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What has 104 parts, 592 welds and takes 2 guys all weekend to make?

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  • What has 104 parts, 592 welds and takes 2 guys all weekend to make?

    Built us a new metal rack. Got to the point around here that metal was everywhere in little stacks, up against the wall, stuck here, tripping over it over there.

    So we knocked out a new one. 4' wide, 7' tall, 3 sections. first section is 4 foot wide, second section is 3 foot wide, for a total rack length of 7 feet. That way an 8 foot stick is well supported in 3 spots, and a 12' stick (what we normally cut stuff to for storage) is only hanging out 30" on either end, and has good support.

    Main uprights are 1/4" wall, the crossbars are 1/8" wall.

    What a bugger of a job. Took 2 of us all weekend to get it knocked out. First 30-40 welds were perfect, and as the weekend wore on you got to the point where you cared less and less about how it looked, but just that it would be structurally sound. Toward the end it was "C'mon man, it's your turn to weld...", "No way man, I've been welding since lunch, it's your turn..."... ...lol...




  • Sberry
    replied
    For a question from a PM. You could probably pull a couple thousand pounds safely from one of those branch arms.
    Attached Files

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  • Sberry
    replied
    The only weld that is doing any substantial amount of "work" on the branches is the top one. A failure would never occur from pulling this weld off under this type of load, it would come from compressing on the underside, either the bottom of the branch or in the column, take a tremendous amount of load and there is another tube opposite in this case.
    It would be interesting for an engineer to run this project up for some analysis. I am very critical of my own work and hindsight is a wonderful thing, most things I build I would improve again from shear experience.
    I think this a great project and has so many basic design options and basic loading, good layman's study and could certainly help with basic design skills.
    Some of the concerns here are legit but not crucial such as sway and twist. They could be better explained or drawn by someone that knew how. My deal would be to try to see how much I could get in this space with the least amount of time and materials.

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  • Sberry
    replied
    Originally posted by Bert View Post
    Sberry,
    ok, now that you got me and I'm sure others wondering, I'm sure it could be BRACED differently (though I have no clue how, some of those "branches" might not hold, depending on how much more metal he adds on top), how would he double the capacity???More branches?
    Remember, each branch and brace here holds only the weight applied to it, not the total of the whole rack, plus its divided by 3.
    Now you could weld some pieces of rod to the posts to rack shorts across. As Ironhead said, this thing is strong and then some.
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  • Sberry
    replied
    generally I might have made the arms almost horizontal with a little keeper to keep material and rounds from rolling off, took about one set out to give a little more space and added the bracing horizontal to make cross rack for shorts, could even use expanded metal on one set to make a good place for small drops. With this design one could basically add as many shelves between as desired.
    Attached Files

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  • monte55
    replied
    Been looking at the rack. Nice job. Idea.......how about bending the end angles on all the horizontal pieces? You will save a lot of cutting and welding.
    That small of an angle would be easy even without a bender.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bert
    replied
    IronHead: YOU HAVING FUN WITH YOUR CRAYONS???!!!!
    I agree with you though....I'm sure he's got welds in the middle "X"

    Tasslehawf: I'm kinda shocked you have no sway with no diagonals!!!

    What my main concern was, is the "branches" are just held up at one point/end. Should he fill that sucker up with metal, I would think it would crack/bend. I just wanted to see how SBerry would do it. ALWAYS looking for new ways to make things better

    Leave a comment:


  • tasslehawf
    replied
    Originally posted by Bert View Post
    well, if you ran "several", makes me think you would run them horizontally to fit them in, but that would let it sway. He went diagonally, which is a better way. or am I wrong?
    I made a larger rack (8') with no diagonal bracing and one long span instead of a support in the middle. In fact, I use angle iron instead of sq. tubing to attach the two ends together and there was no sway.

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  • Bert
    replied
    Originally posted by tasslehawf View Post
    The way I tend to design my pieces, I would have simply ran several sq. tubing pieces between the uprights. I could see there could be some concern with the "spindly" cross braces.

    well, if you ran "several", makes me think you would run them horizontally to fit them in, but that would let it sway. He went diagonally, which is a better way. or am I wrong?

    Leave a comment:


  • tasslehawf
    replied
    Originally posted by Bert View Post
    Sberry,
    ok, now that you got me and I'm sure others wondering, I'm sure it could be BRACED differently (though I have no clue how, some of those "branches" might not hold, depending on how much more metal he adds on top), how would he double the capacity???More branches?
    The way I tend to design my pieces, I would have simply ran several sq. tubing pieces between the uprights. I could see there could be some concern with the "spindly" cross braces.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bert
    replied
    Sberry,
    ok, now that you got me and I'm sure others wondering, I'm sure it could be BRACED differently (though I have no clue how, some of those "branches" might not hold, depending on how much more metal he adds on top), how would he double the capacity???More branches?

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    It is a nice job and don't mean to lose sight of that but since this is a discussion forum of ideas this is a good project to give some slight critique to. A couple of slight design and bracing changes would have allowed for ease of construction and allowed to double the storage capacity. I wish I was a draftsman, this post design is basically very good in principle.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    With a project like that the welding could be engineered to some extent. Either top and bottom of the tube or a pass down 2 sides. It certainly doesn't hurt to weld 100% but with that design I would weld top and bottom.
    We built a gob of tube work for a new plant, I would count the tubes, figure out the cut list and have the steel yard stack/gang cut, build the legs stacked or make a master and clamp the rest to that, set it up so all the welds are vert down, 2 welds per tube.
    Building a 1 off rack for ones own shop can tolerate the time and material in-efficiencies so to speak. One of the reasons I would invest in new materials would be to get the use of someone else's big equipment, I make use of the yards shear, big saws, etc. Like you guys I rarely have to haul long materials. Have some cuts made when I buy and can fit it in a pickup truck.

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  • Sberry
    replied
    I agree, nice job and well worth the effort. I did one similar but used 4 sets of uprights.

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  • tasslehawf
    replied
    Originally posted by vectorsolid View Post
    I've got an 18hp opposed twin cylinder engine in mind for the cart project. That way I can have a pipe sticking up on either side of the coffin.
    Yeah. That's what I was figuring would look best.

    Leave a comment:

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