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a grinder is a grinder, right???

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  • tacmig
    replied
    It's Hilti

    I'm new to posting but not new to this MB. Been coming here for a long time! In any event I think everyone has an idea of what works best for them and what does not. I have been melting steel for years and have gone the distance with just about every tool mentioned here. For me, when I decided to give up the buck and try Hilti (MADE BY HILTI I've been to the plant in Lichtenstein and Düsseldorf) my hand tool problems just went away. I think if a contest were to be held on who can or who has abused their tools with great vigor, I would shine on top. I usually don't spend this much time writing about what I consider "little things" but for all that Hilti has done for me, they deserve recognition as being the finest power tools you can get your hands on. Yes they are expensive, but for me I can't afford not to have the best.

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  • welder_one
    replied
    Originally posted by cajuncat View Post
    ...But one thing that I have learned is that people want a 4 1/2" grinder to do the job that a 9" grinder should be performing.I understand that not every body has a big grinder but be realalistic in what you are asking from your grinder.The right tool for the job always pays off.
    most of the time a 9 inch grinder wont fit, if i could fit a 9 incher, believe me i would use one. faster removal, less heat, and less time changing stones or wheels.

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  • SignWave
    replied
    It truly is unfortunate that we now live in what is becoming more and more of a disposable world. I'm quite sure it all boils down to dollars. If something is made to break down, another can be sold in order to maximize profit. Sigh.
    Im glad my Hilti (not made by said company) is standing the test of time and abuse.

    Someone once said to me: " a poor man cannot afford to buy poor quality"
    I think I tend to agree impoverished or not.

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  • weldress
    replied
    grinders

    I have many occasions to remove parts from the aforementioned Muskox in order to do details on the bench and then replace them on the sculpture...such as the underside of the horns.
    This is like building a car...hard to get underneath and impossible to lift.
    I use the Dewalt grinder to cut and fit.
    Having used several other brands including Makita, I keep a B+D in reserve but I call them 'disposable grinders' so I don't feel so mad when it quits.
    A nine inch would torque me across the shop.
    More photos soon of the Muskox...summer slowed me down.
    Hope you are all working hard and liking it.
    Weldress

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  • fun4now
    replied
    i really like my porta cable grinders. they have held up the best and for the longest.
    i think cajuncat makes an excellent point about keeping in mind its a 4.5" grinder and not to expect it to do the job of a 9" one. i only have 4.5" grinders and at times think i should have a bigger one but make due with the 4.5" i have.
    twisted wire cup brushes seem to rattle the crap out of a grinder and have been the downfall of many of my little B&D grinders. i have them on my porta cables now with better results but can tell its a tuff job for any grinder.

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  • cajuncat
    replied
    I have the Dewalt and the Milwaukee 4 1/2" grinders and both are fine grinders.My choice would be the Dewalt for comfort and performance though.But one thing that I have learned is that people want a 4 1/2" grinder to do the job that a 9" grinder should be performing.I understand that not every body has a big grinder but be realalistic in what you are asking from your grinder.The right tool for the job always pays off.

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  • calweld
    replied
    I feel somewhat qualified to comment on this subject. Pic shows a three or four year accumulation . . . note plenty of B&D's, Dewalts, Milwaulkee's . . . Just a couple years ago, I threw at least this many, probably more, into my dumpster . . .

    Only brand I personally have found that holds up, in the 4 1/2" to 5" range, has been Bosch . . .
    Attached Files

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  • DDA52
    replied
    FWIW, HILTI doesn't make their grinders. They were made by Metabo for the longest time and may still be. AEG has made some of their stuff as well. German engineering at its best.

    I have a 5" Metabo that is still as strong as the day I got it....in '89. I also have several DeWalts. They do the bulk of my work and have held up very well. I have had no troubles with them... and no, I am not going easy on them either.
    Last edited by DDA52; 09-02-2007, 09:56 AM.

