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  • #16
    One more thing that adds on to this is WE have and know our definition of skilled labors.But how many contractors and or bussiness owners feel the same way about it? What i mean is for them its all about the bottom line. How fast it can get done..what corners can be cut..and whats the cheapest material that can be used.And of course who they can get to do the job at the cheapest wage and still get a quality product.
    Like i said before this happens the most in our trade.And lets not forget the hands in the cookie jar syndrome also. that even when its the governments hand that gets caught ..it costs US.prime example FED EX FORUM IN T.N.whos going to pay to make it right???????... Take a guess. Once again it comes down to credientials wich in our case arent a requirement as it is in other trades.but thats another story.We have to find a way to change the game.

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    • #17
      maybe certs shouldnt be a throw away thing use it on this job and forget it, regular certification should be the norm. i know but then who pays for it and who decides its good for how long, but it would show the ability to produce quality work.
      you dont have to go over seas to make a quality product and still make a profit, laber is not the only corner to cut it just seems to be the easyest fix and we will all pay in the end.
      thanks for the help
      ......or..........
      hope i helped
      sigpic
      feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. [email protected]
      summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
      JAMES

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      • #18
        Skilled welder available

        I have an AAS degree in welding engineering technology, I intend to get CWI certification this winter. I have a burning desire to get an engineering degree. I have over six years fabrication experience. I have taken more advanced math and science courses than I needed for my AAS. I have the capability and desire to independently practice virtually any certification procedure that would lead to a good job. I currently work 50 hours a week. I also do side work using my own tig machine 5 to 10 hours a week. Previously I have worked on core drill rigs in dangerous, remote conditions for 84+ hours a week. I would be willing to work for weeks/months on end for the right pay. I would be more than happy to submit a resume to employers who may be reading this. I would like to hear all suggestions for good paying jobs from my peers who may be reading this

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        • #19
          For me and a lot of people I know, it was the "lure of easy money" that got us into welding. When you're in high school and see guys that graduated the prior year, bring in $1400 weekly paychecks, it really sticks in your head. The thought is, "why go to college for 4 years when I can make $1400 a week next year?" Of course, maturity and experience comes into play at some point and you see long term the benefits of both, rather than just the short term gains.

          People don't go into welding because they like the dangers, breathing the smoke, getting burned, living with burn scars, sweating your *** off, and such. They do it for the money. As the years have gone by, companies have dumped on welders, cutting the money back more and more. This is why people have not been getting into welding like they did before.

          The high school I went to still has a welding program. Not only that, but they have, for the first time in its history, hired a second welding instructor.
          VICA is still alive and well...as well as they can be, with the decline of vocational classes in high school.

          Guess what, corporate America???!!! Not everybody wants to be an engineer!!! oh, and yeah, you do need welders afterall.

          Now is coming the time that those that stuck with welding will gain.

          Originally posted by CarmenElectrode
          and $17/hour... well, I'll stop now. That's like minimum wage here in So. Cal. I think I'll get down from my soap box now.
          Here in TN, we can still buy a 2000sq ft home for about $100k, so $17/hr isn't bad money.

          Although it's easy for us to bash politicians for our problems, it's a good idea to note that they are obviously doing something to keep more of our jobs from going overseas....or we'd not be anticipating such a shortage of welders here in the next decade.

          I was thinking today, and this thought seems to fit in to this topic:
          Try self-study, learn the laws, then try to represent your best friend in his divorce...and you will not be allowed. Self-study and then try to charge somebody $25 to remove a wart, and you can probably be jailed.

          ....but pick up a welding lead for the first time, weld on a trailer hitch for $35, and unless it breaks, you have done nothing wrong.

          Lawyers and doctors have protected their investment (education) by disallowing others to perform those duties without the proper education. Why isn't the same done with welders? Why is it that you have to pass a "bar" exam to practice law, but you can weld something with no experience at all? It would be nice if those that claim to be welders, but work in muffler shops, were not allowed to bring down the profession for the rest of us.

          Although I just recently got my first "office job" after 19 years of welding, you can bet I'll be keeping an eye on the trade...and will always have the ability to go back.

