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Job Pricing Issues I'M In a depressed slump.

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  • CrazyHorse!
    started a topic Job Pricing Issues I'M In a depressed slump.

    Job Pricing Issues I'M In a depressed slump.

    It seems that I am having a issue with pricing out my welding services, people call all the time inquiring about welding work they need done now I charge by the hour and by the job in some cases; my rates for shop & portable welding are very reasonable I would like to know what you think the issue with picking up work may be.

    Here is an example and (( just an example only )) had 3 different people call me about doing some portable welding in the last two weeks.
    And they mentioned 2 other local welders they were waiting on for estimates, before they decided on whom to go with, now the other two welders and I all know each other.

    I know my rates are either very comparative with one of the other guys and much cheaper than the other guy, now we don’t discuss our jobs with each other nor about each other to any potential customer, but we do barter and swap materials and consumables back and forth with each other when in a pinch just scratching each others back here and there

    Now it seems they pick up most of the jobs and I for the most part just get passed up
    By the customer, could it be the customer thinks that if my bid is lets say 400.00 bucks cheaper than other welders in the same field that I am just to inexperienced or quality would not be as good.

    Even though I have and provide very good creditable references of creditability and quality work it seems to not carry any weight.

    So what is your take on the issue I am having picking up work
    Just curious’

    Thanks in advance for your input.

  • treflip
    replied
    "I learned a while back something that at every funeral the average number of people their are between 100-150, one person knows an average of say 150, so pass around a couple boxes of business cards, the work"

    Didn't they make a movie with Vince Vaughn about that... I think it was called Wedding Crashers or something.

    Get outa here man. So do you know the deceased or are they just some random funeral you go to? WTF?

    Leave a comment:


  • whoaha
    replied
    Sell Yourself.....

    I learned a while back something that at every funeral the average number of people their are between 100-150, one person knows an average of say 150, so pass around a couple boxes of business cards, the work doesn't come to you if they don't know your their and alot of times someones got your card handy just when they need work done. And when I was younger I had lost alot of repeat customers because of my mouth, cleaned it up, and my appearance and things got better, developed a professional attitude.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pro-Fab
    replied
    My biggest asset in snagging the next job from new customers, is my portfolio. Make a very tidy portfolio showing your best work. Make sure to cover many different types of work in this portfolio. When you arive at the new customers place. Introduce yourself with a very strong presence and make sure to be very polite. After your formal greeting and meetings. Tell them that you are excited to have the privilage of showcasing your artwork in their place. you must find a way to do this with out seeming fake. then sit them down and show them your portfolio atarting with the type of product they are interested in. After you are through with that section you state that you can incorporate any of your designs from other areas as well and proceed to show them the other work in your portfolio. THis will tend to generate thoughts of other stuff theyu may enjoy. Also make sure to phone them and keep them updated. Call them about an hour before you meet with them reminding them of your meeting. if it is early in the morning try to call the day before.

    Dont push the other products but make sure they see them because it will generate interest in most cases.

    True story of how presenting other work has pushed my business... I show up at a customers house who is interested in a small fireplace screen but doesnot like run of the mill products. I sit down with her to show her some gates that she might like the design of since i didnt have any fireplace screens in my portfolio yet. One particular gate sparked her interest as a wall trellus for her vines in the front. and 2 minutes later when we got to the fence section of my portfolio, she said" I didnt know you could do fence as well!" So from a measly little $450 fireplace screen I turned it into a $10,000 ordeal and recieved a $500 tip after works completion.

    Leave a comment:


  • Freelance Fabber
    replied
    If you have a few old contacts that you do irregular work for, it sometimes helps to stop by their shop or site and have a friendly coffee for them. You can bring donuts or coffee, or not. You can ask for work, or not, but usually after a friendly chat, the foreman will ask around if theres any welding needed.

    Leave a comment:


  • STRENGTH AND POWER
    replied
    Originally posted by CrazyHorse! View Post
    STRENGTH AND POWER

    I was honestly a bit surprised as to the responses I received.... I took your advice and insight from others here and not lightly!

    Anyway I sent out some e-mails to some past and recent clients and It was very productive.

    So Now the worm has turned so to speak for now, I set up a couple of service deals with some previous customers minor repairs but enough to keep me some what busy with no pressure.

    And now there will be some Income coming in that would have not been coming in other wise.

    Thanks for the advice
    Sometimes a different perspective is all that's needed.

    Scott

    Leave a comment:


  • CrazyHorse!
    replied
    Originally posted by STRENGTH AND POWER View Post
    New customers are good and always needed, unless they are a pain in the @ss, but those usually show themselves pretty quick.

    Don't forget about your existing customers. Touch base with them, keep your name fresh. If you have a customer who has you continually repair equipment, think about setting up a service agreement so you go there on a regular basis.

    When it looks like things are slowing down, I start emailing past customers, more often than not, I get orders.


    STRENGTH AND POWER

    I was honestly a bit surprised as to the responses I received.... I took your advice and insight from others here and not lightly!

    Anyway I sent out some e-mails to some past and recent clients and It was very productive.

    So Now the worm has turned so to speak for now, I set up a couple of service deals with some previous customers minor repairs but enough to keep me some what busy with no pressure.

