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  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    Originally posted by MMW View Post
    If your shear is rolling the edge then the blades are not sharpened or not adjusted correctly. There should be no rolled edge on a sheared plate.
    I should clarify. The blades make a clean cut. I wrote that it rolled the edge, which is misleading. The cut is clean, but the plate distorts/curls over the 5" width. This hand shear has a 4" blade, so I have to take the cut in two bites.

    Every shear I've ever used distorts the metal to some degree. Every piece of metal I've had sheared by someone else has been distorted to some degree. This applies to manual, electric, hydraulic, whatever. Every piece of paper I've cut with a pair of scissors has a curl to it.

    When I need to cut something with no distortion, I use a saw... or a water jet.

    On a similar note, I use a drill press (or water jet) to cut holes rather than a punch, which distorts the metal.

    Thanks for looking.
    Last edited by chrisgay@sbcglo; 09-05-2008, 01:45 PM. Reason: clarity

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  • MMW
    replied
    If your shear is rolling the edge then the blades are not sharpened or not adjusted correctly. There should be no rolled edge on a sheared plate.

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  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    base

    Picture of the base. There will be eight of these.
    Attached Files

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  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    progress

    Here are some progress pictures.

    The skirt/rings are rolled from 1/8" x 5" material. I have to roll them in two halves. Therefore, the halves must be left long, then trimmed to size to fit the base.

    Question: How do you trim the flats off of the rolled halves?
    Answer: I have a shop full of bandsaws, but I'm using a vintage hand shear I picked up for $80.

    The shear rolls the ends a bit (as shears do), so we have to flatten them out with an expensive flattening machine.

    1) Rolled halves. These were rolled on my home-made roller (see other post).

    2) Jigged.

    3) Fancy, expensive cutting tool.

    4) Expensive, complicated flattening machine

    5) Detail of underside.

    Thanks for looking.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by chrisgay@sbcglo; 09-05-2008, 02:04 AM.

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  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    Originally posted by mulugod View Post
    That stuff looks great! I only wish I had the refined tecnique you show here!
    I have a Dyn200dx and I love it! I assume that is what you accomplised these weld with!?
    Again,,,good work!!
    MB
    Thanks for the kind words.

    Actually, I used my Passport to weld up those adjustable feet. Quick and easy.

    It's all in the planning, really. Not much to the welding. You'd be surprised.

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  • mulugod
    replied
    Hey Nice work!!

    That stuff looks great! I only wish I had the refined tecnique you show here!
    I have a Dyn200dx and I love it! I assume that is what you accomplised these weld with!?
    Again,,,good work!!
    MB

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  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    Originally posted by NAS-NAS View Post
    What does the finished product look like?
    I don't know yet... . Check back in a couple of weeks.

    Once completed, they will get an automotive paint finish.

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  • NAS-NAS
    replied
    What does the finished product look like?

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  • c wagner
    replied
    Sweet!

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