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  • SignWave
    replied
    Im with TACMIG

    Hilti RULES!!!!
    Ive had the same Hilti 4 1/2' for twenty years. Ive beat on it, dropped it clogged it with concrete dust, blown all the dust out, filled it up again and again.... I think ive made at least fifty pounds of metal dust with it... another fifty of aluminum dust too and it just keeps going.. TWENTY YEARS!!! and im the second owner. it came off a construction site were it was used to smooth out concrete walls.... so yeah.. HILTI is the way to go.. now tha ti may have jinxed myself... I need to go find some wood... hmm wood what does that stuff look like? anyone know..? I cant remember!

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  • samc
    replied
    metabo

    we use metabo grinders they are by far the best . used makita an dewalt dont like them as much . and they dont seem to last . nearly all of our tools are metabo, grinders , drills , saws..

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  • alha
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve View Post
    We burn up a few 4 1/2 grinders a year. It depends a lot on the user. You just can't load em up and expect them to last. Let the grinding wheel do the job seems works the best. For a lot of AL work an investment in an air angle grinder will do best. With an auto oiler they outlast the electrics. The AL shavings get into the electrics motor and there you go. Paddle switch is best as the top switch ones tend to lock in on when you don't want it to.
    Steve, quick question. I haven't yet welded AL yet, but have been trying to read up and learn as much as I can from this forum, and one thing that I have gotten loud and clear is that when welding AL, it has to be clean enough to eat off of. I noticed you mentioned that you use an auto oiler, wouldn't there be an issue with contaminating the joint, or do you only use this in the early stages of prep work, where you have to go over it with other things before the weld? Sorry if it seems like a basic question, just trying to understand. I do get the shavings in the electric motor part, so the air idea itself makes sense, just wondering about contamination.

    Thanks!

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  • M-Tech
    replied
    Economics Degree

    Unfortunately, we can't just buy a tool by name, in most cases . . . we have to study Economics, and keep track of which corporate giant now owns our favorite tool company.

    As was pointed out in an earlier reply, DeWalt was bought by Black and Decker -- at which point the bean counters took control of quality control. My DeWalt tools all pre-date that corporate takeover (early-1990's), and are all working well, and used on an almost daily basis. Likewise my Metalbo (circa 1988) grinder, and my Bosch (circa 1990). My Milwaukee grinders (paddle switch) have held up well, but run on the heavy side.

    My Metalbo came from a trade with a mason who liked the pretty yellow of a new DeWalt I had. A little shop air to blow the dust out, and it has performed flawlessly for me for over fourteen years. Some day I'll sandblast the case and repaint it--it deserves a place of honor.

    There's no question about this: you can't beat using quality tools.

    Joe

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  • littlefuzz
    replied
    I was having a problem with burning up the dewalts (the reg and the HD ones). Seems like every few weeks I'd burn one up. I got a small Hitachi that lasted over a year (the bigger hitachi didn't last long). It had a good design with the thumb switch on top toward the head of the grinder. Now they've swapped to Bosch, they work good but I don't like the paddle switch since I grind one handed a lot and have a problem with my hands going numb.

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  • Steve
    replied
    We burn up a few 4 1/2 grinders a year. It depends a lot on the user. You just can't load em up and expect them to last. Let the grinding wheel do the job seems works the best. For a lot of AL work an investment in an air angle grinder will do best. With an auto oiler they outlast the electrics. The AL shavings get into the electrics motor and there you go. Paddle switch is best as the top switch ones tend to lock in on when you don't want it to.

    Leave a comment:


  • PLUMMER
    replied
    One thing that has consistently poped up in alot of forums or search engines, when looking at the best durable grinder. Metabo has clearly been recomended more by far. I would say if I counted it was said to be the best more times than all the others combined. There were also more acient metabo pictures than any other still in operation. Professionals and everyday users in shops mostly recomended Metabo. Dewalt was second for recomendations, but I noticed it was used in the penny pincher shops and the yellow color seems to be more of a fad that sells than the units performance itself ,for reason to buy. Never seen an old dewalt still in operation, not that there isn't but most said it was cheaper to replace than repair. With all this said I still went with bosch myself, since I use only occasionaly and the warranty seemed much better. I like the rest of my bosch tools asawell.

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