    And now there will be some Income coming in that would have not been coming in other wise.

    Thanks for the advice

    Leave a comment:


  • m.k.swelding
    replied
    [QUOTE=FusionKing;225525]I think sometimes you will find that the customer already knows who he WANTS to use because of that person's reputation and he is simply making sure that person is in the range of cost that his competition is.


    Yep I think ur right

    Leave a comment:


  • Ingle's Trailer Sales
    replied
    what you would charge
    For let’s say replacing the ball socket /tongue on a standard 16’ utility trailer?? Just labor only.[/QUOTE]

    I charge $100.00 and supply the coupler @ my lot [some couplers will cost more] just a thought call the person or company you quoted job for and ask them ; It could help to know from them.

    Leave a comment:


  • STRENGTH AND POWER
    replied
    New customers are good and always needed, unless they are a pain in the @ss, but those usually show themselves pretty quick.

    Don't forget about your existing customers. Touch base with them, keep your name fresh. If you have a customer who has you continually repair equipment, think about setting up a service agreement so you go there on a regular basis.

    When it looks like things are slowing down, I start emailing past customers,more often than not, I get orders.

    Leave a comment:


  • AnotherDano
    replied
    We're all hanging on by our fingertips. But it seems like when that happens, I do find myself looking 'up' a bit more often. Here's hoping that something will break open for you - and soon.
    Good luck.

    Leave a comment:


  • CrazyHorse!
    replied
    Well Guys I wanted to say Thank you to all of you who chimed in on this

    I do the leg work as well as the phone work to try to keep work coming in
    It has been really hard in the last couple of years for me going through a lot of transitions
    With health and financial issues not to mention starting over.

    Welding really is not something new to me but all have enlightened me as to how the welding industry has changed in the way people think and do business how they pick who they will hire for a job as well as how to decide on the type of jobs a welder will want to take on. And that I should stick to my price but it’s ok to bend within reason
    To keep the work coming, with out taking a job that would just be nothing more than free labor I mean I know I’m an ok guy and skilled enough to make any customer happy with my work and I always try to exceed their expectations, but I’m not so ok I can afford to give my skills/labor away for free. Well enough about that for now.

    The good thing is I have had a few people call me today who have decided to accept my bids on work they were needing, “all in house work” which will make me some $$ hopefully it will help keep the mortgage company off my butt for a weeks or two I Hope!

    So thanks Again Guys your input has been helpful.

    CH!
    Last edited by CrazyHorse!; 02-17-2010, 06:21 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sonora Iron
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Rogers View Post
    Not to hijack the thread...
    I had a contractor call one time with some loose shoes on a big frontend loader.
    Didn't think a thing about it, drove to the sight (one hour each way) and got informed that he was only going to pay $20.00 a shoe to get them welded back on.
    I was their and into it for fuel (had to get that back) Hmmmm 3 loose shoes $60.00 bucks. Cleaned up the shoes, reached into the rod box pulled out the box of stainless steel, welded them back in. Harrrrrrrr!!!!!!!!!
    Three weeks later, he shows up on the front porch yelling and screaming about it costing him $200.00 to get the shoes cut out (carbon arc) and another $200.00 to get new shoes welded on.
    1st question, Did the shoes come loose. Welllllll no.
    2nd question, How come you didn't call me. Welllllll, I let a buddy do it.
    Their's the street my friend.
    Moral of the story, more than one way to skin a cat, errrr rat.

    Michael
    I love it!

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    That is a good one, worth remembering. I am not pizzed I didn't get the job, it was my own fault, I really didn't need to say anything, I had already said I couldn't quote it till I saw the thing and then it just kind of popped out of my mouth.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Rogers
    replied
    Originally posted by JSFAB View Post
    Berry, don't get mad, get even.

    Case in point, last grape harvest had to redo the belt-drive on one side of a grape harvestor,,,, Did it in one day, had to improvise a bit, but it's all fine, harvestor was ready to go that night. Customer called me a few weeks ago, need to do the other side (same hours), I put him off for now .... so he had somebody else help him. Fine, except for the fact it cost him a $400 hydraulic motor, that was destroyed in the process. Believe me, if there is a problem with that side in the middle of harvest next season, and he calls me, the price goes up.
    Not to hijack the thread...
    I had a contractor call one time with some loose shoes on a big frontend loader.
    Didn't think a thing about it, drove to the sight (one hour each way) and got informed that he was only going to pay $20.00 a shoe to get them welded back on.
    I was their and into it for fuel (had to get that back) Hmmmm 3 loose shoes $60.00 bucks. Cleaned up the shoes, reached into the rod box pulled out the box of stainless steel, welded them back in. Harrrrrrrr!!!!!!!!!
    Three weeks later, he shows up on the front porch yelling and screaming about it costing him $200.00 to get the shoes cut out (carbon arc) and another $200.00 to get new shoes welded on.
    1st question, Did the shoes come loose. Welllllll no.
    2nd question, How come you didn't call me. Welllllll, I let a buddy do it.
    Their's the street my friend.
    Moral of the story, more than one way to skin a cat, errrr rat.

    Michael

    Leave a comment:

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