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  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    started a topic Tables: stainless and teak

    Tables: stainless and teak

    And yet another project.

    The following pictures tell the short story of four custom tables we knocked out for a residence a couple of years ago. My how time flies when you're having fun.

    The customer saw something I had previously designed and built, so we just adapted the design to suit their needs.

    1. Start with a circle... cut from 3/8" 304 stainless... and find its center. Simple enough.
    2. Layout for the top frame, which has already been drilled, countersunk at this point in the game.
    3. Zip it up, dawg.
    4. These butt joints were done autogenously (sp.?) since they have to nestle into a specific locale... no grinding necessary for a good fit. Plenty strong for the application.
    5. ...And the fit. Yes, that's the underside.
    Attached Files

  • fendermender
    replied
    Solar Flux

    Originally posted by chris***@sbcglo View Post
    Fendermender, that sounds like a cool project.
    If you think you might have some issues with burn through and/or you are concerned with the backside of the welds, I recommend that you try Solar Flux paste. This would probably be an easier alternative than back-purging for your application.
    Given my understanding of your application, however, I probably wouldn't sweat it and just zip 'er up; but I'm not fully aware of your criteria.

    Good luck... and post pics. I'm sure there's a bunch of us who would love to see pics of a stainless steel covert/housing for a grape crusher/destemmer.
    Thanks.
    I ordered a can of "Solar Flux" today from the local Praxair and bought a small bottle of the Methanol to mix with it.

    Anxious to give it a try.
    Randall

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    Solar flux paste

    Fendermender, that sounds like a cool project.
    If you think you might have some issues with burn through and/or you are concerned with the backside of the welds, I recommend that you try Solar Flux paste. This would probably be an easier alternative than back-purging for your application.
    Given my understanding of your application, however, I probably wouldn't sweat it and just zip 'er up; but I'm not fully aware of your criteria.

    Good luck... and post pics. I'm sure there's a bunch of us who would love to see pics of a stainless steel covert/housing for a grape crusher/destemmer.

    Leave a comment:


  • fendermender
    replied
    O.K.
    I understand.
    I need to build a S.S. shroud for a motorized machine so I will keep that in mind.
    It is a grape crusher destemmer.
    It was hand crank but I put a motor on it and I think it needs a shroud around the belt pullies and sprocket and chains.

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    Holy @#$*!

    Originally posted by fendermender View Post
    I was wondering how you back gassed the upright to the base?

    I am very new to this.
    Thanks in advance.
    I didn't. It's a table, not a spaceship.


    Hey Fendermender, not to be curt, but I wasn't worried about any carbon precipitation on the inside of my table base. Wear the shoe that fits, right?

    Had I felt it necessary, I would have probably drilled a hole on one of the ends (probably through the flatbar on the top) and back-gassed accordingly.

    Thanks for looking.

    Leave a comment:


  • fendermender
    replied
    I was wondering how you back gassed the upright to the base?

    I am very new to this.
    Thanks in advance.

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    Sd

    Originally posted by lanceman73 View Post
    Isn't working with sainless so nice? Very nice work. Does teak warp with water? I only now that they use it on boats and quess that.

    Thanks,
    Lance
    Thanks Lance. Stainless is nice. So is teak. Any wood will warp with water/sunlight/climate. The key is in the design/geometry/assembly of whatever you're building. However, teak is very resistant to the elements and is dimensionally pretty darn stable for a wood. I don't d*ck around with other woods for anything that will live out of doors. Going full circle, that's why it is used on boats. Thanks for looking.
    If you're ever downtown, swing by the Hilton Gaslamp on 4th and K. We did the steel/stainless teak gates. They have been living down by the water since 2000, with nothing more than an occasional swipe of oil.

    Leave a comment:


  • lanceman73
    replied
    Your Tables

    Isn't working with sainless so nice? Very nice work. Does teak warp with water? I only now that they use it on boats and quess that.

