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  • Jolly Roger
    replied
    I use a 110V lincoln for running flux core for on site railing repair (was purchased specifically for that) but I have used it for other things as well. It is great for small stuff and short welds, but it is severely limited by it's duty cycle. I also have a Lincoln weld-pak 155 (known as the pro-mig 175 now) that is used on gas for fabbing railings, doors, gates, etc. It is excellent and will run all day long on the mid setting. I have used it on 1/4" steel with flux core with no problems. My EX300 (XMT 304 to you guys) actually weighs less than the 155 with a 10 lb spool of wire in it. I too am an artist and would really recommend the 220V machine. You will find it is worth the cost of having an outlet run. Or you could just get an extension cord for it and run it off your dryer outlet.

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  • gofastdaddy4
    replied
    Originally posted by aametalmaster View Post
    I don't know what kind of garden items you want to weld but i don't think you will be happy with a 110v welder. I would aim for a small 220v mig even if it means adding a 220v plug. Just my .02...Bob
    i agree you want be satisfied with a 110 volt not hot enough.

    Leave a comment:


  • SavageSunJeep
    replied
    Originally posted by Miller_Jon View Post
    I just wanted to throw a few comments out on the Auto-Set. It is a great machine because it is actually like having two machines in one. First there is the Auto-Set feature, which really does work well. Yes I am a product manager for Miller, but I am also a huge car guy. I don't weld everyday, more like every couple of weeks, but the welder I use most is a MM140 Auto-Set. And because I don't weld everyday, most of the time I do use the Auto-Set feature.

    What I really wanted to clarify is that the Auto-Set machines can also be set in manual mode just like all Millermatic welders. The parameter chart is still on the inside of the door and both the voltage and wire feed speed knobs can be infinitely adjusted, for those circumstances when you don't want to or can't use the Auto-Set feature.

    Hope this helps!
    Jon, that was helpful and I think having the duality of the welder is truly a bonus. Kinda makes ke whish I had bought the 180 autoset now. But my exp albeit LIMITED in welding is that every time I go to weld requires a fine tuning. I do know that as time goes by and my skills improve some I make some adjustments of my own at the arc and how I manage the puddle...but that comes with time.

    But I do LOVE my MM 180 and truly feel it is a major step up over the MM140 for the world in which I weld...on my off road Jeep. I weld in a space that covers 1/8th - 1/4 with heavy emphasis on 3/16th.

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  • Miller Jon
    replied
    A little more info on the Auto-Set

    I just wanted to throw a few comments out on the Auto-Set. It is a great machine because it is actually like having two machines in one. First there is the Auto-Set feature, which really does work well. Yes I am a product manager for Miller, but I am also a huge car guy. I don't weld everyday, more like every couple of weeks, but the welder I use most is a MM140 Auto-Set. And because I don't weld everyday, most of the time I do use the Auto-Set feature.

    What I really wanted to clarify is that the Auto-Set machines can also be set in manual mode just like all Millermatic welders. The parameter chart is still on the inside of the door and both the voltage and wire feed speed knobs can be infinitely adjusted, for those circumstances when you don't want to or can't use the Auto-Set feature.

    Hope this helps!

    Leave a comment:


  • SavageSunJeep
    replied
    Originally posted by mikeswelding View Post
    I'm stunned that no one has recommended the Passport! True, the initial cost is a little steep (about double the 140) but it's got it all. It will run on 110 or 220. It's rated for 1/4" on 110 and 3/8" on 220, better than the 180, and the same as the 212. It weighs 45 lb. compared to 72 lb for the 180, and 192 lb for the 212. It has an internal gas bottle for onsite work, as well as a fitting for an external gas source. It also has a setting for stainless, and the case is practically bulletproof.

    I have a 175 in the shop and the Passport stays in the truck. But if I could only have one wirefeed, it would be the Passport.
    Not sure if ANYONE can toss at rocks at a passport...what could be one of the best welders on the market today.

    That said I wrestled with that but the MM180 won.

    1) I see little need for a portable unit and where I go that I would need one is off road and there is NO place to plug it. This means some serious mods and $$ on my Jeep to bring it with me. Dual batteries, alternators, switches etc.
    2) There are several welding set-ups that are overall better for remote use in my Jeep.
    3) I have no desire to be the trail "welder-ho" for sometimes as many as 30-40 Jeeps on a trail run.

    Bottom line my welder stays in my shop and I saved some bucks...besides my wife said if I spend that much money on the Passport I don't get my Hypertherm Powermax 30 Plasma cutter I just picked up Monday. 1 MM 180 + 1 HPM 30 = Happy Happy Joy Joy Vs 1 MMP. You do the math But I would SURE like to have one.

    Leave a comment:


  • mikeswelding
    replied
    Passport

    I'm stunned that no one has recommended the Passport! True, the initial cost is a little steep (about double the 140) but it's got it all. It will run on 110 or 220. It's rated for 1/4" on 110 and 3/8" on 220, better than the 180, and the same as the 212. It weighs 45 lb. compared to 72 lb for the 180, and 192 lb for the 212. It has an internal gas bottle for onsite work, as well as a fitting for an external gas source. It also has a setting for stainless, and the case is practically bulletproof.

    I have a 175 in the shop and the Passport stays in the truck. But if I could only have one wirefeed, it would be the Passport.

