Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What Anodized Aluminum Welds Should Look Like

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    George,
    the repeat mode should work really well by playing with the downslope time.
    Try a real short ramp down time to see what happens. If not then try the on/off only. You have the tech. to do what you need but it always boils down to skill somewhere along the way.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Scott V
      George,
      the repeat mode should work really well by playing with the downslope time.
      Try a real short ramp down time to see what happens. If not then try the on/off only. You have the tech. to do what you need but it always boils down to skill somewhere along the way.
      I can start with 0 sec up to 25 sec in tenths of a sec, I do wonder about setting it very short and letting it go into postflow. I can set it long, say 3-4 sec, then it could be controlled by manually letting it go down the ramp until it looks right then button back to the full amperage again and keep repeating until you are done. Sounds like it will need some practice for sure, I may need to get ahold of more annodized scrap to try it out on, in any case it sounds like it will be fun or frustrating or both.
      Regards, George

      Hobart Handler 210 w/DP3035 - Great 240V small Mig
      Hobart Handler 140 - Great 120V Mig
      Hobart Handler EZ125 - IMO the best 120V Flux Core only machine

      Miller Dynasty 200DX with cooler of my design, works for me
      Miller Spectrum 375 - Nice Cutter

      Comment


      • #18
        I prefer NOT using any sequencer or anything on this stuff. the reason is because by doing it all manually, you have all the adjustability you want "on the fly." Fits are never perfect, and having the ability to change timing of your bumping the button helps you control heat as needed.

        Comment


        • #19
          Engloid,

          Didn't you take a job welding anodized aluminum within the last few months? What was your final approach to welding through an anodized surface?

          Regards,
          Bill
          "The more I learn about welding the more I find there is to learn..."

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Engloid
            I prefer NOT using any sequencer or anything on this stuff. the reason is because by doing it all manually, you have all the adjustability you want "on the fly." Fits are never perfect, and having the ability to change timing of your bumping the button helps you control heat as needed.
            Have you used the repeat mode with the Dynasty series
            or the Thermal unit. Just wondering if you have tried
            it and discarded it for this application. 99.9 % of the
            owners of those machine never have used it. That
            is why I asked.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Scott V
              Have you used the repeat mode with the Dynasty series
              or the Thermal unit. Just wondering if you have tried
              it and discarded it for this application. 99.9 % of the
              owners of those machine never have used it. That
              is why I asked.
              Honestly, no...but I can't really see how it would be of benefit, especially on inconsistent fitups... However, explain the logic behind it and such... maybe I'll be swayed into giving it a shot.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Engloid
                Honestly, no...but I can't really see how it would be of benefit, especially on inconsistent fitups... However, explain the logic behind it and such... maybe I'll be swayed into giving it a shot.
                When using a button in the four step mode it allows a way to control
                current without going into downslope. If you are welding along at the set current on the machine, and you push the button, it slopes down the end current. Let up on the button it ramps back up. It will ramp up as long as you don't go past your ramp down time. If you do hold to long, it will go into finish current set and then on to post flow. It is doing about the same thing you are doing with the fast button movement. It works really smooth for me because
                the puddle is aways getting away from me.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Sounds like entirely to much thought put into it. Button, fill, advance, bottun, fill, advance, etc. Give it a try, its almost like you have to let the bead freeze around the edges, then attack it with another jolt and some wire for the next bead. There are some guys out there can do it with a foot pedal and some pumping. Everything mus be as clean as possible also.
                  Trailblazer 302g
                  coolmate4
                  hf-251d-1
                  super s-32p
                  you can never know enough

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    One thing I have noticed is that the brushed pipe welds different than the polished pipe. The polished pipe, like the kind in the picture seems to have less anodize material and as a result seems to weld cleaner than the 320 grit brushed pipe. If you notice in the picture, the anodize is distinctly pushed out of the puddle. The sand grooves must allow the anodize to build up more on the brushed pipe. Consequently, the anodize gets pushed out of the puddle quicker and easier with the polished pipe. Can anyone confirm my observation?

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      This weld is from the guys at EM&C. According to a recent article, these welds were made in a single pass. The welds on this t-top look nothing like the Pipe Welders' weld although most of them have been "reflowed."
                      Attached Files

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by martinmarinedes
                        This weld is from the guys at EM&C. According to a recent article, these welds were made in a single pass. The welds on this t-top look nothing like the Pipe Welders' weld although most of them have been "reflowed."
                        Those welds look like the welds on a t-top a semi-local guy did for me a couple years ago. He does great work and has nice designs for custom tops.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X