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  • Dragster Chassis Kits

    I am seriously interested in welding, up to the point of wanting to buy a machine and build my own 4130 dragster chassis. Who makes a good yet reasonably priced chassis kit, and what tig machine would be good for a project like this? I am considering the Miller Econotig, since I do not plan on becoming a professional welder, but am not sure if this is enough machine.

    Please help!!

    Scott
    Y'All Hold My Beer And Watch This!!!

  • #2
    Hey Scott,
    Have you tried posting this in the motorsports or gear heads boards? You may have better luck there getting info on what you need.

    All we (I mean I do ) do on this board is brag about the size of our welders and who can lay the longest bead.....Hahahaha!!

    Sorry to those who may have taken offence..As you will come know I have a twisted sence of reality and a sence of humor to match...
    Will it weld? I loooove electricity!

    Miller 251/30A spool
    Syncro200
    Spectrum 625
    O/A
    Precix 5x10 CNC Router12"Z
    Standard modern lathe
    Cheap Chinese mill that does the trick... sort of...
    horizontal 7x12 bandsaw
    Roland XC540 PRO III
    54" laminator
    hammer and screwdriver (most used)
    little dog
    pooper scooper (2nd most used...)

    Comment


    • #3
      look at the syncro 180 or a 200 it wont cost much more than the econotig and it will be tons easier to use .. as for the kits look at chassiworks or s&w even jerry bickell has some kits
      Miller 250MP
      Miller synchro 180sd
      Miller spectrum 375
      Spoolmate 30-A

      Comment


      • #4
        Not to discourage, but this is what happens when newbie's weld dragsters:
        http://www.break.com/index/time-fire-your-welder.html

        Seriously, being "interested" in welding is a long way from being able to weld a chassis safely. Go take a welding class and then spend some time on less dangerous projects before taking on something serious.

        BTW, I'd recommend the Synchro 180/200 also, just the right size for alot of people.

        Tom

        Comment


        • #5
          Do you think the crowd is laughing or wondering if he's okay??

          Personally , Im laughing. Hahahahaha!! oops..

          Scott, If you do get yourself a good welder ( i have a 200) Do some practice and see if you can actually lay a good bead. I find tig'in steel difficult for what ever reason. MAybe im just too picky and dont like the way my welds look. Its not an easy thing to do but it is possible and personally I would rather practice for a number of hours before putting something together thats gonna be going 150 mph or more. No dissin going on here just concern.
          Will it weld? I loooove electricity!

          Miller 251/30A spool
          Syncro200
          Spectrum 625
          O/A
          Precix 5x10 CNC Router12"Z
          Standard modern lathe
          Cheap Chinese mill that does the trick... sort of...
          horizontal 7x12 bandsaw
          Roland XC540 PRO III
          54" laminator
          hammer and screwdriver (most used)
          little dog
          pooper scooper (2nd most used...)

          Comment


          • #6
            Same topic posted on Motorsports. Same video footage (on YouTube) referenced in "Bad Welds?" thread - also shows an afterwards video.

            Later,
            Jason
            Later,
            Jason

            Professional Spark Generator by Trade.

            Comment


            • #7
              Too **** Funny

              Should have been on America's Funniest Home Videos!


              Originally posted by tdkkart View Post
              Not to discourage, but this is what happens when newbie's weld dragsters:
              http://www.break.com/index/time-fire-your-welder.html

              Seriously, being "interested" in welding is a long way from being able to weld a chassis safely. Go take a welding class and then spend some time on less dangerous projects before taking on something serious.

              BTW, I'd recommend the Synchro 180/200 also, just the right size for alot of people.

              Tom
              Y'All Hold My Beer And Watch This!!!

              Comment


              • #8
                I appreciate the concern

                I appreciate the concern for my safety, and agree that no absolute beginner should do this. I plan on taking a welding course at the local Jr. College, but was merely looking for advice on a frame kit and a machine. Sounds like the Syncrowave 200 is the way to go. Let me ask you all this: Is an inverter type machine a better way to go? I may be on the wrong track, but I seemed to have gotten the idea that they use less input power than the syncrowave type machines. Is this true, or am I way off base?

                Thanks for all the help!

                Scott
                Y'All Hold My Beer And Watch This!!!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Inverters......I looked at inverters real hard before I bought my 180, I just couldn't justify the money. On one hand there's alot of versatility and adjustability to an inverter, on the other hand people have been sticking parts together hust fine with transformers since the invention of welding.