    Leave a comment:


  • rickhunt@backroads.net
    replied
    keeping an open mind

    If you'll keep an open mind and perhaps consider some smaw. I'd take a look at a thunderbolt xl 225 ac/dc. its 220v and takes more skill but for a low price welder I don't think you can beat the quality. I think you'd be happier with It than with a low price 110 volt mig machine with a short duty cycle.
    Just trying to get you the most for your money.

    Rick

    Leave a comment:


  • SavageSunJeep
    replied
    Originally posted by opsranch View Post
    Don,

    Auto set seems to me to be too limiting. When you are welding different types of steel (I use a lot of scrap that is of unknown origin) in different thickness, its nice to find that perfect heat and wire speed to make it weld nice, like welding 10 ga sheeet metal to 1/16" or 1/8" angle. Inside my MM210 I bought in January there is a chart that gives the recomended settings both steel and aluminum (that dual gun set up is so cool), I've found that they are just a place to start. Each job with new materials, positions, and weld type
    needs to be fine tuned. That's all I meant. My experience with auto set (with a 140) is about 10 minutes, so I am no expert.

    Bob
    That was my thinking, but what would I know. True, it seems that everything I do I have to "fine tune" wire speed and amps. So far what I have noticed is that my MM180 always needs less amps/wire speed than the chart calls for.

    Yes auto set seems more like a gimmick type thing to me.

    Thanks for the reply.

    Leave a comment:


  • opsranch
    replied
    Why not auto set?

    Don,

    Auto set seems to me to be too limiting. When you are welding different types of steel (I use a lot of scrap that is of unknown origin) in different thickness, its nice to find that perfect heat and wire speed to make it weld nice, like welding 10 ga sheeet metal to 1/16" or 1/8" angle. Inside my MM210 I bought in January there is a chart that gives the recomended settings both steel and aluminum (that dual gun set up is so cool), I've found that they are just a place to start. Each job with new materials, positions, and weld type
    needs to be fine tuned. That's all I meant. My experience with auto set (with a 140) is about 10 minutes, so I am no expert.

    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • SavageSunJeep
    replied
    Originally posted by opsranch View Post
    If I replace it it will be with a MM140 (not auto set).

    For a first welder they are perfect, but can't be compared with a 220v machine like my MM210. But they are not competing. Go with the MM140,
    you won't be disappointed.

    Bob
    Why NOT auto set? That said even tho I am all new to this I am not sure I would want it because I would rather do my own adjustments...but I want to hear what a pro thinks.

    Albeit I started out with a MM140/110V I found nothing but limitations. But then I work on my Jeep and most of the stuff I do is 3/16 to 1/4. Not being a pro welder and having a smaller machine only held me back. I am SURE that if I were a better welder it is not a problem.

    Same, same in my world of computers. An expert user can get by with a LOT less RAM than a novice. But then you "know the ropes".

    Leave a comment:


  • opsranch
    replied
    110 Welders

    Don't sell the 110 mig machines short. I have had two, both Lincolns, the first wore out after years of steady use and abuse. The second one is still going strong. I wouldn't want to be without it. If I replace it it will be with a MM140 (not auto set). They are easy to carry around and very versatile. They are limited with solid wire and gas. Best really for 1/8" or less. With .035 and flux core wire you can easily weld 3/16" to 1/4". The keys are, absolutey clean metal, very short "stick out" and proper speed. They will run off a small generator and can be plugged in anywhere.
    For a first welder they are perfect, but can't be compared with a 220v machine like my MM210. But they are not competing. Go with the MM140,
    you won't be disappointed.

    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • Sagefarm
    replied
    All very good input guys! I really appreciate it!

    Leave a comment:


  • tnjind
    replied
    I have a Hobart Handler 135. I have probably ran 250-280 pounds of wire through it so far. I have other welders, larger mig and a tig. But the little 135 is the most versatile machine I have.
    If the 135 crapped out today then I would have to replace it. period.

    Leave a comment:


  • SavageSunJeep
    replied
    I started with a MM 135 and wish I had bought more...I just recently did and I picked up a MM 180. I added a dedicated 220V line to my garage and the difference in welding is like day and night. The 220v/MM180 is a sweet unit and is good for about 5/16's in welding one-pass. It is a smoother and more fun to use welder in my novice view.

    Don't get me wrong the 135/140 is a sweet setup and the 180 is now available in "auto-set". I don't know enough to know if auto set is a good thing or not.

    I picked up my MM180 off e bay with no tax and free shipping from Indiana Oxygen and could not be happier.

    Leave a comment:


  • pthunberg
    replied
    I have the MM 130 XP an older version of the 140 with no auto set. I primarily use it for welding things up to about 1/8” anything more and it just isn’t hot enough. That said I love this welder, it gets lots of use, mostly because it is so easy to move around. I have run a lot of wire through it with no problems at all. Probably around 25 large spools. I use .024 solid wire at the lower settings for 18 to 14Ga tubing and sheet and .035 for thicker. This welder definitely has a place in any shop. It would not be a good do all machine. It just doesn’t have the heat needed for thicker stuff. If you have another welder or think you will need portability in the future and will buy a larger machine for the shop buy a 140. If not than go as big as your budget and power source will allow, you can always turn it down.

    Paul

    Leave a comment:

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