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  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    started a topic Plasma screen stands

    Plasma screen stands

    I've been procrastinating long enough and need to knock out eight freestanding supports for some plasma screens to go in some corporate place somewhere.

    Short story is they get a 3/8" thick x 32" diameter steel base, which also gets a 5" x 1/8" skirt. Two 3" OD tubes rise up about 60" and a 1/8" plate gets welded between them to which the factory bracket mounts, and then the screens will hang from that.

    Here's the start:

    1) Eight bases, the template, and the drop. Heavy metal.
    2) Eight mounting plates waiting to bridge the gap.
    3) The bases get bolted to the ground, but they still need to be levelled, so I'm making three adjustable pads for each base, which will get welded to the underside of the disks and be concealed by the skirt. Parts is parts.
    4) My super fancy jig.
    5) Zing-bang.

    Thanks for looking.
    Attached Files

  • Old Sporty
    replied
    Chris - Great job. Looks factory made. BTW - any idea what one weighs? Your work has given me some ideas for a museum display.

    Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    Glad it's over

    Making these things was an OK job, but I'm really glad they're out of my chop and I can move on to something with some more style.

    Next up is a stainless and teak gate, a glass windscreen, and a corten privacy screen. This one will be all my own design, so I get call it how I see it.

    Gotta eat.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Craig in Denver
    replied
    Originally posted by SinGear View Post
    Job look good man, the kicker being we all seem to think of a better way to do things after we've done them.
    It's how man has improved on everything he's ever built. It's ended up with the International Space Station and rovers on Mars. Is that cool or what??

    Chris:
    Thanks for sharing your agitation with your 'misconceptions'. I'm just a hobby guy, if I need a widget, I build it. First I 'engineer the cwap out of it'. Then, when I step back to look at the finished project; I wonder what the h*ll I was thinking. Everything in my world is a protype; room for improvement. But I only needed ONE.

    It's nice to know, that even the 'shop guys', aren't perfect in 'their own eyes'.

    Thanks for the pics, triggers the imagination.

    Craig

    Leave a comment:


  • SinGear
    replied
    Oh I hear ya on that one, I'm an Millwork engineer by trade and we deal with that BS all the time.

    Let me tell you what you need then you can suggest what you want

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    Originally posted by SinGear View Post
    Fire your designer for that one though for the simple fact that I think he should have had you make the skirt about an 1" shy of the ground, so the end user could adjust the levelers as it sits. But then again it could be perspective.
    That's just the beginning with "designers." I'm tired of fighting the fight, so I just let them work it out. They always want things to "float" with no visible hardware. Magic. The installers will have a blast with this one. This is one of the reasons I don't do installations much anymore.

    It gets real fun when they all want things to be on locking casters, but they don't want the castors to be visible (e.g. accessible).

    Thanks for looking.
    Last edited by chrisgay@sbcglo; 09-17-2008, 10:09 AM. Reason: clarity

    Leave a comment:


  • SinGear
    replied
    Job look good man, the kicker being we all seem to think of a better way to do things after we've done them.

    Fire your designer for that one though for the simple fact that I think he should have had you make the skirt about an 1" shy of the ground, so the end user could adjust the levelers as it sits. But then again it could be perspective.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    I wasn't talking about the vertical seams, I was wondering about the horizontal one where the plate meets the "skirt."

    I did a wheel replacement stand for a guys show car where I made the mistake of cutting and welding a piece of flat stock rather than just getting a piece of plate and cutting it out as one unit. The time it took to hide the seam was more than it would've cost for the plate over the bar stock. He ended up mudding that to blend where the weld was (surface texture was off between the HRS and where I ground it), so I was wondering if your final presentation would also have that seam eliminated. That's all...

    He ordered up another one for a buddy and I already have the plate for that one. Live and learn.

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    That's what I keep telling myself.

    I wish I would have done the rings in one piece so the seam would have been in the back. I buffed them out pretty darn well, but... well, you know.

    I gotta let it go, though, and move on. They're going in a HUGE room and there will be these HUGE screens on them, so nobody will be looking at the bases anyways. As you know, when something's in your shop, you put it under the microscope.

    Thanks for the replies.

    The next jobs will be a bit more creative. Looks like some stainless, teak, and glass.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    Or you're more than 10' away.

    I was just curious. There's nothing wrong with leaving the edge there.

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    Originally posted by Fishy Jim View Post
    Are the seams at the edge of the plate/rings going to be left visible, or will those be filled by the painter?
    The skirt was tucked under the edge of the plate by 3/16", so the seam won't be visible unless you're less than 5" tall.

    Glad it's done.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    I think they turned out pretty good.

    Are the seams at the edge of the plate/rings going to be left visible, or will those be filled by the painter?

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    For Broccoli

    Originally posted by chris***@sbcglo View Post
    Don't bother. I'll post them myself.
    ...sometimes the bear eats you.

    1, 2, 3) One piece ring. Ahhhh, geeeeez.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by chrisgay@sbcglo; 09-17-2008, 02:48 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    1) Stacked up. There were eight of these in total.

    2) I TIG welded the seams of the skirt and buffed them out. I can control the fill better with a TIG weld so there's less post-weld grinding on a joint like this. I just welded these up as they sat stacked on the cart in the previous pictures. Not the prettiest welds, but I was cruizin' for speed and gettin' er done.

    3) Mounting plate welded across the tubes. This will receive another bracket from which the monitor will hang.

    All in all, this project came out pretty well. It wasn't my design, but I was happy to oblige. I'll try to get some pictures as they sit painted and installed once the building is finished. I'm just glad they're gone and I can move on to the next project.

    Thnaks for looking.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    more pics, finally

    Hello everyone.
    I've been real busy, so I'm finally getting around to posting some more pictures (if anyone really cares).

    1 and 2) Jigged up for welding the vertical tubes. The tubes are 3" x .120 wall. I had the 3/8" plate waterjet for a press fit so I could do the welds on the underside. I used this table to jig it all up square.

    3) This is how the underside of the stands looks. Basically this is what I see before I weld the tubes. No one will see any of this, except some bugs or really small people.

    4) Welded. All of these welds were done as jigged up, so it was good practice for OOP stuff. Although, it seems that most of my work is OOP.

    5) Zipped up. I needed full 60" lengths which I got from 20' pieces. The ends of each 20 footer were creased as you can see in the photograph. I put it towards the backside and the pictures shows it to be much worse than it is in real time. No big deal.

    Thanks for looking.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:

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