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Who cuts their 36" tig filler down?

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  • frank865
    replied
    That's what I did with Qxy/Acetylene, when the rod started getting hot, I'd stick it in the puddle & let it freeze. Then weld the new rod to the end of the old one, then reform the puddle & continue the weld.
    Oxy/acetylene will sure teach you how to control the puddle! Learning it first really helped me with all the other processes I've learned.

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  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    That's how I was taught with gas welding, but I have never done it outside of the classroom (I think it was just to get us used to doing little stuff).

    The consumables used in fusing the stub cost more than the stub.

    I pitch them when they're too small to comfortably hold; with the exception of 1/8", because I use those for alignment pins. Even with those, I usually just cut down a longer stick into as many pins as I need.

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  • Bulldog
    replied
    Ok here's the real question...
    Scott got me ta thinkin. How many weld the little pieces back together? Now thats the question...
    Bulldog

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  • Revlimit
    replied
    I can't remember the last time I cut one. Been doing it so long with the 36's that I can't imagine any other way.

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  • Scott T
    Guest replied
    I don't just cut them in half, I also cut them to suitable length for the particular weld and discard what is left over. How many little short pieces do you really want to save.
    I prefer short pieces for ease of use and figure you are saving money not wasting it since you can produce a better weld fast and besides filler is cheap if it is not specialize.

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  • lars66
    replied
    Originally posted by Billet Benny
    I admit, I am accustomed to cutting filler very often.. It's just one of those things. It seems that a long filler is never convenient for what I'm doing. I also hate that long end bouncing and dangling around 3 feet away.. Sometimes it messes w/ my control.

    I also ALWAYS snap tungstens in half. I never use a full length tungsten.. This is because I hate long back caps with uncomprimising passion..
    Same here.

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  • Billet Benny
    replied
    I admit, I am accustomed to cutting filler very often.. It's just one of those things. It seems that a long filler is never convenient for what I'm doing. I also hate that long end bouncing and dangling around 3 feet away.. Sometimes it messes w/ my control.

    I also ALWAYS snap tungstens in half. I never use a full length tungsten.. This is because I hate long back caps with uncomprimising passion..

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  • barnett64
    replied
    I only cut if a limited room situation, It is way too wasteful both in time and material to cut them in half

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  • MMW
    replied
    Not me.---MMW---

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  • Szelag
    replied
    3/32 I keep to length.. 1/16" even.

    .045" I defin snip in two or else its floppin all around.

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  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    The smallest I use is .045 and that just gets a 90 bent on the cold end before being added to the tube so I don't grab it when I'm going for 1/16".

    Even the 1/8" (which really sucks to use with a 150A machine btw) was never a problem at full length.

    Just goes to show how there are so many different techniques and styles out there.

    Makes me wonder how many flatten their tungsten points for DC?

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  • Matt@RFR
    replied
    I never understood cutting filler in half, personally. I use everything from .035" to 1/8" and never cut them down unless the situation calls for it.

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  • OldSparks
    replied
    Everything I use is cut in halve and it was only recently that I even heard of anyone using a full length filler. Surprised to hear so many other people leave them long.

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  • TheRealSpinner
    replied
    I usually cut my 1/16" filler in half because it is less flimsy. I find that the shorter lengths are easier to aim and are more accurate. With larger than 1/16", I find it unnecessary. I agree with [email protected] and Coalsmoke, it does tend to be wasteful to cut in half, and it is easier to store 36" pieces.

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  • Fishy Jim
    replied
    Thanks for the responses guys. I can see where it might be easier with the larger fillers. Like I said, I had just never heard anyone claiming half of weldors did it automatically.

    I have worn out ****s I leave on my mig machine for cutting steel. It's just so rare to need to "produce" a short piece of filler. I typically have a half used one on hand anyway when I need to get into a tight spot.

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