    Thanks,
    Lance

    Leave a comment:


  • fun4now
    replied
    looking good. thanks for sharing the pic's with us.

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    SundownIII, I'll have to try out the resorcinol. Clean-up with water gets a thumbs up from me. I'm getting tired of using so many different chemicals.

    I don't do much woodwork anymore, really. Just sort of integrate the wood as an accent most of the time. I started out doing more woodwork and have all the equipment, but there seemed to be more of a calling for the metal at the time. I do enjoy working with wood and would like to do more personal projects out of wood. I love old woodworking equipment, have amassed quite a collection of it, and end up making my living with a 35 pound welder. Go figure.

    I haven't done any boat interiors yet, but it seems like a good market. I have been helping a friend out with the welding on his boat restoration project, and he keeps pushing me to get into boat interiors... so... we'll see.

    I'd love to see some pics of some of your stuff.

    Thanks again.

    Leave a comment:


  • SundownIII
    replied
    Chris,

    Appreciate the info.

    I do quite a bit of stainless and teak work also. If you ever have a project that is to be continuously or regularly submerged you may try the resorcinol (two part glue) and cleans up with water. I've actually had better luck with it on such things as boat swim platforms than I have had with West System (Epoxy).

    Again, really nice work. Ever done any yacht interiors?

    Keep up the great work. Really good to see a professional's product. (Kinda get tired of seeing mig carts, if you know what I mean).

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    Originally posted by SundownIII View Post
    Chris,

    Really nice work. Not just the tables but the whole portfolio.

    Did you use epoxy or resorcinol for glueing up the teak?

    Those tables set the customer back a pretty penny. The last 8/4 teak I bought (2 weeks ago) ran me $26/bd ft.

    You're fortunate to have such high end clients. Always fun to work with good materials.
    Thanks SundownIII. I've been at it a while and am lucky to get to work on some cool things.

    I did not glue up those teak boards on these table. Instead we just gapped them (about 1/8") and screwed them from the underside. These were for outdoor use and I find that this method for an outdoor table/fence/seat leads to less problems/warping/splitting and lets the water run through.

    I have used epoxy, polyurethane (Gorilla brand works OK), and even yellow glue on teak for other applications. I have had success with all three... they key as you know is in proper fitup and cleanliness; I swipe it with Acetone prior to glue-up. Gee, this sounds a lot like welding prep.

    Oh man, the cost of materials these days is brutal. Yes, teak is a small fortune and I always have to check the cost of wood and metal as they fluctuate so much (always up, of course). Thanks for looking.

    Leave a comment:


  • SundownIII
    replied
    Chris,

    Really nice work. Not just the tables but the whole portfolio.

    Did you use epoxy or resorcinol for glueing up the teak?

    Those tables set the customer back a pretty penny. The last 8/4 teak I bought (2 weeks ago) ran me $26/bd ft.

    You're fortunate to have such high end clients. Always fun to work with good materials.

    Leave a comment:


  • Craig in Denver
    replied
    Originally posted by chris***@sbcglo View Post
    Craig in Denver, thanks for looking.I try to spell everything correctly, but occasionally I'll slip in some slang... and occasionally I'll just slip.
    Chris, I can't help it; spelling is the only thing that came easy for me. Like your welding. It's called creative spelling and I enjoy someone else's skills (welding and spelling sparring). I'll watch myself closer in the future.

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    Originally posted by DSW View Post
    Very nice work. Teak and SS, I'll assume its for outdoor use? Not that it wouldn't look good IN my house.
    Yeah, these four tables were going to live outside on someone's outdoor patio or something for entertaining guests. I never did get to see their new home... I'm sure it was a pretty nice spread.

    JimYoung and Craig in Denver, thanks for looking. Craig, I try to spell everything correctly, but occasionally I'll slip in some slang... and occasionally I'll just slip.

    Leave a comment:

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