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Dynasty 200 DX problem

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  • julman99
    replied
    Originally posted by Sundown View Post
    Orange woud be 2% Ceriated and that should be the easist to start. For .080 aluminum I would set the max amps to no more than 100, most likely 90 to start, Balance on 70 and freq on 120. I would switch to 1/16" (3/32" should work also) tungsten and taper it to 30 degrees with a .010 flat on the tip. Be very sure you have a good ground. When I first got my Dynasty it would sometimes do the same thing, I removed the cover and ran a very clean .009 feeler thru the points and have had no trouble since. Just stuff to try, let us know if you work it out.
    Where are the points located inside the cover? I removed it but didnt find the points

    Thank you very much

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  • Bert
    replied
    When mine doesn't start, I mess with the ground to get a good connection to the part.
    I made my ground on my new MM251 with a hose clamp and a vice grip. Learned that from an old timer, and works great! I don't like the ones from the store. Gonna do that to my 200 tomorrow...

    Leave a comment:


  • phila.renewal
    replied
    Originally posted by KB Fabrications View Post
    It removes the frost from the tip of the tungsten and allows for a positive start. Since the frosting is the likely culprit of the poor start, it makes sense that removing a bit of it on the tip would help.
    Ah, got you. So do it on the work but not on the area about to be welded.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by phila.renewal; 05-11-2007, 05:37 PM.

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  • KB Fabrications
    replied
    Originally posted by phila.renewal View Post
    I've never tried that. What does it do (I mean what effect does it have that makes it start better)?
    It removes the frost from the tip of the tungsten and allows for a positive start. Since the frosting is the likely culprit of the poor start, it makes sense that removing a bit of it on the tip would help.

    Leave a comment:


  • phila.renewal
    replied
    Originally posted by KB Fabrications View Post
    One good practice to get into is to lightly scratch the tungsten to your work before you strike an arc. Your start should be immediate when you do that.
    I've never tried that. What does it do (I mean what effect does it have that makes it start better)?

    Leave a comment:


  • TS-Off-Road
    replied
    Originally posted by KB Fabrications View Post
    One good practice to get into is to lightly scratch the tungsten to your work before you strike an arc. Your start should be immediate when you do that.
    X2

    That method has worked very well with my 200DX

    Leave a comment:


  • Loadsmasher
    replied
    Originally posted by KB Fabrications View Post
    Something no one has mentioned yet is post-flow. If you have inadequate post-flow and/or you pull your torch away from the weldment too soon you will have tungsten frosting.
    I have been doing that. I'm new to TIG and so I'll have to watch some of these tips and concentrate on not creating bad habits.

    Thanks,

    JD

    Leave a comment:


  • KB Fabrications
    replied
    Something no one has mentioned yet is post-flow. If you have inadequate post-flow and/or you pull your torch away from the weldment too soon you will have tungsten frosting. It is something that is more prevalent with inverters in general but is not limited to them and will cause the exact problem that the initial poster experienced.

    One good practice to get into is to lightly scratch the tungsten to your work before you strike an arc. Your start should be immediate when you do that.

    If you are using pure or zirconiated with a Dynasty you are not realizing the full potential of your machine. Inverters are designed to run with a pointed tungsten and both pure and zirc will want to ball almost immediately. If you are going to use them, you might as well set your machine to 60 hz and run it like a regular transformer based unit.

    IME, lanthanated and ceriated work best on my 300DX and 350DX. Thoriated also works well but I have gotten away from that because of health reasons and the performance isn't necessarily better.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sundown
    replied
    Originally posted by brightspark View Post
    hey Sundown,

    your daughter will do well there its a very good college and the area's real nice. If you ever make it over to visit her you'll have to drop by my shop and burn some rods
    Funny enough I was working in Runcorn last year for 3 months so I know that area pretty well too.

    Really is a small world!!!
    I will most likely be over there summer after this one, I want to do some touring in Germany anyway. If you are still hanging aroung here then I will get your address and visit. I mostly am on the Hobart "weld Talk" forum at http://www.hobartwelders.com but visit here and Miller "Motorsport" often.
    Last edited by Sundown; 05-11-2007, 01:19 PM.

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  • Loadsmasher
    replied
    Wow, lots of good tips. Time to go out to the shop and try them out.

    Thanks everyone!

    JD

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  • TJS
    replied
    All I use right now are Zirconiated(Sp) tungstens. They are nice with my Dyn 300 machine and a gas lens.
    T.J.

    Leave a comment:


  • phila.renewal
    replied
    If you don't already have, you can get an assortment of tungsten (lanthanated and ceriated), collets, collet bodies and cups from HTP America in a handy kit box for reasonable price ($55 + shipping).

    I ordered their gas lens kit, collets and a few lanthanted tungsten of each size -- they are very helpful and ship same day.

    1-800-USA-Weld

    No affiliation -- just hope this is helpful.

    Leave a comment:


  • trstek
    replied
    Originally posted by phila.renewal View Post
    Believe it or not, what it might be telling you is you have the wrong tungsten diameter. If a doped tungsten forms a ball when you don't want it to, your tungsten is too small for the current you are running.

    If you wanted it balled and the arc is dancing around but more heat for a second focuses the arc, your tungsten is too big. What you are doing is heating up the tungsten which results in better electron emission -- it should be hot enough at the current you are running to not dance around without gunning it.

    Know what I mean?
    This is new to me, I will do some testing and try different diameters and settings, thank you.

    Tom

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  • phila.renewal
    replied
    Originally posted by trstek View Post
    When it has a ball on the tip and the arc is dancing everywhere, sometimes if you jump on the power fast and heavy, it will stablize, then back off power. Do this on practice metal, I have melted more than once getting the touch. Better to have a angle tip, not a ball.

    Believe it or not, what it might be telling you is you have the wrong tungsten diameter. If a doped tungsten forms a ball when you don't want it to, your tungsten is too small for the current you are running.

    If you wanted it balled and the arc is dancing around but more heat for a second focuses the arc, your tungsten is too big. What you are doing is heating up the tungsten which results in better electron emission -- it should be hot enough at the current you are running to not dance around without gunning it.

    Know what I mean?

    Leave a comment:


  • trstek
    replied
    Had my dynasty a couple of months, starts are good with both the ceriated and lanth (1.5%).

    The tips ball up quick depending on where the balance is. Like you said, needs to be ground then. Mine does not like a balled tip at all. Its like a jacobs ladder.

    When mine doesn't start, I mess with the ground to get a good connection to the part.

    Have used mine at 150hz on aluminum.

    Setting it back to factory default is a good idea.

    When it has a ball on the tip and the arc is dancing everywhere, sometimes if you jump on the power fast and heavy, it will stablize, then back off power. Do this on practice metal, I have melted more than once getting the touch. Better to have a angle tip, not a ball.
    Last edited by trstek; 05-11-2007, 08:53 AM.

    Leave a comment:

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