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  • Handy560
    replied
    How safe is the secret weapon? I guess it depends what exactly you plug into and that the equipment is auto line sensing...

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  • Bodybagger
    replied
    Almost every place has 240V or 208V

    I have a secret weapon... I made a welder plug with 2 25' 12ga extension cords going into it. Both neutrals are tied to the center leg, and each hot is tied to the outter legs. The other ends of the cords have standard 120V male plugs. Plug it in one outlet and plug it into another outlet on a different circuit. If it's a residential or commercial 120/240 1 phase service, 50% of the time, there will be 240V across the two hots. If not, try another plug on another circuit.

    If it's commercial 120/208 3 phase, 67% of the time, you will get 208V. If not, try another plug.

    You will get enough power to run a good size welder or plasma cutter.

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  • Bert
    replied
    thanks Bob

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  • aametalmaster
    replied
    The Stargon SS Shielding Gas, a mixture of argon, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen, is designed for joining a variety of stainless steels under the most ...
    findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb4400/is_200306/ai_n15309992 - 29k

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  • KEENAVV
    replied
    I have a little Lincoln SP100 w/.023 SS and tri mix that works quite well for the little SS I do.

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  • Bert
    replied
    tenfingers

    thanks for the tip, I'll look it up later

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  • Bert
    replied
    Pickling

    James,
    LOL, sounds like Cliff on Cheers....my mind is like that too! Whish I was like
    Dumbledor in Harry Potte and put/save my useless thoughts in the pensive

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  • tenfingers
    replied
    A friend of mine uses "Stargon" from Praxair for the stainless that he uses in his sculptures. He dosen't know what the mix is though. You could google it though.

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  • fun4now
    replied
    Fun, do you know what the pickling recipe is?
    little dill weed, some vinegar, and..........wait you meant for SS.
    naaa sorry been years sense i worked with plaiting metals, and the old noodle is full of too much useless info to dig out the good stuff.

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  • Bert
    replied
    mikeswelding,
    thanks, do you know the best tr-mix to use? I talked to a guy that had a friend using a "special" tr-mix for doing aluminum sched 40 truck racks. Racks were beautuful, and he said he didn't know what it was, but it was a "special" tri-mix his friend used other than 100% argon or 10% helium/90% argon that most people use for aluminum.
    Fun, do you know what the pickling recipe is?
    thanks guys,
    bert

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  • fun4now
    replied
    the passport would be grate is ya have the $$ and or the work load to support it. good excuse to give the wife to get a new toy. i was supposed to do some SS restaurant work for the wifes ex-boss,( that put the seal on getting the TA-185, it was building carts at home) but she quit the job and i lost my connect.
    the passport + allows for aluminum (not just a spool gun but a different arc as well) well worth the little extra $ to go +
    pickling is a chemical wash.

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  • mikeswelding
    replied
    SS machine

    Best machine for onsite or mobile on SS IMHO is the Passport. It is light, runs on 110 or 220 AND has a setting especially for SS. I have done numerous onsite repair jobs in restaurants and it works great. Also, tri-mix gas is recommended for SS.

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  • Bert
    replied
    Phax, what do you mean by "pickling" it? And as far as "welding the bottom seam and fusing the top", I thought the sheets were butted up (edge of each sheet) together? so there wouldn't be much of a seam, eh???
    thanks muchos,
    bert

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  • dabar39
    replied
    Bert, I have done a bunch of commercial stainless countertops. The ones that I have worked with are usually 24 to 28 gauge brushed stainless. Very difficult to try and weld. Wherever the seam is going to be we usually break the adjoining edges and use a spot welder to join them. too much warpage and too much work to polish them up for a complete match. Wherever the seam lies we put a bead of silicone to take up the space between the breaks.


    P.S. If you don't understand my post, give me a call and I'll try to better describe it. Dave

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  • SundownIII
    replied
    Bert,

    You've already got the best machine (Dynasty 200 DX) for the job. Just run it off 120v and you're there.

    If you didn't already have the Dynasty, the new Maxstar 150 STH (w/hi freq) is the machine I'd recommend. About 14 lbs, and 120v capable. Plenty machine to weld the SS you're talking about. Check it out in the new Miller catalog.

    Leave a comment:

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