                  Simplicity and budget won out. I've found that misery loves adjustments, a transformer machine with only 2 knobs simplifies alot, and eliminates possible frustration. A DC-only inverter would have been in the budget, but I wanted the possibility of AC for some small aluminum jobs. A used 180 came up and I jumped on it, so far I'm perfectly happy.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Kinda the same here. I was looking at the Dynasty line up and then the guy told me how much...
                    As well, Since I am so new to the process and the machines, I figured easier would be better than complicated when it comes to setting up a machine.

                    Yeah the dynasty will do everything short of gold plated aluminum welds and needs less input current, but they are better suited to someone who has a little more experience.
                    Besides, the syncro200 is pretty forgiving.. less controls - easier to get the basics into place. you have to learn to walk before you can run ...

                    maybe in a couple of years when the machine has payed for itself a few times over, I'll spring for the better one, but I need to practice right now and the best way to get a good bead is to get going.. not futz with what does what and why...
                    Will it weld? I loooove electricity!

                    Miller 251/30A spool
                    Syncro200
                    Spectrum 625
                    O/A
                    Precix 5x10 CNC Router12"Z
                    Standard modern lathe
                    Cheap Chinese mill that does the trick... sort of...
                    horizontal 7x12 bandsaw
                    Roland XC540 PRO III
                    54" laminator
                    hammer and screwdriver (most used)
                    little dog
                    pooper scooper (2nd most used...)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I build my own moly dragsters and altereds. 4 so far and thinking about another one. I started doing it because way back when, it was a 2 day trip to anyone that was building race cars. Now, they are all over the place.

                      The first one took me darn near 8 months spare time just to fit and weld up the tubing because I over thought every little thing (which is good). The second only took a month. Anyway, you will enjoy the process and when you want to make a change at midnight you can. One thing I did in the beginning was to go to the races early and take pictures of the various parts of the chassis for inspiration and validation. My wife laughs when she sees the scrap book because there isn't a picture of a whole car but if it was a name car I can tell her who built it.

                      Digger kits and parts can be found at Mark williams Enterprises, S&W race cars, california chassis engineering (Dave Tuttle) and others. Do a google.
                      MW has everything and ships timely. Tuttle does neat stuff and is a one man band. He is likely to be more helpful with questions after purchase. S&W is fine also I hear. Just haven't delt directly with them myself.

                      While I have a larger machine I have worked with the Econotig. Once in a while someone local buys one to build a chassis and chickens out. They fit and tack it up. Then I drop by and finish up or give them a lesson or two. The econo will do the job nicely as you are only working with 058-.085 wall moly. You can even do some thin aluminum with it. Get the 20 series torch with the bendable head. Great for chassis work. Don't let them sell you the bigger torch. You will want a Miller or Speedglas auto on helmet.

                      I think the econtig has a decent resale history when it comes time to step up the juice (and you will). They don't stick around long locally when someone steps up or gets out. In fact, a friend is retiring from racing and his will probably come up. I bet it hasn't got 80 hours on it.

                      First thing you can make is your chassis jig and fixturing.

                      Have a safe race
                      Dave Koehler
                      www.koehlerinjection.com
                      "Never let a race car know that you are in a hurry."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have never used anything but miller tig machines, all of them old as in pre 1975. I do have an '04 Syncrowave 250DX Tigrunner with the factory water cooler. Someday I will have enough juice to fire it off. I just today bought a used lincoln invertec v300, but it is in canada and won't be here for about 10 days or so. Once I get everything set up I will post my impressions of the inverter. I have spoken with guys who have used the tiny inverter tig machines (the shoebox size things) and they love 'em. I figure we would have a love hate relationship though. I'd love it til it overheated and then I would hate it til it cooled off (much like my weldpak hd, but nothing can beat it for what I got it for). I tend to work the you know what out of my machines, and therefore tend to go oversize. I prefer 100% duty cycle at 200+ amps myself, but this is no hobby shop and I can't charge for it while it is cooling down. There are a couple of the older miller tig machines on ebay right now for cheap, real cheap as of last night. The same model I learned on, and if I hadn't been in serious need of a multi-process power supply I would have gone after one. The thing about the old ones is they tend to just work and work and work with no boards to blow out.
                        Lincoln: Eagle 10,000, Weld-Pak HD, Weld-Pak 155, AC-225, LN-25 wirefeeder
                        Miller: Syncrowave 250DX Tigrunner
                        Westinghouse: 400+ amp AC
                        ThermalArc Handy wirefeeder
                        1 Harris, 3 Victor O/A rigs
                        Arcair gouger
                        Too many other power toys to list.

                        Do it right, do it once. And in all things ya get what ya pay for.

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