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How to weld SS exhaust piping?

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  • How to weld SS exhaust piping?

    Hi, this is my first project using my Tig welder. ITs a TA-185. I would like to know how I should setup my machine and any tips in welding. The pipes are 2.5" and 3" SS 304 16 gauge. What are the recommenadtinos?



    Also any tips on Aluminum?


    I am in a hurry so I don't have time to practice. I've only miged before. Should I just have someone weld for me? Could I do the SS welding and have someone else do the Aluminum?


    Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
    Marco

  • #2
    Originally posted by POLOLOUS
    Hi, this is my first project using my Tig welder. ITs a TA-185. I would like to know how I should setup my machine and any tips in welding. The pipes are 2.5" and 3" SS 304 16 gauge. What are the recommenadtinos?



    Also any tips on Aluminum?


    I am in a hurry so I don't have time to practice. I've only miged before. Should I just have someone weld for me? Could I do the SS welding and have someone else do the Aluminum?


    Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
    Marco
    You've already answered your own question: "Should I just have someone weld for me?" Without a doubt, YES!
    hre

    Comment


    • #3
      I was pretty sure, just needed back up, lol. What method or way would be best to setup my exhaust piping for the welder? I need to have very little error in the piping. Should I use duck tape to hold to pieces togethor?

      Comment


      • #4
        Or should I be able to atleast tack weld the pipes togethor that I need? I know I can't fully weld and seal them like they have to be. But I should be able to easily tack weld them every inch or 2? No?

        Comment


        • #5
          well, that depends a lot on the tacks. If I got to that job and there were 3 or 4 small neat tacks, that weren't too cold or too hot (careful you don't cook the stainless), I would be pretty satisfied and the job would be easier than doing all the setup myself before welding. But, if the tacks were a mess or I had to cut out sections of the tub to get rid of damaged areas, you can bet the bill would be going up. Because you haven't practised yet, I'd say do all your cuts, make sure the pipes are sized right and ready to go, and leave the rest to the welder. If you clamped the pipes in a jig, it would be even better, but, that's hard to do if they happen to be under a car.
          hre

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          • #6
            Well I'm gonna practice some tacks on some scrap from cutting. If I can get it clean and neat I'll tack 3-4 times on the pipes. I have a very good understanding of a good, bad, clean, dirty weld. And I will have the settings set for tack welding 16 gauge/1/16th. I will practice with scrap first.


            One last thing. Is it reccomended to sand/grind the outer edge where the two pipes will meet of the pipe to half the thickness for a better joining or just a little clean up on the edge?

            Comment


            • #7
              To properly weld, you need to clean the area with wire brush, then acetone.

              The pipe must then be backfilled with argon through a 2nd flow meter.

              You then want to weld very close and precise with the seams being darn close to perfect.

              Since this is your first tig experience it is liking jumping into the ocean 20 miles off coast and learning to swim.

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              • #8
                I understand all those points and I'm not doing anything but possibly tacking them up for a pro. My question is if it's reccomended to sand/grind the outer edge where the two pipes will meet of the pipe to half the thickness for a better joining or just a little clean up on the edge?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by POLOLOUS
                  I understand all those points and I'm not doing anything but possibly tacking them up for a pro. My question is if it's reccomended to sand/grind the outer edge where the two pipes will meet of the pipe to half the thickness for a better joining or just a little clean up on the edge?
                  not if they are only 16 ga. let the welder do the outer wipe-down when he gets there.
                  hre

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Fit up is critical!! No gaps or overlaps wanted. If there is a gap when you weld it, it will pull it closed thereby changing the angle of the joint. Besides that, gaps make it harder to weld. I would not bevel the edges (do not sand them 1/2 thickness). You do not need to backpurge these to weld them. It is an exhaust system not critical pressure or sanitary piping. As for setting the machine up, you can use 100 amps & regulate with the foot pedal. Just press slowly (not fully) & watch for it to start forming a puddle. Once the puddle starts to form then stop depressing pedal. If the fit up is exact it should fuse together. If not add a dab of wire.---MMW---
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                    • #11
                      I would get a roll of .023 308L mig wire and mig your exhaust together.

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                      • #12
                        Also any tips on Aluminum?
                        I am in a hurry so I don't have time to practice.
                        Yes, be prepared to ruin hundreds of dollars of material, before you realize that what your atempting is nearly impossible.

                        Or use that money to pay someone else do it, and practice later when your not in so much of a hurry.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ShieldArc
                          I would get a roll of .023 308L mig wire and mig your exhaust together.
                          that's another option, but the wire won't be cheap.
                          hre

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                          • #14
                            I just finished a turbo install for a customer who cut and fit his stainless pipes.There were a few gaps which I wouldnt consider a problem for a capable welder so if you do fit your own stuff keep the gaps to 1/16 or less. If its more the welder wont like you as the material will move while welding and more during the cool down period. Stainless is the worst for movement even on very well fit 1/16 tube. The problem I had with this guys work is that he used solid wire with his mig to tack the pipes in place. And then wants me to tig weld all the joints. If you use a mig to tack the pipes make sure you use stainless wire and tri mix gas. If your fit is good and you buy the proper wire and gas I think you should do the job yourself with a mig assuming you have one. If your going to tack the pipes with your tig Take your time and you will do a good job. If the welds need to be taken down a bit then just hit them with your sanding disk. Its exhaust pipe. Live a little. Trying to get it done faster by tacking the job together and having another welder do the job isnt always faster and almost never cheaper.

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                            • #15
                              Thanks MeanDean for the tips. I have a tig and a cheap mig. I am only tig welding the tacks. And even after practicing on some scrap if I mess up, I'll just grind it down like you said and start over. I'm only going to tack in 2-3 spots. I got intouch with a really good welder today, I'll be getting all my work done for about $100. Definatly worth it for my project.

                              Any opinions on Aluminum welding? I'm having him do that also for me but just asking to see. I've only ever welded steel. But from what I gather from reading, Aluminum is fairly simple, aside from the correct prep work. The only challenging part is watching your puddle. Which I'm really good at. Any other concerns?

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