          Comment


          • #20
            ^ I didnt get into welding for the money. When I first fired up the stick welder at my buddies garage the only thing in my mind was this is the CRAZIEST thing Ive ever tried....But it was really cool and I figured that learning to weld would open doors.

            In my area there is a saturation of college educated people and little to no trades people (80% -20%) and so the guys that went to trade school (plumbing/electrical/hvac) demand top dollar and if they can get it then more power to them.....but when it comes to welding I always hear well I could just go down to homedepot and buy a welder and fix it myself.....its too under valued -

            Welding now a days has to be the most under rated trade in america.

            and in my area a 2000sf house is selling for 275,000 so $17 an hour isnt all that good -

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            • #21
              I could just go down to homedepot and buy a welder and fix it myself.
              Reminds me of the nut-case who stopped by my shop last month. Building a motorcycle with a 350 HP Corvette motor (similar to a Boss Hoss) but using a 330mm rear tire, while the Boss has only a 230mm. Too cheap to pay $1500 for a correct wheel, wanted me to section a wheel & TIG in a filler strip. I politely told him to go away.

              His parting words were "Well, maybe I'll TIG it myself".

              Which is about as likely as me becoming President
              Barry Milton
              ____________________

              HTP Invertig 201
              HTP MIG2400

              Miller Trailblazer 302, Spoolmatic 30A, Suitcase 12RC
              Clarke Hotshot

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              • #22
                Originally posted by arcdawg
                ^ I didnt get into welding for the money.
                Maybe not, but I doubt that sweating all day and getting burned was considered a benefit.
                Originally posted by arcdawg
                and in my area a 2000sf house is selling for 275,000 so $17 an hour isnt all that good -
                Dude, it sounds like you're not doing very well there, considering the pay and cost of living. Ever considered moving?

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by precisionworks
                  Reminds me of the nut-case who stopped by my shop last month. Building a motorcycle with a 350 HP Corvette motor (similar to a Boss Hoss) but using a 330mm rear tire, while the Boss has only a 230mm. Too cheap to pay $1500 for a correct wheel, wanted me to section a wheel & TIG in a filler strip. I politely told him to go away.

                  His parting words were "Well, maybe I'll TIG it myself".

                  Which is about as likely as me becoming President
                  That's why it would be nice if people actually had to pass a test to work as a welder ANYWHERE!!! Why can't we be required to have professional licenses, just like doctors and dentists? Sure, it would cost us something for that, but the pay rate would be driven up a bit more to compensate for it.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    they had a similer problem with carpenters in florida after a huricane, every fool and his 3 toothed brother went down to rebuild houses made quick $$ and split befor it was realized they didnt have a clue. the goverment started only alowing licenced IN florida contractors that had been working there for 4 years to work. good idea but a lil late for many, i can only wonder if it was the same in new or. after catreana or did they lern there lesson??
                    i consider Trades to be a profeson because i took the time to lern it and do it right, but not all do. most watch the weekend woreor show or flip this house and think i can do that, and maybee they can, BUT is it done right or will the new owner take it in the rear end in 3 months when stuff starts to fall down.
                    thanks for the help
                    ......or..........
                    hope i helped
                    sigpic
                    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. [email protected]
                    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
                    JAMES

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by fun4now
                      ... most watch the weekend woreor show or flip this house and think i can do that, and maybee they can, BUT is it done right or will the new owner take it in the rear end in 3 months when stuff starts to fall down.
                      Amen brother. I saw a Flip this House, Atlanta version a couple weeks ago, and couldn't believe it. This guy was so cheap, it was amazing. He was doing _everything_ he could to get bottom dollar labor, continually beating up his job supe about the cost of labor and the (often) lack of productivity (surprising, huh?), and unfortunately for the new owners, he pretty much succeeded. I've always been a firm believer in doing it right the first time, and the stuff he was pulling, all I could think of was those poor people, who were most likely 1st time buyers, all they saw was the new carpet and paint and some fancy rented furniture and decor, they no idea what went into "rebuilding" their formerly p**p covered walls and floors, the low ball electrical work and the "new" roof. Welll... actually, they do, all they have to do is just watch the show. Wonder how they'll felt after seeing it. And worst of all, the address was listed on the show, so anyone could have seen it. Good luck on re-selling it. As they say, Buyer Beware.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Engloid
                        That's why it would be nice if people actually had to pass a test to work as a welder ANYWHERE!!! Why can't we be required to have professional licenses, just like doctors and dentists? Sure, it would cost us something for that, but the pay rate would be driven up a bit more to compensate for it.

