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  • KBar
    started a topic Welding Torch

    Welding Torch

    Check out the picture. Has anyone ever used one of these and if so, how does it work ? It is an old welding torch that used alcohol as fuel.
    Attached Files

  • jonnymag
    replied
    Something else you could try... Since he thinks it was used for jewelry soldering, you might try to find a jeweler that's been in business a long time. Maybe he/she would know.

    Or maybe their retired and talkative father/grandfather. When I was a kid, I used to volunteer at a retirement home doing handyman work. There was an elderly woman, a retired seamstress, who liked to tell me everything there was to know about sewing, sewing machines, sewing machine repair, life in the 1930s, "taxi dance" clubs... You never know when that information might come in handy.

    Leave a comment:


  • jonnymag
    replied
    Since the label is visible in your original photo, have you tried to Google the manufacturer, model name/number, etc.? You might be able to find something that way.

    By the way, to narrow down your Google search, you might try the following:

    1. Use " " for exact phrases:

    "ACME alcohol torch"
    "ACME Model 100x"

    2. Use boolean logic, if you understand that stuff (AND, OR, +, -, "):

    "ACME alcohol torch" OR "ACME Model 100x" - "Wylie Coyote"

    (which just means, search for ACME alcohol torch or ACME Model 100x without any references to Wylie Coyote)

    3. Use Google advanced search page:

    http://www.google.com/advanced_search?hl=en

    (just fill in the proper blanks and it does the boolean logic for you)

    Good luck

    Leave a comment:


  • dabar39
    replied
    Glad you were able to get some info on the torch, interesting stuff, but I'd still like to see one in use. Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • KBar
    replied
    Torch explanation from a professional

    I received this email reply from the web site. I wanted everyone to see it in case they have a torch like it.

    Ken:

    Sorry for the delay.

    I do not recommend lighting any antique blow torch, gasoline or alcohol.

    This particular torch is used for light soldering and possibly jewelry repair and other jobs that require a small but hot flame.

    The two big hex nuts are for the two fuel chambers. One chamber holds fuel for the burner head, where the actual flame comes from, and the other chamber holds fuel to operate the warming wick, which is contained in the capped angular pipe that comes out of the top. The cap prevents the alcohol from evaporating during periods of nonuse.

    These units use pure denatured alcohol, not rubbing alcohol. Please see my miniature torch section on my website for more information.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bareback Jack
    replied
    hey, wow, there is a scene in a John Wayne movie that acutally uses one of these! It is called "The Shadow of the Eagle" and is from the 30's. They used it to "make him talk" in the movie, but it's the same thing.

    Leave a comment:


  • KBar
    replied
    Originally posted by jonnymag View Post
    Try this guy: http://www.blotorches.com/miniatur.html Seems to be a collector of old alcohol torches.

    Also, I think the alcohol torches they use for wax casting uses denatured alcohol as fuel.
    I found this on the web site with a picture, exactly like mine. I am going to email them, see if I can get more detailed information.


    One of the more interesting miniature blow torches is the two chamber alcohol. These came in two flavors, one with a baffle/mix chamber and one without. In the case of the type without a mix chamber, the auxiliary wick must be burning at all times for the torch to work. The self generation can only occur in a torch with the mix chamber/baffle and therefore, once the torch is up to operating temperature, the wick can be blown out. These are very beautiful little torches and they are lit very easily and come up to operating temperature very quickly.

    Leave a comment:


  • jonnymag
    replied
    Try this guy: http://www.blotorches.com/miniatur.html Seems to be a collector of old alcohol torches.

    Also, I think the alcohol torches they use for wax casting uses denatured alcohol as fuel.
    Last edited by jonnymag; 09-22-2007, 12:07 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • gary k.
    replied
    "NO", It only hurt when I woke up. "SORRY" wrong kind of alcohol.

    Leave a comment:


  • 6010
    replied
    I just thought of something. Back when these torches were used it was probably easy to get fuel for them. Liquor stills were usually strategically located in the community. They could probably uses these torches for welding, because the stuff they made back then burned a lot hotter than what we have today.

    Leave a comment:


  • 6010
    replied
    I have seen these before and my father had one, although I never saw him use it. I think it was a plumbing tool to use with the cast iron pipe. The seems were filled with lead. I am glad we have PVC pipe now.

    Leave a comment:


  • M-Tech
    replied
    The worst that can happen?

    Originally posted by Pyro View Post
    ... but i have welded beer cans and i use more like 18amps or so... however the more beer i consume (to empty the cans) the worse i weld
    Quote from the Motorsports message board.

    On the other hand, for some of us - the more we consume the prettier the beads look.

    That's got to be for soldering, and I think they were used a lot in fabricating the embossed tin ceilings popular at the turn of the century (before last). I've had to repair a few of those in some historical buildings, and nothing in my kit bag would touch those seams until I fabricated a very wide tip for MAPP gas to sweat them.

    I'd definitely be interested in seeing/hearing what anyone comes up with on the use of that puppy.

    Any old-time plumbers to speak up?


    Joe

    Leave a comment:


  • dabar39
    replied
    Then again, whats the worst that can happen by experimenting with a pint of alcohol.


    The next statement after that is usually "It only hurt 'til I passed out". Dave

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  • KBar
    replied
    Behind the hexagon cap on the top are some small pin holes like you would find on a torch tip. In the larger spout is some kind of wick. The wing type knobs on the side just turn like it is some kind of adjustment. It is about 7" tall. If I can find out how it is supposed to be used, I'll take some pictures for everybody.

    Then again, whats the worst that can happen by experimenting with a pint of alcohol.

    Leave a comment:


  • dabar39
    replied
    I've seen these before hanging on the walls as decoration, never seen them in use though. I would suspect SundownIII is correct in his assessment of the use for solder and not for any kind of welding. I too would like to know more about them and their actual usage, maybe even an actual demonstration. Dave

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