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My First Attempt At A Cattle Guard Bypass Gate

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  • Harvuskong
    replied
    Condensation does occur, gentlemen, I do suggest small drain or weep holes in the bottom to prevent rust out and/or freeze split spots.

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  • Jim-TX
    replied
    Yes, I'm talking about the end of the gate by the cattle guard. After seeing your metal bender thread, I will be asking you for advice on projects. That's great work.

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  • MTBob
    replied
    Originally posted by Jim-TX View Post
    I looked at your pictures again and I think that it would be pretty easy to just weld a piece of square tubing to the gate that's big enough to shed water over the pieces of tubing that go down to the angle iron. Think of it like you would shingles on a roof or a skirt. Let the tubing overlap the lower tubing so that water won't run into it.
    Ah, I think I get it. It sounds like you are talking about the vertical support piece that holds the end of the panels to the cattle guard, right? If I understand your comment, you are concerned about water getting into the space between the vertical support tube & tube extension. Makes sense. Rather than a skirt over the connection to stop water from getting in, how about simply drilling a hole in the lower tubular section that is welded to the angle iron and making sure the water can get out? Hum, on second thought, the drain hole could get plugged up. I know this can happen because last summer I cleaned out an incredible nest of bee larva from the water discharge port on my Merc outboard. The darn things made a mud based nest and really plugged it up. // Bob

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  • Jim-TX
    replied
    Bob, thanks for taking my post as intended. I wouldn't worry too much about the gate frame. It's probably welded good and painted so that it won't get water inside.

    I looked at your pictures again and I think that it would be pretty easy to just weld a piece of square tubing to the gate that's big enough to shed water over the pieces of tubing that go down to the angle iron. Think of it like you would shingles on a roof or a skirt. Let the tubing overlap the lower tubing so that water won't run into it.

    I can tell that you are a lot like me and strive for the best that you can do and I hope that my ideas can help.

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  • MTBob
    replied
    Originally posted by Jim-TX View Post
    Nice work Bob. Don't take this as nitpicking, but I noticed the square tubing that supports the gate on the cattle guard looks like it would catch water. If so, you might want to fix it so that it doesn't, otherwise it might rust and not come apart like you designed it to do. Water getting inside of tubing or pipe is never good. Again, don't take this as a criticism. I'm just offering a suggestion.
    You know, that is a really good point, thanks for bringing it up. I struggled with this issue both on the tubular gate frame and the support members. I need to go back and take another look at whether I've got weep holes in the bottom of the tubing assemblies.
    For outside applications should all welded tubular assemblies have a drain hole, crack or other water exit? I'm pretty sure that the gate frame is tight... but, you never know there could be a pin hole leak that allows water to pool.
    Thanks for the tip.

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  • Jim-TX
    replied
    Nice work Bob. Don't take this as nitpicking, but I noticed the square tubing that supports the gate on the cattle guard looks like it would catch water. If so, you might want to fix it so that it doesn't, otherwise it might rust and not come apart like you designed it to do. Water getting inside of tubing or pipe is never good. Again, don't take this as a criticism. I'm just offering a suggestion.

    Leave a comment:


  • 67chevelle
    replied
    Very nice looking gate MTBob, You may have problems with the cows stopping to admire the ornamental accents .

    Mark

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  • MTBob
    replied
    I know the wire gate "design" well - barb wire, a couple of old posts and a jockey stick. I've still got the **** things behind the barn & plenty of scars to boot.

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  • monte55
    replied
    Looks to me like you're setting a trap for the cattle to trip and sprain their ankles. That's just mean! If they get through, do they get some grain?
    Nice looking entry.

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  • Old Sporty
    replied
    That is one fine bypass gate. The ones I grew up around consisted of a few strands of barbwire and some old fence posts hacked together. Don't let the King Ranch see this or that's all you'll be making for a long time.

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  • MTBob
    started a topic My First Attempt At A Cattle Guard Bypass Gate

    My First Attempt At A Cattle Guard Bypass Gate

    We live in cattle country. The unwritten law is that it's up to the landowner to fence animals out, not (necessarily) the animal owner's responsibility to fence them in (this western rule is not too easily understood or accepted, and that's another story). So, we decided to put in a bypass cattle guard in our entry road. The bypass is critical if you want to move livestock or around the cattle guard. My design criteria were:
    - have a swing gate that is wide enough for two horses or a car to bypass the cattle guard without touching it
    - be able to easily remove the side gates for repair maintenance or in the event of extra wide loads
    - allow adjustment for the gate height
    - allow adjustment for the gate swing angle
    - provide a quick working fool proof gate latch
    - firmly tie to the cattle guard without permanent welds
    - be decorative, but not gaudy
    - provide a flexible and strong connection from the gate posts to the adjoining side fences

    Here's the results:
    Attached Files
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