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New Welding Talbe... Finished!

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  • tasslehawf
    started a topic New Welding Talbe... Finished!

    New Welding Talbe... Finished!

    Ok. You remember this one:


    Well here is the final result (minus paint or something to protect it from the weather):





    Last edited by tasslehawf; 04-07-2008, 09:41 PM.

  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    Originally posted by kiwi View Post
    Chris and Ed,
    Sorry, that was my mistake. When I saw his signature line I read it as a MM 180 instead of a Syncrowave 180. That is why I brought up the FCAW as opposed to the SMAW.
    Nick
    Nick, It was a good question. I don't see any reason for you to apologise.

    Leave a comment:


  • kiwi
    replied
    Originally posted by chris***@sbcglo View Post
    Well, thanks for clarifying, Ed.

    Yes, Kiwi, Tassle's working with a Maxstar and, if I remember correctly, was working with some heavier, dirtier material. The plating, combined with welding out of doors was giving him Tungsten contamination issues. So... I said, change it over to SMAW and burn it in, dawg!

    Sure, if he had a MIG machine, that table would have been done ZING-BANG! Fluxcore or not. But, he has a Maxstar and it's all good.

    Hey Tassle, I dig your table idea... I'm not at all knocking your work... I'm just putting in my .02 about your machine's capabilites as I see it. I have the same machine (Maxstar 200DX) and it rocks in both modes.

    If I'm out on an installation and don't have my Passport with me, I'll ALWAYS bring some rods for the Maxstar. Sometimes the situation is just too persnickety for GTAW.

    Your fluxcore vs. SMAW question is probably better suited for the hardcore heavy metal weldors on this site. I don't run any fluxcore for my kind of work, but I will occassionally burn some rods when it's appropriate.
    Chris and Ed,
    Sorry, that was my mistake. When I saw his signature line I read it as a MM 180 instead of a Syncrowave 180. That is why I brought up the FCAW as opposed to the SMAW.
    Nick

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    Originally posted by Broccoli1 View Post
    Sorta Yes but in this case tasslehawf has a 200DX and Chris was trying to point out that it is an Excellent SMAW machine and to use it in that mode.
    Well, thanks for clarifying, Ed.

    Yes, Kiwi, Tassle's working with a Maxstar and, if I remember correctly, was working with some heavier, dirtier material. The plating, combined with welding out of doors was giving him Tungsten contamination issues. So... I said, change it over to SMAW and burn it in, dawg!

    Sure, if he had a MIG machine, that table would have been done ZING-BANG! Fluxcore or not. But, he has a Maxstar and it's all good.

    Hey Tassle, I dig your table idea... I'm not at all knocking your work... I'm just putting in my .02 about your machine's capabilites as I see it. I have the same machine (Maxstar 200DX) and it rocks in both modes.

    If I'm out on an installation and don't have my Passport with me, I'll ALWAYS bring some rods for the Maxstar. Sometimes the situation is just too persnickety for GTAW.

    Your fluxcore vs. SMAW question is probably better suited for the hardcore heavy metal weldors on this site. I don't run any fluxcore for my kind of work, but I will occassionally burn some rods when it's appropriate.

    Leave a comment:


  • Broccoli1
    replied
    Originally posted by kiwi View Post
    Hey Chris,
    Can't you do pretty much everything with Flux Core that you can with a stick?
    Isn't FCAW a faster process and results in less waste (ie small left over electrodes) than SMAW?
    Thanks,
    Nick
    Sorta Yes but in this case tasslehawf has a 200DX and Chris was trying to point out that it is an Excellent SMAW machine and to use it in that mode.

    Leave a comment:


  • kiwi
    replied
    Originally posted by chris***@sbcglo View Post
    Thank you.

    I was trying to emphasize this a while back in this thread.
    As far as looks go... some of the tidiest welding I've seen was done by accomplished stick weldors...
    ...Just check out Flangejockey's work sometime.
    Hey Chris,
    Can't you do pretty much everything with Flux Core that you can with a stick?
    Isn't FCAW a faster process and results in less waste (ie small left over electrodes) than SMAW?
    Thanks,
    Nick

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    Originally posted by mooseye View Post
    One of the beauties of stick welding is that you can weld threw all kinds of crap including plating. It would be hard to think of anything that you cannot stick weld. Not to say that it will be as nice looking as tig or mig every time, but it is definatly the most versital and you can use it in wind,rain,snow what ever.
    Thank you.

    I was trying to emphasize this a while back in this thread.
    As far as looks go... some of the tidiest welding I've seen was done by accomplished stick weldors...
    ...Just check out Flangejockey's work sometime.

    Leave a comment:


  • mooseye
    replied
    One of the beauties of stick welding is that you can weld threw all kinds of crap including plating. It would be hard to think of anything that you cannot stick weld. Not to say that it will be as nice looking as tig or mig every time, but it is definatly the most versital and you can use it in wind,rain,snow what ever.

    Leave a comment:


  • tasslehawf
    replied
    More and more good reasons to pick up a mig. Gotta fix my electrical dilemma first and also my money dilemma.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    Unless I'm putting it along an open side (where the caster base plate is longer than the pad on the frame), I rosette weld the bolt holes and haven't had any come off yet, otherwise I'll run a fillet along the plate.

    Leave a comment:


  • tasslehawf
    replied
    I'm assuming you're welding the bolt holes?

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    I right there with you. I used to bolt them everytime, now I make a judgement call. If I had a Scotchman to shear and punch out the holes, maybe I'd always bolt them; I have bandsaws and drill presses, so I know I'm much faster with a MIG than I am with a saw, a drill, some hardware and a ratchet. Besides, if it's for myself, I figure if something breaks ten years down, I can always cut it out- worst case scenario.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    I weld them more often than I bolt them - but that doesn't mean its the designed intent.

    That's all I'm saying.

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisgay@sbcglo
    replied
    Originally posted by Fishy Jim View Post
    Caster plates typically are not meant to be welded. You cook the grease out of the bearings and possibly melt any seals that were present (cheap casters lack the seals, and some even lack the grease ).

    That's not to say I don't do it too.

    They wouldn't have bolt holes if they meant you to run a bead around `em.

    Just burn 'em in and get the show on the road. Anymore, depending on the application, I usually just weld castors on. I'm done in five minutes, no holes, no bolts, drilling, no assembly, no problems. Looking back, I've never had to service a single castor (assuming it was properly rated). It's not like they're spinning at 10,000 RPM.
    Just my opinion, Fish.

    I just checked out one of my welding tables. It's an old hydraulic lift table I picked up used. They sell them new at Grainger/McMaster but this one's probably 50 yrs. old. Are the castors bolted? No, they're welded. And they're only tacked in four corners. When I say tacked, I mean about a 3/8" long dab. The table alone weighs 400-500 pounds, and I don't even want to think about how much weight I've had on top of it. No worries.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    Caster plates typically are not meant to be welded. You cook the grease out of the bearings and possibly melt any seals that were present (cheap casters lack the seals, and some even lack the grease ).

    That's not to say I don't do it too.

    They wouldn't have bolt holes if they meant you to run a bead around `em.

    Leave a comment:

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