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6013 & 7024 Uses

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  • Coalsmoke
    replied
    Originally posted by paulrbrown View Post
    If you use the 1/16 6013 with EN straight polarity, you should be able to weld .032 or less. Both are Rutile covered [Titiania], but I believe the 7024 has Iron powder, which makes it so fast, known as a fast fill rod. Hopes this helps, Paul, by the way, some folks poopoo 6013 rod, but read the specs, it is just as strong as 7018 in certain applications, just not low hydrogen.
    Yup, I agree. I used them a lot in doing structural ironwork, especially for the ground plate tie-ins. The iron powder offers a higher deposition efficiency, hence in part the faster travel speed. Secondly, I believe (but am not sure) that the Tinania (technically Titanium Dioxide) adds stability to the arc allowing a higher current to be used. Someone who knows more about the properties of TiO2 could qualify this if they know

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  • Steve
    replied
    Thanks for clearing up that k stuff. I was wondering where the other three zeros were. LOL Learning all the time.

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  • joebass
    replied
    6013 and 7024 are way different. 7014 is close to 6013. I don't like to use 6013 or 7014. For sheetmetal I would rather use 6011.

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  • paulrbrown
    replied
    Hey Fabman, well, I would not go over about 30-40 DC negative amps and you will have to go down to a 1/16 or 5/64 rod, if you want to reduce the heat a little, you can try running a verticle or 45 degree or what ever you are comfortable with downhill weld, that will put less heat in the material. Hope this will help, be aware that the thin rod is much more expensive than the thick due to the extra cost of drawing the wire through the forming dies, but it is well worh it if you can weld things thought impossible with Stick/SMAW. Let everyone know how you make out. Paul

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  • calweld
    replied
    I've never used 6013, but have burned many pounds of 7024. BTW, you won't find 7024 good for use on sheetmetal. It takes high heat, ideal for filling large V-grooves with multi-pass welds. Flat/horizontal only, very high deposition rate. Before I switched to innershield/dualshield wires, I used it for splicing heavy I-beams in shoring work, also found it ideal for welding blades and A/R or plowsteel wearstrips on buckets, the "book" says it's low penetration but you set the job up right and pour the heat to it you can compensate for that.

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  • FABMAN
    replied
    Originally posted by paulrbrown View Post
    If you use the 1/16 6013 with EN straight polarity, you should be able to weld .032 or less.
    hey paul, i want to try arc welding some .030" sheet metal i have around the next time i get out in my shop. what amperage would you suggest starting out with ? hopefully next week i will get a chance to give it a shot....thanks again everyone.

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  • paulrbrown
    replied
    weldingrod, you said after 25 years and several attempts, now wait a minute, thats 3 or 4 over 25 years? Anywho, give 6013 a shot, I have to admit, I am not real fond of 6013 for overhead, but flat or horizontal and even vertical should not be a big problem, what size are you using, and at what amperage, I have found the lack of penetration takes me a bit to get re used to after 6010,6011 and 7018, but once you get your amps dialed in, it can look as good or better than a mig weld. Give it another shot, and play with your arc length/speed also, you are not pushing are you?, cause the slag will roll under will quick that way, Hope this helps out, for you to Steve. Time for my Lactose ingestion, [Ice Cream that is] Later, Paul

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  • weld-tek
    replied
    must be me,but after 25 yrs and several attempts i cant get the hang of 6013.slag always get in the weld,looks great till you chip the slag.probaly operator error but i just dont like em.

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  • cnslmva
    replied
    Paul,
    Just trying to help where I can.

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  • paulrbrown
    replied
    Chris, right on, I just was not sure how to state it. Paul

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  • cnslmva
    replied
    Steve,
    ksi is short for thousand psi so for example: 72ksi would equal 72,000 psi. Hope this clarifies the problem.

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  • paulrbrown
    replied
    Steve, the Plus is for Iron Powder added to the coating, that ksi is the way some manufacturers say 1000lbs per square inch, k being the symbol for 1000, the metric is the next figure, besides they would not use kilos with inches would they now, hope this has not confused the issue, the Charpy test is pretty standard, not much of a weight swinging to make something break is it.Gotta go and light the grill, later, Paul

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  • Steve
    replied
    Paul, Ya I see the tensil there and wonder if thats what the plus is for. But then I noticed thats 79 ksi, not 79 psi. So it must be a typo as they list the metric as 550 MPa which would be mega pascals. The math works sorta so is typo. ksi posed to be psi. Esab has good rods but I use the Lincoln for stick in all sizes and the guys in the field are used to it.

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  • Steve
    replied
    Paul, Ya I see the tensil there and wonder if thats what the plus is for. But then I noticed thats 79 ksi, not 79 psi. Kilograms and pounds are'nt the same measure.

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  • paulrbrown
    replied
    Steve, as an example, this is ESAB Sureweld 10P Plus which is a 6010 rod, I copied this from their site, look at that tensile strength. Paul

    Typical Mechanical Properties
    As Welded
    Yield Strength 67 ksi, 465 MPa
    Tensile Strength 79 ksi, 550 MPa
    Elongation in 2" 29 %
    Typical Charpy V-Notch Impact Properties
    Testing Temperature 0ºF (-18ºC)
    As Welded 27 ft.-lbs., 37 J
    Testing Temperature -20ºF (-29ºC)
    As Welded 22 ft.-lbs., 30 J

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