                        yes engloid speak man SPEAK!!!!!

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          alha
                          just think how bad they are going to feel when they see that show on there house, i to feel for them. cheap labor is just that cheap.
                          i could flip a house make a profit and still do it right, but i have 20 years in the industry and know when and where to hire pro's and what can bet done without if you are willing to put in the time, paint is a good do it yourself thing, not to say painters are not skilled good ones are fast and neat and will get it done right and fast, knowing what primers to use where and what prep is needed. in most situations its better to use a pro but if you have the time paint can still be done right without as can some other stuff but electrical and even pluming can go bad fast, you ever herd a boom or knock when you turned on a faucet, I'm betting that was not done by a pro, and how long be for the leaks start to show threw the dry wall. you cant just buy a torch or even a hammer and think you can start using it for every thing it was intended for.
                          thanks for the help
                          ......or..........
                          hope i helped
                          sigpic
                          feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. [email protected]
                          summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
                          JAMES

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Coalsmoke
                            While I'll drink to that, we must keep in mind that a welder with a special piece of paper does not necessarily make them a professional. It certainly would help 'weed-out' those that shouldn't be in the trade in the first place, but IMHO, there is a serious problem with a general lack of professionalism among many trades, welders included. If welders trained, acted, and represented as professionals, this dream would be much closer to becoming achieved in short order.
                            I agree.

                            The problem lies in the fact that just anybody can weld on a trailer hitch for their neighbor...whether they are qualified or not. This means that everybody thinks that all it takes is the access to a welding machine to be a welder. If people knew they were facing a big fine by doing welding work when they weren't qualified, it would change things a bit in the right direction. Not only that, but things would be even tighter for those actually getting into welding for a living. I'm all for separating the men from the boys in this business.

                            I have access to law books at the local library, but no matter how well I know that stuff, I still can't legally represent anybody but myself.

                            Years ago, if you were a welder, that's all you had to do is weld. It's still like that on a lot of jobs, but most will want you to be a welder/fitter/fabricator. When you combine these three things together and then look for a person to fill the spot, you can't just pick the best welder, you have to find a "happy medium" between the three things. The bad part is that as companies have consolidated these three things, they didn't pay any more for it.

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                            • #29
                              I agree with ENGLOID 100%! I too have recently taken a desk job after 17 years in the welding profession. It is a different environment and the pay is excellent.

                              I still keep my welding business doors open with a couple of good guys and keep my eye on the local market. Welding for someone else in East TN typically does not pay well. I have a couple of subs making 40+/HR. These guys are well experienced and certified pipe welders looking for side work. It is a good relationship and their pay is no doubt the exception to the rule.

                              Unfortunately my health will no longer allow for the heavy duty mobile work that was once second nature. Otherwise I'd be back on the road working a stick and a torch rather than a pen and a keyboard!

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by HAWK
                                I agree with ENGLOID 100%! I too have recently taken a desk job after 17 years in the welding profession. It is a different environment and the pay is excellent.

                                I still keep my welding business doors open with a couple of good guys and keep my eye on the local market. Welding for someone else in East TN typically does not pay well. I have a couple of subs making 40+/HR. These guys are well experienced and certified pipe welders looking for side work. It is a good relationship and their pay is no doubt the exception to the rule.

                                Unfortunately my health will no longer allow for the heavy duty mobile work that was once second nature. Otherwise I'd be back on the road working a stick and a torch rather than a pen and a keyboard!
                                $40/hr would be nice. I'm not making that in the office.

                                We do have some welders at our plant that bring in about $100k, but they're on a piece-rate, so they have to earn their money. THe pay is good enough that even the slow ones aren't quitting to go anywhere else. As you said though, this is an exception, not the rule. Most of the welders in our plant can't do anything but tig aluminum. They wouldn't know how to set up the machine for stick or how to weld stainless steel.

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