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  • Archaic
    replied
    Another noob tig welder here.

    I have a new Syncrowave 200 and like others on this thread have been doing a LOT of research. Transformer. Inverter. Square wave. Advanced square wave. And apparently those are two completely different animals. My tig welding with the 200 thus far has been confined to mild steel and stainless as I try to move out of the "mud dauber" phase. I must say that my first beads left a lot to be desired, and I must hold the record for sticking the tungsten in the puddle.

    Where this thread is concerned, and my question. My research would seem to indicate that transformer machines (Syncrowave) are confined to using pure tungsten, balled, for aluminum. Inverters (Dynasty) - 1.5% lanthanated with a truncated point. BUT, I keep coming across threads or suggestions in some of the literature that would indicate using 1.5% lanthanated with a truncated point on aluminum with transformer machines. So, is anyone with a Syncrowave using pointed lanthanated on aluminum, or am I confined to pure tungsten balled when I get to aluminum? At the rate that I am progressing on mild steel, that will be awhile.

    Leave a comment:


  • mwccwi
    replied
    Originally posted by IRONWORKER View Post
    AND THAT IS TRUE WHAT DO YOU DO ASK FOR HELP OR READ ALL THAT LITERATURE AND FORGET WHAT YOU READ

    THIS IS COOL I LEARNED SOMTHING FROM HERE " WELD ON "
    The more you know on a subject the more you'll remember each time you touch that subject, allthough you think you forgot, the human mind is a complex thing and long term memory is just that -Long term. Read, talk, ask, watch, and try- don't rule out any learning tool, someday someone will introduce something to you and suddenly you'll remember what you had forgotten or as you learn each time you retouch a particular subject stuff from the past does play in (maybe you didn't fully someting understand the first time, but later as you grow and learn old stuff starts to make since and fall into place.
    Reading is good and the internet is a wonderfull tool for free reference material, Check it out we found "here" on the net and we read.
    Last edited by mwccwi; 07-20-2007, 12:39 PM. Reason: spelling more spelling

    Leave a comment:


  • Bert
    replied
    gumpy42....WHOOOAAA BOY!!! CALM DOWN!!!
    lmao....good you screamed, made me happy I didn't start tigging with my D200 yet Anyway, i would have read the manual and read the GTAW handbook before I started...Darn good advice for me
    Keep it coming....
    School has all Sync 350 transformer machines.....

    Leave a comment:


  • AC MOTORSPORTS
    replied
    Thanks For The Help

    Originally posted by grumpy42 View Post
    Green tungsten (pure tungsten) is not recommended for the Dynasty (or for inverters in general). I know that some people say that it is okay, but all of the literature specifically says not to use pure tungsten.

    I started out using 2% ceriated (orange band) which worked great for mild steel, but would ball up quickly when doing aluminum. Lanthinated tungsten seems to keep its point better when working with AC (1.5% lanth. - yellow band, 2% lanth. - blue band).
    I HAVE NOT USED ORANGE OR YELLOW BUT WE HAD SOME BLUE IN OUR SHOP BUT WE WERE WELDING ON STANLESS THANKS FOR THE HELP

    I WILL BE GOING TO ORDER THE RAINBOW OF TUNGSTEN SO I CAN SEE FIRST HAND IF THERE IS A BETTER TUNGSTEN THAN WHAT WE USE NOW

    AND THAT IS TRUE WHAT DO YOU DO ASK FOR HELP OR READ ALL THAT LITERATURE AND FORGET WHAT YOU READ

    THIS IS COOL I LEARNED SOMTHING FROM HERE " WELD ON "

    Leave a comment:


  • SundownIII
    replied
    Grumpy,

    Thanks for making things easier.

    Like you, I get very frustrated reading all the "bad advice" given on the board.

    Going back to one of my favorite expressions, "Better to remain silent and be thought the fool than open one's mouth and remove all doubt".

    This board can be a source of great information and I have learned a lot here. I have also seen a lot of bad information spouted as gospel.

    Leave a comment:


  • grumpy42
    replied
    Here are direct links for the documents that Sundown mentioned

    Miller GTAW Handbook (one PDF instead of multiple PDFs from the miller site)
    http://mookins.com/TIG%20Handbook.pdf

    The Proper Selection & Preparation of Tungsten Electrodes for Arc Welding
    http://www.diamondground.com/Guidebook0105.pdf

    I think that it would be prudent for the administrator of these Miller forums to have a "sticky" post with a title something like "Important Dynasty/Inverter tig information". This post would contain basic information about the proper tungsten type and preparation for use with the Dynasty. It seems that everytime a new user posts a question about the Dynasty invariabley someone post a reply about balling the tungsten or using pure tungsten.

    Just a though from a guy who probably shouldn't be giving advice...

    Leave a comment:


  • SundownIII
    replied
    Reference Help for Everyone,

    I read all the "recommendations" about tungsten selection/preparation and just sit back and shake my head. There's as much "bad advice" put out as there is "good advice". How's a newbie to tell the difference?

    I would suggest that anyone trying to learn to tig weld go to Diamond Ground Products website (www.diamondground.com) and download their "The Proper Selection & Preparation of Tungsten Electrodes for Arc Welding". Their guide is much more informative than much of the "internet hearsay".

    Additionally, I would recommend that anyone new to tig welding, acquire a copy (download or purchase) of Miller's Tig Handbook for GTAW. It's a very good guide, much more accurate than some of the "expert posters".

