, and granite or slate will break your mug, plates, bottles or any other glass item dropped from as little as a few inches.
    Or use cedar...
    Last edited by Doughboyracer; 06-17-2011, 08:46 AM.

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  • TerryL
    replied
    table top options

    You could try a slate top inlaid in the table. It would hold up to just about anything and is not going to need much maintenance over its lifetime.

    Leave a comment:

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