    Just my .02

    Leave a comment:


  • grumpy42
    replied
    Originally posted by IRONWORKER View Post
    I Have Tryed Tungsten Out In The Feld And At Work And Home There Is A Big Differents On All Of Them Do To The Power Sorce And For Aluminum On A Inverter The Green Tungsten Works Good
    Green tungsten (pure tungsten) is not recommended for the Dynasty (or for inverters in general). I know that some people say that it is okay, but all of the literature specifically says not to use pure tungsten.

    I started out using 2% ceriated (orange band) which worked great for mild steel, but would ball up quickly when doing aluminum. Lanthinated tungsten seems to keep its point better when working with AC (1.5% lanth. - yellow band, 2% lanth. - blue band).

    Leave a comment:


  • MAC702
    replied
    Originally posted by djbtech View Post
    Aluminum...let me suggest you get your tungsten ready to go first:

    Switch your rig to DC positive, keep the amps down, and the tip will form a ball. It may take a couple tries to get it neat. Flip back to AC and weld away.
    Did you notice what machine he has? Your advice is not recommended for his equipment.

    Leave a comment:


  • AC MOTORSPORTS
    replied
    Tig Is A Lot Of Patience

    I Have A Synchrowave 250 With A Water Cooler With A 300 Linde Torch On It "that Is My Home Welder"

    I Work At A Ornemental Iron Shop Out In The Feld

    In That Shop We Use Miller Synchowave 350

    Out In The Feld We Have A Lincoln I75; 110 Volt And 240 Volt I Used It To Weld Aluminum And It Was Alot Harder To Weld With But I Got Better At It

    The Inverter Is A Lot Harder At Start Up But When You Get The Start Up Set That Is The Hard Thing Welding Is Just Welding

    Try Stanless And Weld On That That Will Get You Good Heat Control And Use The Hf On All The Time Get Use To That And Then When You Go To Ac The Hf Will Be Easier For You

    When You Weld On Aluminum You Need To Clean It Realy Good And A Good Fit Up Is Very Important

    I Have Tryed Tungsten Out In The Feld And At Work And Home There Is A Big Differents On All Of Them Do To The Power Sorce And For Aluminum On A Inverter The Green Tungsten Works Good

    The One Thing I Have Done And It Was Hard To Think It Worked And That Is To Weld Aluminum Dc Positive We Did That On 3/16 About 6 Inch Long About 1/4 Fillet

    There Is A Lot Of Guys On Here That Can Tell You What To Do And We Have The Storys But You Got To Do The Welding

    Good Luck You Can Do It I Did It With A Linclon Welder

    Leave a comment:


  • grumpy42
    replied
    Originally posted by djbtech View Post
    Aluminum...let me suggest you get your tungsten ready to go first:

    Switch your rig to DC positive, keep the amps down, and the tip will form a ball. It may take a couple tries to get it neat. Flip back to AC and weld away.
    DO NOT BALL THE TUNGSTEN! I don't mean to shout, but even though I am just a beginner myself, I have done considerable research and reading and balled tungsten in not appropriate for inverter machines (e.g. Dynasty 200). In fact, as I understand it, it is actually possible to damage an inverter based machine by trying to ball the tungsten. I do not even think you will be able to start an arc with balled tungsten as it disperses the energy over a greater surface area.

    Prepare the tungsten as it suggests in the manual - Grind to a point and grind a small flat spot at the tip. The manual does show a picture of balled tungsten (but not how to prepare balled tungsten), however, I believe that the picture is there either erroneously or for comparison. DON'T BALL THE TUNGSTEN!

    Originally posted by Bert View Post
    With the 200 inverter, you're telling me the tip will stay sharp while you tig?
    Depending on the balance and the type of tungsten, it will ball up over time. I was using 2% ceriated and found that it would ball up quite quickly. Eventially, it would ball up to a point that I could no longer start an arc and I would have to regrind it. Even when it got to that point, the tip looked like a dull pencil (not completely round like tungsten that is used for transformer based machines). Lanthinated tungsten holds its tip much better than the ceriated tungsten
    Last edited by grumpy42; 07-16-2007, 12:13 AM.

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  • Bert
    replied
    He has a Dynasty 200, Inverter, doesn't need to ball up the tip.
    Hank
    Really? I haven't used my Dynasty 200 yet, Tig was all on schools Synchrowave 350. We set it to ac, put the torch about 1/4" away from a piece of scrap aluminum and pressed down on the pedal to get the ball first. If you don't and keep the tip sharp, when you start tigging aluminum, it's going to ball up anyway. With the 200 inverter, you're telling me the tip will stay sharp while you tig?

    Leave a comment:


  • Hankl
    replied
    Originally posted by djbtech View Post
    Aluminum...let me suggest you get your tungsten ready to go first:

    Switch your rig to DC positive, keep the amps down, and the tip will form a ball. It may take a couple tries to get it neat. Flip back to AC and weld away.

    He has a Dynasty 200, Inverter, doesn't need to ball up the tip.

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • djbtech
    replied
    Practice making beads in aluminum flat stock, no filler. Dwell at the start until the pool forms, then move and lower amps briefly while pausing. With filler, it just takes time to find what works for you, but if it's consistently too hot, back off your amps 25-33% each pause/dab you do. Have fun.

    Leave a comment:


  • djbtech
    replied
    Aluminum...let me suggest you get your tungsten ready to go first:

    Switch your rig to DC positive, keep the amps down, and the tip will form a ball. It may take a couple tries to get it neat. Flip back to AC and weld away.

    Leave a comment:

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